Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Addiction’ Category

The Newest Sober App – a Smartphone Breathalyzer

Posted on: April 21st, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
The Newest Sober App - a Smartphone Breathalyzer

Technological advances are making it possible to stay accountable while you are in recovery.  A new smartphone app allows people to take a breathalyzer test that will help ensure that their blood alcohol level is at a safe level. The new app called BACtrack can be useful for people who have quit drinking alcohol and need their sponsors or family members to check their sobriety level.

When people are struggling with an addiction they can get wrapped up in a lot of lies and deception that becomes a habit for them. In order for friends,sponsors and family members to know for sure that someone is sober they can periodically take a breathalyzer using the app to hold themselves accountable. Someone who is monitoring an addict in recovery can set a testing schedule using the app to check in on how the person is doing.

The app can be helpful for people in treatment that need to be able to prove to others in their sober living program that they are staying sober. Knowing that they have to take a breathalyzer test can also help motivate them to stay sober and keep them in check throughout their recovery. It can be helpful for peace of mind especially for spouses or other loved ones that are concerned about the addict’s ability to remain sober.

Those using the app will breathe into a device connected to the app which will measure their blood alcohol level. They can also take a photo of themselves to prove that it is really them taking the test. They can send both the photo and the results to the person monitoring them so they can evaluate it.

The use of these kinds of apps can help make the process of recovery smoother and also build trust among the people in an addict’s life.

What are “The Stages of Changes” in Addiction?

Posted on: March 8th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
What are “the Stages of Changes” in Addiction?

Most people that have gone through recovery understand that quitting an addiction is not something that happens immediately when you give up drinking or using drugs. Abstinence is only the first step in a very long process that requires lots of different physical, emotional and spiritual changes. Most recovery programs identify six main stages of change that can help bring about permanent sobriety.

The first stage of change is the “pre-contemplation stage” where the addict may still be in denial and not yet understand all the negative consequences of their actions. They may soon move on to the “contemplation stage” where they will start to become aware of all the problems that their substance abuse is causing and think about quitting but not yet fully commit to the idea. The third stage is “preparation” in which the individual will finally make the decision to change and begin planning the steps for their recovery.

During stage four or the “action” phase the person will start taking steps toward change by entering detox or rehab where they will learn how to choose new behaviors and develop life skills. Once they complete rehab they enter the “maintentance” stage where they will work on their long-term sobriety plan and focus on relapse prevention tactics. The final stage is “termination” where the individual accepts their new image as a sober person and appreciates their new healthy lifestyle.

The stages of change model was developed as a way to explain the typical steps that a person in recovery has to go through until they are able to feel comfortable in their abstinence. Recovery is different for everyone and they may go through each stage at their own pace or even move backward and forward through each phase until they are ready to be completely sober.

The Rural vs Urban Opioid Crisis

Posted on: March 2nd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
The Rural vs Urban Opioid Crisis

As the opioid epidemic continues to grow, researchers are beginning to recognize trends in how abuse and overdose affect different areas throughout the country. Opioid addiction is more dramatically affecting people living in rural areas rather than those in urban cities especially when it comes to prescription opioids. Older adults in rural areas are more frequently dealing with addiction and fatal overdoses than those in other parts of the country.

One of the reasons opioids have hit rural areas so hard is that people living these areas have nearly two times the odds of being prescribed opioids than those in urban cities. Studies have revealed that even though opioid prescriptions have been declining overall they still remain relatively high in rural areas. People in rural counties actually have an 87 percent higher chance of receiving an opioid prescription compared with people in metropolitan areas.

Prescription habits among primary care doctors may be at least partially to blame for the differences in prescription addiction in rural areas. Rural adults tend to be the ones that experience the highest rates of opioid issues and more are being hospitalized on a regular basis for their problems with prescription painkillers. Physicians in rural counties are often providing these kinds of drugs for people with pain problems because they feel they may not have the time or resources to get physical therapy or surgery.

There are also many barriers for people in rural areas to receive the treatment they need for addiction because they may have to travel long distances or experience long wait times to getting help. It may be more difficult for them to get the support they need to recover. It is important to establish more access to care for people in rural areas and to prevent rural doctors from overprescribing opioids in order to effectively reduce the opioid crisis.

Why Addicts Lie

Posted on: January 25th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Why Addicts Lie

When someone has an addiction, their behavior may change dramatically and they will begin to act in ways they never had before. They might lie, steal, cheat or break the law because they will do anything to be able to continue their addictions. Addicts usually develop a habit of lying to loved ones because they are looking for ways to avoid having to reveal the extent of their problem and be forced to change their ways.

One of the major issues that causes addicts to lie is that they are trying to avoid confrontation with the people around them. They often haven’t developed coping strategies to deal with the stresses of life such as conflict with others. The easiest way out for them is to simply lie so they won’t have to deal with an argument or cope with a problem.

Addicts tend to lie about the extent of how much they are abusing drugs because they don’t want other people to express their concern or try to convince them to quit. They might lie about going to the bar or meeting up with their dealer because they don’t want to have to explain their behavior to others. Their ultimate goal is to continue using drugs and they will say and do what they feel is necessary to keep going.

Another reason that addicts tend to lie is because deep down they feel ashamed about their behavior. Even though their addiction forces them to continue using drugs, they may feel embarrassed for people to know what they are doing. They are afraid of being judged or facing up to their own mistakes so they will lie to others to avoid confronting their own shame.

Going along with an addict’s lies can be a form of enabling so it is important to eventually speak directly to them about getting help through an intervention.

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

Posted on: December 19th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

When someone in the family has an addiction, loved ones often feel helpless and don’t know what to do to change their behavior. Sometimes the addict reaches their lowest point and may end up on the street, homeless because their addiction has become out of control. If this happens, it is crucial for the family to step in and help them recover before their situation gets worse.

Homeless people very frequently suffer from drug or alcohol addiction and the prognosis for living on the street for an addict is not good. They could get into dangerous situations and their health and wellbeing will suffer greatly. Loved ones might feel panicked and afraid when they find out that a family member is homeless and their initial reaction may be to take them into their home.

However, the first thing to think about when helping a family member from homelessness is how to address their addiction. Once you make sure they are safe, it is then time to start researching shelters and recovery programs that are designed to help homeless people with addictions. Getting them into some kind of treatment should be your first priority once you get them off of the street.

Once you do some research into the best treatment plan for them, make sure to drop them off and accompany them when they enter the facility. Since they most likely have hit rock bottom as a result of their homelessness, they may already understand how important it is for them to quit their substance abuse. It can also be helpful to check in on their progress, attend family therapy sessions and be supportive throughout their recovery program.

When an addict becomes homeless, they are at their most desperate point and need your help. Most importantly they also need professional treatment to get back on their feet.