Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘opioid epidemic’

Are You Considered High Risk for Opioid Abuse?

Posted on: January 12th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Risk of Opioid Abuse

As the opioid epidemic continues to wreak havoc on the health of the nation, experts are working to understand the factors that can lead to opioid addiction or misuse. Certain people may have an increased risk for opioid abuse and should be very cautious about using opioids for any medical reasons. Knowing your own risk level can help keep you informed and safe from the dangers of opioid addiction.

Certain genetic factors can influence whether someone is more likely to become addicted to opioids. If you have had issues with another type of addiction in the past or if a close family member has had addiction problems then you may be at higher risk. Addiction can be an inherited trait so people with a family history of drug abuse should avoid using opioids or other addictive drugs.

People with mental health issues are also more likely to be at risk for opioid abuse and addiction. Someone with a mental illness may be more likely to abuse drugs as a way to alleviate their symptoms. The tendency to self-medicate makes mental illness sufferers much more vulnerable to addiction.

Another complicated risk factor is the issue of chronic pain. People who suffer from chronic pain are more likely to become addicted to opioids because they may be prescribed the drug on a long term basis due to their condition. Alternative pain treatment methods may be preferable for people with chronic pain who are concerned about their vulnerability to becoming addicted to opioids.

There are many other risk factors that can make someone more likely to abuse opioids such as living in a rural area, being unemployed, or having financial problems. The important thing to keep in mind is that opioids are a highly addictive drug and even with the absence of these risk factors, it is still possible to develop a problem with abuse.

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

Posted on: December 19th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

When someone in the family has an addiction, loved ones often feel helpless and don’t know what to do to change their behavior. Sometimes the addict reaches their lowest point and may end up on the street, homeless because their addiction has become out of control. If this happens, it is crucial for the family to step in and help them recover before their situation gets worse.

Homeless people very frequently suffer from drug or alcohol addiction and the prognosis for living on the street for an addict is not good. They could get into dangerous situations and their health and wellbeing will suffer greatly. Loved ones might feel panicked and afraid when they find out that a family member is homeless and their initial reaction may be to take them into their home.

However, the first thing to think about when helping a family member from homelessness is how to address their addiction. Once you make sure they are safe, it is then time to start researching shelters and recovery programs that are designed to help homeless people with addictions. Getting them into some kind of treatment should be your first priority once you get them off of the street.

Once you do some research into the best treatment plan for them, make sure to drop them off and accompany them when they enter the facility. Since they most likely have hit rock bottom as a result of their homelessness, they may already understand how important it is for them to quit their substance abuse. It can also be helpful to check in on their progress, attend family therapy sessions and be supportive throughout their recovery program.

When an addict becomes homeless, they are at their most desperate point and need your help. Most importantly they also need professional treatment to get back on their feet.

What is Opiophobia?

Posted on: October 3rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opiophobia

With the opioid addiction crisis growing in the U.S. there are other issues surrounding painkillers that are becoming problematic. Because opioids have led to such high rates of overdose, a new trend of opiophobia has led to some people avoiding medication even to cope with chronic pain. Fear of the consequences of taking opioids is causing both doctors and patients to avoid prescription painkillers even when there are legitimate medical reasons for using them.

Although opioids can be addictive in many cases, some patients who are experiencing chronic pain can still benefit from controlled use of the medication. Misinformation about the medical value of opioids has been leading many people to avoid them at all costs and they are suffering from serious pain problems as a result. Even though opioid addiction is something to seriously consider before taking medication, there are some instances where it can be life saving.

Health care providers who are too hesitant to provide patients with opioid prescriptions may be allowing them to struggle with pain unnecessarily. Excessive regulation and insufficient medical use of opioids can be devastating problems for people who suffer from chronic pain. Unfortunately some of the efforts to combat addiction have led to reduced access to opioids for the people that truly need them.

It is important for people in the medical industry and patients alike to be educated about the dangers of opioids but also the instances in which they are useful and necessary. Even though it is a top priority to curb the high rates of abuse and overdose, avoiding opioids at all costs can also be problematic in other ways. Finding a balance between regulating powerful medications and having them available for those in need is a complicated issue that needs to be addressed in order to help minimize the damage surrounding the opioid crisis.

Opioid Abuse in Workplace: Some Industries Hit the Hardest

Posted on: September 27th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opioid Abuse in the Workplace

The opioid epidemic is an issue that has been spreading across the nation in recent years but certain demographics have been hit harder than others. Opioid addiction has affected not only specific age groups but also certain types of industries more than others. Where a person works can be another factor in their vulnerability for developing a problem with opioids.

The workers that have been affected most by the opioid crisis are those in the construction industry. Nearly a quarter of the opioid-related overdose deaths in the state of Massachusetts were among people who worked in construction. High rates of overdose also occurred in industries such as farming, fishing and forestry which had five times as many deaths as other workers in the state.

These types of jobs may be linked to higher rates of abuse and overdose because they physically demanding and are often linked to workplace injuries. It is possible that workers get hooked on opioids following an injury due to the medication they are prescribed. The stress of their jobs may also influence them to seek relief from prescription drugs that offer a feeling of euphoria.

In general, studies found that people in industries without much job security were more likely to abuse opioids. It is possible that opioids provide a way for people to return to work quickly following an injury. In industries with high rates of injuries and low job security, workers may not want to risk losing their job and rely on opioids to get them through the work day.

Although the opioid crisis has impacted people from all walks of life, certain types of jobs may lead to more issues with opioids than others. Education and treatment are crucial in reducing the number of overdose deaths in any industry in the U.S.

Fentanyl is Present In Majority of Opioid Deaths

Posted on: May 25th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opioid Deaths

The highly potent opioid known as fentanyl has been a cause for concern recently as more and more overdoses have occurred as a result of the drug. Many dealers have been lacing their illegal drugs with fentanyl without the user’s knowledge. As a result, many have unknowingly ingested a powerful sedative and ended up overdosing.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that has caused an alarming increase in death rates and addiction. The opioid is most commonly found laced in combination with cocaine, methamphetamines, and other illegal drugs sold on the street. Dealers may be adding traces of opioids in order to make their drugs more addictive to the people buying them.

New statistics have shown that fentanyl was involved in nearly half of all opioid-related deaths in the year 2016. Many of the deaths were due to opioid or heroin overdose but some of them involved other drugs as well. Fentanyl was a factor in many overdose deaths involving non-opioids such as cocaine, benzodiazepines and antidepressants.

It is important for the public to be educated about the dangers of fentanyl in order to prevent overdose deaths from continuing to increase. Fentanyl is a very powerful drug that is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine. A small amount of fentanyl laced with any drug can cause the user to overdose if they have no tolerance for opioids and are not aware it is in their drug.

Someone overdosing on fentanyl might have trouble breathing, have a slow or erratic pulse and lose consciousness. Certain medications can help to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose so it is important to get help immediately to prevent an overdose from becoming fatal. When people know more about fentanyl and its effects it can be possible to reduce overdoses and potentially save lives.