Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Addiction’ Category

Why Addicts Lie

Posted on: January 25th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Why Addicts Lie

When someone has an addiction, their behavior may change dramatically and they will begin to act in ways they never had before. They might lie, steal, cheat or break the law because they will do anything to be able to continue their addictions. Addicts usually develop a habit of lying to loved ones because they are looking for ways to avoid having to reveal the extent of their problem and be forced to change their ways.

One of the major issues that causes addicts to lie is that they are trying to avoid confrontation with the people around them. They often haven’t developed coping strategies to deal with the stresses of life such as conflict with others. The easiest way out for them is to simply lie so they won’t have to deal with an argument or cope with a problem.

Addicts tend to lie about the extent of how much they are abusing drugs because they don’t want other people to express their concern or try to convince them to quit. They might lie about going to the bar or meeting up with their dealer because they don’t want to have to explain their behavior to others. Their ultimate goal is to continue using drugs and they will say and do what they feel is necessary to keep going.

Another reason that addicts tend to lie is because deep down they feel ashamed about their behavior. Even though their addiction forces them to continue using drugs, they may feel embarrassed for people to know what they are doing. They are afraid of being judged or facing up to their own mistakes so they will lie to others to avoid confronting their own shame.

Going along with an addict’s lies can be a form of enabling so it is important to eventually speak directly to them about getting help through an intervention.

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

Posted on: December 19th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

When someone in the family has an addiction, loved ones often feel helpless and don’t know what to do to change their behavior. Sometimes the addict reaches their lowest point and may end up on the street, homeless because their addiction has become out of control. If this happens, it is crucial for the family to step in and help them recover before their situation gets worse.

Homeless people very frequently suffer from drug or alcohol addiction and the prognosis for living on the street for an addict is not good. They could get into dangerous situations and their health and wellbeing will suffer greatly. Loved ones might feel panicked and afraid when they find out that a family member is homeless and their initial reaction may be to take them into their home.

However, the first thing to think about when helping a family member from homelessness is how to address their addiction. Once you make sure they are safe, it is then time to start researching shelters and recovery programs that are designed to help homeless people with addictions. Getting them into some kind of treatment should be your first priority once you get them off of the street.

Once you do some research into the best treatment plan for them, make sure to drop them off and accompany them when they enter the facility. Since they most likely have hit rock bottom as a result of their homelessness, they may already understand how important it is for them to quit their substance abuse. It can also be helpful to check in on their progress, attend family therapy sessions and be supportive throughout their recovery program.

When an addict becomes homeless, they are at their most desperate point and need your help. Most importantly they also need professional treatment to get back on their feet.

Addiction and Memory Loss

Posted on: December 8th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Addiction and Memory Loss

Drug abuse can have a devastating effect on a person’s personal life as well as their physical well-being. Repeated abuse of alcohol and other drugs can cause damage to essential functions in the body, especially in the brain. Addicts who have been abusing drugs for many years often experience memory loss and other problems with their cognitive functioning.

Hundreds of studies show a significant link between substance abuse and memory loss which as a result affects things like learning, language and comprehension. When a person experiences a blackout during alcohol or drug use, for example, it prevents the brain from completing the process of forming memories. Persistent drug use can cause not only issues with recalling recent events but also long term memory loss.

Drug use affects the hippocampus which is essentially the brain’s memory-storage system. Someone who becomes heavily dependent on drugs like alcohol will start to see long-lasting effects to their memory and brain function. They may begin to struggle with learning new things and have trouble recalling details such as birthdays and other important dates.

In some of the worst cases of addiction, people can develop serious brain damage leading conditions such as dementia. This typically occurs with excessive drinking over a long period of time and deals with issues of memory, learning and cognitive skills. Alcoholic dementia is a serious condition that is difficult and nearly impossible to reverse in some cases.

For people that are struggling with an addiction and are starting to experience some memory loss it is crucial to quit so that they can reverse some of the damage to their brain. Once sober, most addicts can start to see their cognitive function improve gradually over time. Getting treatment can help prevent further substance abuse from damaging memory and learning beyond repair.

It Gets Better

Posted on: November 22nd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

It Gets Better

Even though facing an addiction may seem hopeless, there are many opportunities to work toward a better future. Only people who have experienced addiction firsthand will understand the destructive toll it takes on your life. When you have hit rock bottom it can be difficult to see any light at the end of the tunnel but for most people who manage to get help, things will ultimately get better.

The image surrounding addiction, especially in Hollywood, is often of the addict who can’t escape their own self-destructive tendencies and they are never able to recover. Recent films like “A Star is Born” show a main character who is destroyed by his addiction and never gets the opportunity to try to fully live sober. Even though these kinds of tragedies do occur, the majority of people who receive treatment for addiction are able to survive and lead healthy lives.

One of the biggest issues with addiction is the significant stigma that people experience with the disease. In that sense it is different than any other disease that has its normal ups and downs. When people relapse and their disease worsens temporarily, they are judged very harshly by society in a way that can jeopardize their ability to recover.

Even when someone relapses, if they are able to get the support that they need it doesn’t mean that they have failed in their recovery. As with any disease, continuing treatment can mean that it gets easier every time as they work toward permanent sobriety. Going back to treatment after a relapse is often a normal part of the process.

Although addiction is sometimes stigmatized and portrayed harshly in the media, most people find that they can become healthy and sober with the right treatment and support from peers, friends and family.

Parenting an Adult Addict

Posted on: November 14th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Parenting an Adult Addict

The responsibility of being a parent may never completely end, even after children reach adulthood and leave home to lead their own lives. Being a parent means always trying to lead your son or daughter in the right direction especially when they are making very dangerous or unhealthy choices. When your adult child develops an addiction, it is often your responsibility as well as your desire as a parent to try to help them.

Parenting an adult addict can be difficult because you no longer can control their actions or tell them what to do. Some parents may worry too much for their child’s well being and end up enabling them by getting them out of financial problems caused by their addiction. As a parent you need to learn the lines between stepping to help them and enabling them to continue their addictive behavior.

One problem that parents might experience is the feeling of guilt that can go along with having a child who is an addict. Their child might blame them for what they have become and the parent might feel ashamed of mistakes they made while raising them. It is important to understand that once a child reaches adulthood, their decisions are their own and it is not your fault that they have an addiction.

As a parent you need to avoid enabling your child but also be able to offer them love and support while encouraging them to get help. If possible, stage an intervention with other family members and loved ones who are concerned about their addiction. You need to try your best to still remain in their life but also protect yourself and others in the family from their misdeeds.

Having a child who is an addict is never easy, no matter what their age but with the right approach you can help motivate them to become sober.