Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘opioid epidemic’

The Rural vs Urban Opioid Crisis

Posted on: March 2nd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
The Rural vs Urban Opioid Crisis

As the opioid epidemic continues to grow, researchers are beginning to recognize trends in how abuse and overdose affect different areas throughout the country. Opioid addiction is more dramatically affecting people living in rural areas rather than those in urban cities especially when it comes to prescription opioids. Older adults in rural areas are more frequently dealing with addiction and fatal overdoses than those in other parts of the country.

One of the reasons opioids have hit rural areas so hard is that people living these areas have nearly two times the odds of being prescribed opioids than those in urban cities. Studies have revealed that even though opioid prescriptions have been declining overall they still remain relatively high in rural areas. People in rural counties actually have an 87 percent higher chance of receiving an opioid prescription compared with people in metropolitan areas.

Prescription habits among primary care doctors may be at least partially to blame for the differences in prescription addiction in rural areas. Rural adults tend to be the ones that experience the highest rates of opioid issues and more are being hospitalized on a regular basis for their problems with prescription painkillers. Physicians in rural counties are often providing these kinds of drugs for people with pain problems because they feel they may not have the time or resources to get physical therapy or surgery.

There are also many barriers for people in rural areas to receive the treatment they need for addiction because they may have to travel long distances or experience long wait times to getting help. It may be more difficult for them to get the support they need to recover. It is important to establish more access to care for people in rural areas and to prevent rural doctors from overprescribing opioids in order to effectively reduce the opioid crisis.

Are We in a New Phase of Opioid Crisis?

Posted on: February 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Are We in a New Phase of Opioid Crisis?

Even though the level of opioid abuse and overdose has already reached epidemic proportions, the problem is continuing to escalate into a new and more dramatic phase. Researchers are predicting that the problem will keep growing and shift into a different form as new kinds of opioids are being consumed more often. They also predict that some of the programs aimed restricting access to prescription painkillers may not be enough to stem the tide of abuse.

One of the biggest issues that is changing the path of the opioid epidemic is the introduction of new and powerful synthetic opioids like fentanyl. This synthetic drug is 50 times more potent than heroin and even a small amount can lead to an overdose if the user doesn’t have enough of a tolerance. Fentanyl has led to overdoses in areas throughout the country and even a mass overdose where 13 people at the same party needed to be revived.

The number of overdose deaths attributed to fentanyl has been steadily rising and causing health issues all over the U.S. Fentanyl is dangerous not only because it is so potent but also due to its low “therapeutic index” or the line between a safe dose and a fatal one. It can be very easy to overdose on fentanyl because even a microgram can be too much for a person’s body to handle.

Researchers predict that fentanyl will cause an increase in opioid abuse and overdose in the near future. It may be some time before the U.S. is able to reduce instances of opioid addiction and deaths related to opioid abuse. Our current programs may not be enough to prevent the growing number of deaths resulting from both prescription opioids and fentanyl.

New tactics may be necessary to try to change the current course of the opioid epidemic.

Are You Considered High Risk for Opioid Abuse?

Posted on: January 12th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Risk of Opioid Abuse

As the opioid epidemic continues to wreak havoc on the health of the nation, experts are working to understand the factors that can lead to opioid addiction or misuse. Certain people may have an increased risk for opioid abuse and should be very cautious about using opioids for any medical reasons. Knowing your own risk level can help keep you informed and safe from the dangers of opioid addiction.

Certain genetic factors can influence whether someone is more likely to become addicted to opioids. If you have had issues with another type of addiction in the past or if a close family member has had addiction problems then you may be at higher risk. Addiction can be an inherited trait so people with a family history of drug abuse should avoid using opioids or other addictive drugs.

People with mental health issues are also more likely to be at risk for opioid abuse and addiction. Someone with a mental illness may be more likely to abuse drugs as a way to alleviate their symptoms. The tendency to self-medicate makes mental illness sufferers much more vulnerable to addiction.

Another complicated risk factor is the issue of chronic pain. People who suffer from chronic pain are more likely to become addicted to opioids because they may be prescribed the drug on a long term basis due to their condition. Alternative pain treatment methods may be preferable for people with chronic pain who are concerned about their vulnerability to becoming addicted to opioids.

There are many other risk factors that can make someone more likely to abuse opioids such as living in a rural area, being unemployed, or having financial problems. The important thing to keep in mind is that opioids are a highly addictive drug and even with the absence of these risk factors, it is still possible to develop a problem with abuse.

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

Posted on: December 19th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

When someone in the family has an addiction, loved ones often feel helpless and don’t know what to do to change their behavior. Sometimes the addict reaches their lowest point and may end up on the street, homeless because their addiction has become out of control. If this happens, it is crucial for the family to step in and help them recover before their situation gets worse.

Homeless people very frequently suffer from drug or alcohol addiction and the prognosis for living on the street for an addict is not good. They could get into dangerous situations and their health and wellbeing will suffer greatly. Loved ones might feel panicked and afraid when they find out that a family member is homeless and their initial reaction may be to take them into their home.

However, the first thing to think about when helping a family member from homelessness is how to address their addiction. Once you make sure they are safe, it is then time to start researching shelters and recovery programs that are designed to help homeless people with addictions. Getting them into some kind of treatment should be your first priority once you get them off of the street.

Once you do some research into the best treatment plan for them, make sure to drop them off and accompany them when they enter the facility. Since they most likely have hit rock bottom as a result of their homelessness, they may already understand how important it is for them to quit their substance abuse. It can also be helpful to check in on their progress, attend family therapy sessions and be supportive throughout their recovery program.

When an addict becomes homeless, they are at their most desperate point and need your help. Most importantly they also need professional treatment to get back on their feet.

What is Opiophobia?

Posted on: October 3rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opiophobia

With the opioid addiction crisis growing in the U.S. there are other issues surrounding painkillers that are becoming problematic. Because opioids have led to such high rates of overdose, a new trend of opiophobia has led to some people avoiding medication even to cope with chronic pain. Fear of the consequences of taking opioids is causing both doctors and patients to avoid prescription painkillers even when there are legitimate medical reasons for using them.

Although opioids can be addictive in many cases, some patients who are experiencing chronic pain can still benefit from controlled use of the medication. Misinformation about the medical value of opioids has been leading many people to avoid them at all costs and they are suffering from serious pain problems as a result. Even though opioid addiction is something to seriously consider before taking medication, there are some instances where it can be life saving.

Health care providers who are too hesitant to provide patients with opioid prescriptions may be allowing them to struggle with pain unnecessarily. Excessive regulation and insufficient medical use of opioids can be devastating problems for people who suffer from chronic pain. Unfortunately some of the efforts to combat addiction have led to reduced access to opioids for the people that truly need them.

It is important for people in the medical industry and patients alike to be educated about the dangers of opioids but also the instances in which they are useful and necessary. Even though it is a top priority to curb the high rates of abuse and overdose, avoiding opioids at all costs can also be problematic in other ways. Finding a balance between regulating powerful medications and having them available for those in need is a complicated issue that needs to be addressed in order to help minimize the damage surrounding the opioid crisis.