Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Recovery’ Category

Dealing with Negative Influences in Recovery

Posted on: May 27th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments


Dealing with Negative Influences in Recovery

Almost everyone has a person in their life that is a negative influence on them in some way. For people with addictions, they may have friends and drinking buddies who guide them down the wrong path and have prevented them from being healthy for a long time. While in recovery, these same friends might in denial of your choice to quit and will not want to let you grow.

It is important to be able to recognize negative influences especially when you are in the early stages of recovery. You do not want all your progress to be jeopardized by a friend who coaxes you into having just one drink or using again because they can’t cope with you changing. Their negativity about your recovery can bring you down and make you feel tempted at dangerous times.

There are certain signs that a person in your life may be a negative influence. If they seem critical of your efforts to improve yourself, are avoiding facing their own addiction, or guilt trip you about your sobriety then they are probably are not able to deal with your new lifestyle. It is important to have people in your life that give you positive feedback about your choice to become sober and are going to be there to support you.

When someone becomes too much of a negative influence sometimes the best solution is to have a direct conversation with them about their behavior. You will need to tell them that you are committed to your choice to recover and if they can’t stop pushing you in the wrong direction you will need to move on. Friends who care about you will agree to accept your choices and for those who can’t, you may have to distance yourself from them.

Employment During and After Rehab

Posted on: May 20th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Dealing with Negative Influences in Recovery

Having a job can be a crucial factor in a person’s ability to recover from a drug addiction. Gainful employment gives people a sense of purpose and makes it easier for them to stay focused on sobriety. However, in rehab, there can be certain challenges that need to be overcome in order to find a steady job.

People who were regularly employed before entering residential drug rehabilitation can focus on keeping their jobs. It is important to have a discussion with your boss before rehab and tell them about the situation so they know when you are leaving and when you will return. You have legal rights to remain employed while you take medical leave to resolve illnesses, including addiction.

For those that are unemployed at the time of entering a detox program, they can work towards being employed by the time they complete their rehab treatment. It can be very beneficial to have a job lined up before leaving treatment because it can ease some of the anxiety about living sober and coping with life’s daily challenges. Many rehab programs offer counseling and career services to help patients seek employment once they complete their time in treatment.

There are many reasons why working is crucial to recovery and each patient needs to find a steady job before returning home. Working provides financial stability, a daily routine, a sense of purpose, a structured schedule and many other benefits that create a healthier lifestyle. Someone who is working regularly will be in better shape mentally and emotionally to handle the daily challenges of being sober.

Recovery is a long process with many ups and downs so it is important to be prepared for sober living by having a set routine with work hours and a stable paycheck.

Just How Big is the Recovery Community?

Posted on: March 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Recovery Community

When someone is in recovery from an addiction, it is important not to feel isolated or disconnected from others. Fortunately it can be easy to connect with a recovery community in your city no matter where you are. Twelve step meetings and other kinds of recovery groups are available everywhere.

People struggling with addiction need to talk about what they are going through with others in recovery so that they can feel they are not alone. Having other people who can give you support, guidance and advice is necessary in order to get through the difficult times that you experience with addiction. A community can prevent you from feeling alone or being tempted to relapse.

The recovery community is not just in big cities or in specific areas, it is a worldwide network of people that can provide support anywhere. You can look up listings for AA meetings or other type of recovery groups in any city if you are traveling and need to be able to talk to someone about what you are going through. Having a group to help you anywhere can make it easier to stay sober when you are on vacation or traveling for work.

Knowing that there is a recovery community to help you anywhere you are can give you an idea of how big the community really is. There are people working to maintain their sobriety all over the world and you can always find someone willing to give you support and advice no matter what you are going through. Staying connected to this recovery community can make sobriety a more rewarding and personal experience.

If you need to connect to a recovery community then look for local AA meetings, other twelve step groups or non-twelve step support meetings in your area.

Can You Recover if You’re Constantly Blaming Others?

Posted on: February 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Can You Recover if You’re Constantly Blaming Others?

Addiction can often cloud a person’s judgement and they may find it hard to be fully aware of their own illness. They can live in very deep denial for a long time and fail to see how their actions are hurting other people. Some may even find it easier to blame other people for their problems instead of taking responsibility for their own choices.

Shifting blame onto others is a common problem for people in recovery because it can be painful to confront your own mistakes. There are a lot of feelings of shame and failure surrounding addiction and it becomes much easier to blame other people or life circumstances instead of facing reality. It is important for people in recovery to stop placing blame on others and take ownership of their actions as difficult as it may be.

Accepting that you have made all your own choices can be painful but it helps addicts to finally acknowledge their disease. When they understand that some of their problems are related to their own choices they will have to start taking steps to change. Those who are shifting the blame elsewhere are finding a way to avoid changing their actions.

Understanding that you need to make changes and that your addiction is the problem can help people get through their state of denial. When they see that their own actions are to blame they can finally accept that they need help to quit their addiction. Getting through denial is one of the first and most important steps to starting a recovery journey.

It may take time for an addict to stop blaming others as it is a habit they have developed to shield themselves from embarrassment and pain. Accepting blame for their own actions, however, is a crucial part of recovery.  

Having a Dry (Alcohol-Free) Home

Posted on: February 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Having a Dry (Alcohol-Free) Home

Whenever someone goes through recovery for an alcohol addiction, it is important for them to be very cautious about the possibility of relapse. This includes minimizing possible triggers and avoiding situations where they might be tempted to drink. It then goes without saying that it is crucial to live in a completely alcohol-free home.

Having alcohol around in the refrigerator or seeing other people drink it at home can be a very strong temptation and very dangerous for sobriety. For people in recovery who live with roommates, family members or spouses who still drink they will need to talk to them about keeping a dry home. It is an important conversation to have to ensure that everyone is on the same page and they will not jeopardize an alcoholic’s progress that they have made.

Keeping a dry home doesn’t mean that your roommates or spouse can never drink but they should never have alcohol in the house. Having beers in the fridge or a bottle of wine in the cabinet can be too much and is not respectful to you and your needs. You should be able to come to an agreement with the people you live with about how to maintain an alcohol-free home and what boundaries need to be in place.

When it comes to entertaining guests it is still crucial to keep your home alcohol-free. If friends come over and want to drink you will need to be straightforward and honest about your policy to keep a sober home. Make sure to tell people in advance that they should not bring alcohol so that you don’t end up in a complicated situation.

Keeping an alcohol-free home can be simple as long as your friends and the people living in your home support your decision.