Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Addiction Treatment’ Category

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

Posted on: September 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

People suffering from anxiety are 2 to 3 times more likely to struggle with addiction. Since 18% of the American population is suffering from anxiety, it’s not surprising that many individuals in drug rehab have a co-occurring anxiety disorder. For this reason, drug rehab centers treat anxiety (and other mental illnesses) concurrently with the substance use disorder.

Here is what you need to know about the link between anxiety and substance use, and how it is treated in rehab centers.

The Link Between Anxiety and Substance Use

There are a number of reasons people suffering from anxiety start using substances. For people suffering from social anxiety disorder, alcohol and other substances give them confidence and lower their inhibitions. They may start using the substance in group settings or when they are afraid they won’t be able to speak to someone important.

In contrast, many people suffering from various forms of anxiety use drugs and alcohol to turn off their mind’s chatter. This is especially true for people suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who struggle to find ways to quiet obsessive thoughts. However, it is often also the case for people with other forms of anxiety.

Since anxiety can lead to insomnia, as the individual struggles to shut down their mind despite being exhausted, some sufferers turn to drugs or alcohol to help get to sleep.

There are many avenues which lead people suffering from anxiety to substance abuse. How is anxiety treated in drug rehab centers?

Dual-Diagnosis

All good rehab centers take a dual-diagnosis approach to recovery. This means that they treat any co-occurring mental illnesses concurrently with the substance use disorder. As with anxiety, many other mental illnesses correlate with substance abuse, and in order to fully recover, patients need to treat both.

Therefore, anxiety treatment in a drug rehab center is given high priority. On some occasions, addiction treatment coincides with proven anxiety treatments.

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

Many common treatments for substance use disorder intersect with treatments for anxiety. Group therapy is a fundamental part of drug rehab. It gives residents the opportunity to voice their issues, rather than obsessing over them internally. The sense of community helps individuals know they are not alone, and the support reassures them.

Mindfulness training is also useful for both addiction and anxiety. Mindfulness techniques help individuals quiet their minds, letting the troubling thoughts come and go rather than holding onto them or trying in vain to get rid of them.

Individual Therapy

While every patient in a rehab center will receive individual therapy, it provides those suffering with anxiety to confront the problem head-on. In individual therapy, patients can focus on their own personal issues and not just their substance use. They work with the therapist to understand where their anxiety originated and identify the narratives that drive the anxiety. With this understanding, they can begin changing those narratives in a significant, paradigmatic way.

In addition, individual therapy gives the person the chance to learn specific techniques to deal with anxiety. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is perhaps the most popular therapy used for treating anxiety in particular. In CBT, the individual learns to identify and challenge troubling thoughts. Often these thoughts are irrational, and challenging them brings this to light, helping the person let go of them. Even if the thoughts are rational, obsessing over them is often irrational and, with practice, the individual learns to let them go.

CBT provides a range of other techniques to manage anxiety. For example, some therapists recommend setting aside “worry time” to spend considering the anxious thoughts, while compartmentalizing them.

Medication

In many cases, psychiatrists will prescribe medication to help individuals manage their anxiety. Rehab centers have psychiatrists who specialize in dealing with addiction. This is important, considering many anti-anxiety medications are addictive. The benzodiazepine class in particular – including Xanax, Valium, Ativan, and other well-known tranquilizers – are known to build dependence.

Instead of prescribing these drugs, which are at best temporary solutions, psychiatrists in rehab centers will prescribe long-term alternatives. Seroquel can help with anxiety and depression, as well as facilitating better sleep. Antidepressants are proven to reduce anxiety. Your psychiatrist will have a wide range of knowledge about the best non-addictive chemical options to treat anxiety.

Occupational Therapy

The rehab center, or your individual counselor, may also provide occupational therapy. This is training that helps you in practical ways, such as creating structure, managing anxiety through day-to-day activities, practicing for job interviews, and much more.

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

Rehab centers place a high importance on treating anxiety and other mental illnesses, as they can lead to rehab. If an individual’s drug use began as a way to deal with anxiety, they need to find adaptive ways of dealing with that anxiety, or drug use will be the most attractive option.

Anxiety disorders and substance use disorders are closely linked. Good drug rehab centers treat anxiety concurrently with addiction.

References:

  1.  Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (2016). Substance Use Disorders
  2. Franken, I. H. and Hendriks, V. M. (2001), Screening and Diagnosis of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Substance Abuse Patients. The American Journal on Addictions, 10: 30-39. doi:10.1080/105504901750160448

  3. Mancebo, M. C., Grant, J. E., Pinto, A., Eisen, J. L., & Rasmussen, S. A. (2009). Substance use disorders in an obsessive compulsive disorder clinical sample. Journal of anxiety disorders, 23(4), 429–435. doi:10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.08.008

  4. Blobaum P. M. (2013). Mapping the literature of addictions treatment. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 101(2), 101–109. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.101.2.005

  5. Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2017). Group Therapy for Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of Clinician Practices. Journal of groups in addiction & recovery, 12(4), 243–259. doi:10.1080/1556035X.2017.1348280

  6. Otte C. (2011). Cognitive behavioral therapy in anxiety disorders: current state of the evidence. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience, 13(4), 413–421

  7. Vasile, R. G., Bruce, S. E., Goisman, R. M., Pagano, M. and Keller, M. B. (2005), Results of a naturalistic longitudinal study of benzodiazepine and SSRI use in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. Depress. Anxiety, 22: 59-67. doi:10.1002/da.20089

The Fundamentals Of Treatment For Drug Abuse

Posted on: August 8th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

While there are various different paths towards recovery, there are certain fundamentals common among all of them. These are treatment modules that every recovery center will provide in each and every one of its programs.

