Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘opioid epidemic’

What is Opiophobia?

Posted on: October 3rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

What is Opiophobia?

With the opioid addiction crisis growing in the U.S. there are other issues surrounding painkillers that are becoming problematic. Because opioids have led to such high rates of overdose, a new trend of opiophobia has led to some people avoiding medication even to cope with chronic pain. Fear of the consequences of taking opioids is causing both doctors and patients to avoid prescription painkillers even when there are legitimate medical reasons for using them.

Although opioids can be addictive in many cases, some patients who are experiencing chronic pain can still benefit from controlled use of the medication. Misinformation about the medical value of opioids has been leading many people to avoid them at all costs and they are suffering from serious pain problems as a result. Even though opioid addiction is something to seriously consider before taking medication, there are some instances where it can be life saving.

Health care providers who are too hesitant to provide patients with opioid prescriptions may be allowing them to struggle with pain unnecessarily. Excessive regulation and insufficient medical use of opioids can be devastating problems for people who suffer from chronic pain. Unfortunately some of the efforts to combat addiction have led to reduced access to opioids for the people that truly need them.

It is important for people in the medical industry and patients alike to be educated about the dangers of opioids but also the instances in which they are useful and necessary. Even though it is a top priority to curb the high rates of abuse and overdose, avoiding opioids at all costs can also be problematic in other ways. Finding a balance between regulating powerful medications and having them available for those in need is a complicated issue that needs to be addressed in order to help minimize the damage surrounding the opioid crisis.

Opioid Abuse in the Workplace: Some Industries Hit the Hardest

Posted on: September 27th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opioid Abuse in the Workplace: Some Industries Hit the Hardest

The opioid epidemic is an issue that has been spreading across the nation in recent years but certain demographics have been hit harder than others. Opioid addiction has affected not only specific age groups but also certain types of industries more than others. Where a person works can be another factor in their vulnerability for developing a problem with opioids.

The workers that have been affected most by the opioid crisis are those in the construction industry. Nearly a quarter of the opioid-related overdose deaths in the state of Massachusetts were among people who worked in construction. High rates of overdose also occurred in industries such as farming, fishing and forestry which had five times as many deaths as other workers in the state.

These types of jobs may be linked to higher rates of abuse and overdose because they physically demanding and are often linked to workplace injuries. It is possible that workers get hooked on opioids following an injury due to the medication they are prescribed. The stress of their jobs may also influence them to seek relief from prescription drugs that offer a feeling of euphoria.

In general, studies found that people in industries without much job security were more likely to abuse opioids. It is possible that opioids provide a way for people to return to work quickly following an injury. In industries with high rates of injuries and low job security, workers may not want to risk losing their job and rely on opioids to get them through the work day.

Although the opioid crisis has impacted people from all walks of life, certain types of jobs may lead to more issues with opioids than others. Education and treatment are crucial in reducing the number of overdose deaths in any industry in the U.S.

Fentanyl is Present In Majority of Opioid Deaths

Posted on: May 25th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Fentanyl is Present In Majority of Opioid Deaths

The highly potent opioid known as fentanyl has been a cause for concern recently as more and more overdoses have occurred as a result of the drug. Many dealers have been lacing their illegal drugs with fentanyl without the user’s knowledge. As a result, many have unknowingly ingested a powerful sedative and ended up overdosing.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that has caused an alarming increase in death rates and addiction. The opioid is most commonly found laced in combination with cocaine, methamphetamines, and other illegal drugs sold on the street. Dealers may be adding traces of opioids in order to make their drugs more addictive to the people buying them.

New statistics have shown that fentanyl was involved in nearly half of all opioid-related deaths in the year 2016. Many of the deaths were due to opioid or heroin overdose but some of them involved other drugs as well. Fentanyl was a factor in many overdose deaths involving non-opioids such as cocaine, benzodiazepines and antidepressants.

It is important for the public to be educated about the dangers of fentanyl in order to prevent overdose deaths from continuing to increase. Fentanyl is a very powerful drug that is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine. A small amount of fentanyl laced with any drug can cause the user to overdose if they have no tolerance for opioids and are not aware it is in their drug.

Someone overdosing on fentanyl might have trouble breathing, have a slow or erratic pulse and lose consciousness. Certain medications can help to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose so it is important to get help immediately to prevent an overdose from becoming fatal. When people know more about fentanyl and its effects it can be possible to reduce overdoses and potentially save lives.

Norco Addiction & Detox

Posted on: May 3rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Norco Detox | Norco addiction | Norco side effects

Norco Detox

Norco Addiction

Norco Detox – Drug companies have produced many options for people with chronic pain to be able to deal with the pain and continue with their lives in the midst of a healing process. This is undoubtedly a good thing, but it also creates dangers. Painkillers that contain opioids can have a very high risk of dependency, where a user becomes unable to function without the drug, and are at a high danger of death or serious health problems from an overdose. Today we discuss about Norco Addiction and Norco Side Effects here.

Norco is a drug that contains both hydrocodone, a narcotic, opioid painkiller and acetaminophen (Tylenol) , a more mild pain reliever that can increase the narcotic’s effectiveness. When used under strict instructions of a healthcare professional monitoring use, it can be very effective to treat moderate to moderately severe pain, but still carries a risk of becoming habit-forming. However, when taken recreationally, it can be very dangerous. The concern for norco abuse and addiction is the primary reason that, in 2014, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) increased control for Norco from Schedule III to Schedule II, meaning drugs with a recognized medical purpose, but a high potential for abuse and dependence.

Norco Side Effects on the Brain: A functioning brain has “opioid receptors” that cause the brain to release endorphins, chemicals produced naturally in the body. Endorphins make pain less severe and help you feel happy and relaxed. Norco addiction works by producing synthetic “endorphins” when you need an extra boost to dull more severe physical pain. Eventually, your brain will get used to receiving endorphins from the outside source, and stop producing them naturally. This means the user will have to start taking more and more of a drug in order to have the same feelings, because without it feels impossible to have any good feelings at all. The person addicted has to keep taking more and more in order to get the same effects, or even just to feel “normal.”

Norco Side Effects

Dangers of Abuse: Some people may falsely assume that a drug made in a lab and prescribed by a doctor is safe compared with an illicit street drug. However, if misused, or taken outside of medical supervision, there can be serious dangers. An overdose can result in serious, permanent brain damage and even death.

Because it exhausts and then depletes the body’s natural reception of endorphins, Norco misuse can have serious psychological effects, including:

  • Depression
  • Malaise, or an undefined sense of unease and discomfort
  • Mental cloudiness and confusion
  • Anxiety

There are also some serious Norco side effects to physical health, that become more likely and more severe the more of the drug is taken:

  • Inadequate breathing
  • Hearing loss
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Dizziness
  • Sleep apnea
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Sweating
  • Nausea

Warning Signs: Misuse and dependency of Norco can be very dangerous, which is why it should never be taken without the strict instructions of a doctor.

However, even if Norco is being used as part of a health care and pain relief agenda, there is still the danger of developing dependency. If you are a Norco user, watch out for these signs suggesting your behavior is abusive or addictive:

  • Taking more or a higher dose of Norco than the doctor prescribes.
  • “Doctor shopping,” going to multiple doctors or lying to your health care providers to get pills you don’t really need.
  • Mixing Narco with cocaine, heroin, or alcohol to get a more intense high.
  • Taking it for recreational purposes, or without a prescription.

Norco Detox and Recovery

Although not an easy process, recovery from Norco addiction is possible. Addiction has both a physical and a mental element, and so your recovery will deal with both of these aspects.

Physical healing and recovery comes first, through the detox process. Before doing anything else, it’s necessary to have a long enough period of sobriety that the drugs are flushed from your system, so the body can do the work of repairing itself. Withdrawl from Norco addiction can be a painful and sometimes even dangerous process, so it is highly recommended that you seek out a rehab center rather than attempting detox on your own. There will be some unpleasant side-effects to withdraw, for a period of time that will vary based on the intensity of the addiction. However, in the end, you will be able to finally start living a life of freedom again.

After Norco detox comes the life-long work of recovery, to address the causes of addictive behavior and stop the cycle of abuse and dependency. Through group and individual therapy, you will learn how to gain a new perspective on life, and start over from a place of caring for yourself.

Required Opioid Seminars for Parents?

Posted on: April 23rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Required Opioid Seminars for Parents?

With the opioid epidemic causing issues of abuse and overdose throughout the country, people are looking for answers in order to minimize and prevent addiction. Fighting the opioid epidemic can be possible through a combination of treatment for existing issues and preventative education so that people are aware of the dangers of the drug. Some high schools are now providing required seminars to educate kids about the addictive nature of opioids.

One superintendent of a high school in New Jersey was heart broken by the deaths of at least half a dozen students at the school who overdosed on opioids. Even parents of children in the school have experienced fatal overdoses as well. In order to take action he made it a requirement for seniors to attend an opioid seminar before they could graduate.

These types of seminars are designed to help people learn how to identify signs and signals that someone is addicted to opioids. It can also provide them with information about the dangers of overdose and the risky nature of abusing these kinds of drugs. Students and parents alike can benefit from being educated about these issues especially when it is directly affecting the community.

Making the seminars a requirement is a tactic to help prevent poor attendance which has been a problem in the past for educational opioid seminars. School officials are hoping to reach more people within the school and the general community so that they know about these issues and will be able to take action if they notice someone might be struggling with an addiction.

Opioid abuse is a problem that is plaguing the whole country and when people are more educated about these drugs it can help to reduce the number of incidents of addiction and fatal overdose.