If you or a loved one are going to receive treatment for drug abuse, you can expect the following.

Detox

When you are physically dependent on a substance, stopping cold turkey will lead to severe withdrawals. These withdrawals make it incredibly difficult to stick to the recovery process. In many cases, they can be dangerous and even fatal. For this reason, most drug rehab must begin with detox.

Drug detox refers to the controlled process in which an individual is withdrawn from the substance on which they’ve become dependent. At Gooden Center, detox is prescribed and monitored by medical professionals. The nature of your detox will depend on the substance. Some substances can be stopped cold turkey, while others require a tapering process using safe alternatives to the drug.

Physical dependence on a substance precludes the possibility of effective drug rehab. As long as your body is withdrawing from the substance, it will be difficult to stay clean and focus on the treatment process.

Dual Diagnosis

From the very beginning of the process, psychiatrists at Gooden Center will evaluate whether you may require a dual diagnosis. In many cases, substance abuse is caused by or leads to another mental illness. For example, people suffering with OCD may use drugs to try and quiet their obsessive thoughts. Alternatively, someone who has become accustomed to using drugs when they feel down will ultimately struggle to effectively cope with difficult emotions and this may trigger depression or anxiety.

Treatment of drug abuse will not be effective if co-occurring mental illnesses are not also treated. Aspects of the treatments will overlap, but specific mental illnesses need particular treatments. Furthermore, with the help of a dual diagnosis, therapists and doctors will better know how to approach an individual’s treatment.

Group Sessions

Addiction treatment differs from treatment of other mental illnesses in that group sessions are given far more prominence. Community is understood to be very important in treatment of drug abuse for a number of reasons. Addiction tends to lead to unintentional selfishness. When looking for one’s next fix, it is difficult to take others into account. Groups help substance users become more socially aware once again.

Group sessions also give individuals an opportunity to share their own stories and what they’re struggling with. Since everyone in the group has gone through similar hardships, while doing things they regret, this is a safe space in which no one has room to judge.

In addition, addicts can use group sessions to learn how others have managed to cope without substances. They can share their own techniques and ideas. They can learn to lean on others for support in trying times.

Individual Therapy

Group sessions are excellent for confronting one’s addiction on a general level. However, individual therapy is incredibly important to help you deal with your specific personal concerns. In individual therapy, you will discuss your background and history and identify your coping mechanisms. This will help you see which mechanisms have worked and which have become dysfunctional.

Individual therapy is also necessary when treating most mental illnesses. By working through your issues with a therapist, you are better able to notice your unhealthy patterns. With therapies such as CBT, you learn practical skills to challenge thoughts that tend to lead you in a negative direction.

Psychiatric Medication

Substance users who have a co-occurring disorder will likely be prescribed psychiatric medication to relieve its symptoms. These are generally non-addictive medications that affect the chemicals in your brain, addressing imbalances and providing increased stability. Anti-anxiety and sleeping medications such as Xanax and Stilnox, which have the potential for abuse, will not be prescribed.

Alternative Therapies

You will also have the opportunity to work with alternative therapies, including mindfulness-based techniques. Mindfulness in particular is important when treating addiction, as the approach of taking each moment on its own has helped millions get through the most trying times.

These techniques also give you more options when one or another coping skill is not appropriate to the situation.

Holistic Health

Treatment for drug abuse should take the person as a whole into account. Addiction has both physical and mental aspects, and the healthier a person is in general, the more likely they are to stay clean. Thus, your nutrition and fitness are very important. Similarly, keeping your mind active and developing hobbies or passions helps you sustain a more rounded, fulfilling life free from substances.

Maintenance

No one’s treatment is ever complete at the end of a program. On the contrary, without continued treatment and maintenance, relapse becomes more and more likely. Treatment for drug abuse goes on after leaving rehab, and beyond aftercare and sober living. Attending groups and being part of a recovery community are ideal safeguards to keep you on track in a fulfilling life free of drugs.

References:

1. Ziedonis, D. and Brady, K. (1997). DUAL DIAGNOSIS IN PRIMARY CARE. Medical Clinics of North America, 81(4), pp.1017-1036.

2. Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2017). Group Therapy for Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of Clinician Practices. Journal of groups in addiction & recovery, 12(4), 243–259. doi:10.1080/1556035X.2017.1348280

3. Blobaum P. M. (2013). Mapping the literature of addictions treatment. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 101(2), 101–109. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.101.2.005

4. Lichtigfeld, F. J., & Gillman, M. A. (1998). Antidepressants are not drugs of abuse or dependence. Postgraduate medical journal, 74(875), 529–532. doi:10.1136/pgmj.74.875.529

5. Fluyau, D., Revadigar, N., & Manobianco, B. E. (2018). Challenges of the pharmacological management of benzodiazepine withdrawal, dependence, and discontinuation. Therapeutic advances in psychopharmacology, 8(5), 147–168. doi:10.1177/2045125317753340

6. Young, M. E., DeLorenzi, L. d. and Cunningham, L. (2011), Using Meditation in Addiction Counseling. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, 32: 58-71. doi:10.1002/j.2161-1874.2011.tb00207.x

Money Doesn’t Equal Happiness or Depression?

Posted on: January 29th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Money Doesn’t Equal Happiness or Depression?

A traditional saying tells us as that money can’t buy happiness and most people agree that having everything doesn’t make you happy. But in many cases, a person’s income can determine how and when they are able to heal. People with depression or anxiety are not always able to afford treatment, especially some of the more costly options available to those with a higher income.

People with more money are not necessarily happier, but they do have more opportunities to pay for mental health recovery. When a person is simply struggling to survive and is worried about their financial situation, they may not have the luxury of working on their mental health. For people with severe depression and other mental health issues, money can be an obstacle that prevents them from getting the treatment that they need.

When someone has a higher income they will find it easier to pay for a highly qualified therapist without worrying about their insurance or being put on a waiting list. They can also afford more alternative kinds of treatment that insurance may not cover such as acupuncture, energy healing and other methods. They aren’t necessarily less likely to be depressed, but they do have a wider range of options to help them recover.

Recognizing financial obstacles in getting help is important in improving the overall state of mental health for people in the U.S. Providing more affordable options for treatment is crucial so that everyone can have equal access to recovery from mental illness. For many people, mental health is a luxury that they cannot afford to focus their energy or finances on.

Mental health should not be a privilege but unfortunately that is the case for many people. More mental health programs for low income individuals may be able to help improve the situation and make it possible for people to get the help they need.

 

My Loved One Avoids Me if I Bring Up Treatment

Posted on: September 24th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Loved One Avoids Treatment

When you know someone needs help for an addiction but you find it hard to discuss it with them it can become a problem. Sometimes addicts are still deep in denial even when everyone around them can see that they are going down a dangerous path. If your loved one avoids you when you discuss their addiction with them, it could be that they refuse to recognize that they have a problem.

The important thing to understand about a person’s addiction is that it is an illness that can control how they think and behave. Their decision to avoid you has nothing to do with you but is a reflection of how their substance abuse has taken over their mind. Although it may be difficult to witness they are now wired to do everything they can to keep using drugs.

A good strategy to take is to avoid enabling this person and set limits on your relationship with them. If they ask for money, comfort or a place to stay following a binge then you should keep boundaries with them so you aren’t helping them continue their behavior. Telling someone they need treatment and then doing something to enable them is a way of sending mixed signals.

If you have tried speaking to someone one on one about their addiction they are not responsive then might be time to stage an intervention. Try to gather as many friends, family and loved ones who are concerned about the addict and organize a time and place when you can discuss the problem with them. An intervention is often the most effective way to reach someone with an addiction because they see that everyone is in agreement that they have a problem and are more likely to choose to get help.

Dealing with the Side Effects of Addiction Medication

Posted on: July 23rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Side Effects of Addiction Medication

People with very severe addictions often benefit from having substitute medications which can help them to immediately get off a harmful drug. Medications like methadone and suboxone can be useful tools to allow someone with a very serious dependency on opioids to start working on recovery without many of the intense withdrawal symptoms initially. Although these medications can save lives, they have a few side effects that patients will need to adjust to until they eventually wean themselves off of any substances.

Each person will react differently to a certain medication and if a particular option has too many side effects they can try something else instead. Methadone can have short term side effects when someone first begins using it such as drowsiness, light-headedness, or gastrointestinal problems. While the side effects may be unpleasant they can be dealt with through other types of over the counter or prescription medications.

In some cases methadone can also cause psychological side effects such as hallucinations, insomnia, anxiety or paranoia. If these side effects become severe the patient may need to try a different medication that may have less of an effect on them. Suboxone is an alternative to methadone but it can have its own side effects as well.

Suboxone can have short term side effects such as nausea, dizziness, sweating, insomnia and irregular heartbeat. One of the most serious side effects that can sometimes occur with suboxone is respiratory depression which leads to shallow breathing and a lack of oxygen in the body. If this occurs the patient should seek medical help immediately and cease their use of the medication.

Addiction medication can be a useful way to help patients transition off of a chemical dependency. When side effects occur their doctor can recommend supplementary medications or switch them to an alternative that may have a more mild effect.