Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Dealing With Self-Loathing

Dealing With Self-Loathing

Feelings of self-loathing can sabotage relationships because one person may feel that they are not “good enough” to be with other people. Those who cope with self-loathing can sometimes become isolated because they see so many negative qualities in themselves and assume that others will eventually see them. Someone who is hyper-aware of their limitations or perceived flaws can never be convinced of their worth unless they confront the cause of their self-loathing.

It can be difficult for people with self-esteem issues to build up confidence since compliments from others might have very little effect. A good tactic for people with self-loathing issues is to try to acknowledge that they might not know themselves as well as they believe. Although they might feel that they see and understand all of their own flaws, the reality is that the way they perceive themselves is often very inaccurate.

If someone who is a self-loather can learn to understand that the way they see themselves is not necessarily the “right” way then it opens up the possibility that they might not be as flawed as they think. They might see themselves as boring, worthless or untalented but others might see them as interesting and fun. Considering other people’s perspectives can help break down some of the deeply ingrained beliefs that affect their self-esteem.

People with self-loathing issues can also work on accepting praise from others and recognizing the ways in which they are supported and loved. Other people in their lives see their value and if they are able to understand that then it can start to change their perception of themselves. With time they can start to see their own positive qualities and allow themselves more self-care.

Self-loathing is a complex problem, but it is possible to reduce feelings of self-hatred through therapy and changing perspectives.

Addiction and Memory Loss

Addiction and Memory Loss

Drug abuse can have a devastating effect on a person’s personal life as well as their physical well-being. Repeated abuse of alcohol and other drugs can cause damage to essential functions in the body, especially in the brain. Addicts who have been abusing drugs for many years often experience memory loss and other problems with their cognitive functioning.

Hundreds of studies show a significant link between substance abuse and memory loss which as a result affects things like learning, language and comprehension. When a person experiences a blackout during alcohol or drug use, for example, it prevents the brain from completing the process of forming memories. Persistent drug use can cause not only issues with recalling recent events but also long term memory loss.

Drug use affects the hippocampus which is essentially the brain’s memory-storage system. Someone who becomes heavily dependent on drugs like alcohol will start to see long-lasting effects to their memory and brain function. They may begin to struggle with learning new things and have trouble recalling details such as birthdays and other important dates.

In some of the worst cases of addiction, people can develop serious brain damage leading conditions such as dementia. This typically occurs with excessive drinking over a long period of time and deals with issues of memory, learning and cognitive skills. Alcoholic dementia is a serious condition that is difficult and nearly impossible to reverse in some cases.

For people that are struggling with an addiction and are starting to experience some memory loss it is crucial to quit so that they can reverse some of the damage to their brain. Once sober, most addicts can start to see their cognitive function improve gradually over time. Getting treatment can help prevent further substance abuse from damaging memory and learning beyond repair.

What Constitutes a Nervous Breakdown

What Constitutes a Nervous Breakdown

Most people have heard about someone having a breakdown but may feel unclear about what that means and what takes place when that happens. A nervous breakdown is essentially a period of intense mental distress that interferes with a person’s ability to function normally in their daily life. Although the phrase “nervous breakdown” is not technically a medical term, it can still be used to describe serious symptoms of stress that are causing social and physical impairment.

The signs of a nervous breakdown can be physical, mental and behavioral as all aspects of a person’s health may be affected. When someone has a breakdown they can have mental illness symptoms such as depression and anxiety as well as physical symptoms such as muscle tension, shaking or upset stomach. They may also behave differently such as avoiding social functions, eating poorly, isolating themselves or not showing up to work.

When someone has a nervous breakdown they may also experience issues such as panic attacks, hallucinations, extreme mood swings, paranoia, flashbacks of a traumatic event or other symptoms. The things that a person goes through during a nervous breakdown can depend on the cause of their breakdown and other factors such as history of mental illness or genetic vulnerabilities. Causes of a nervous breakdown can vary from person to person but common factors can be – work stress, recent trauma, serious financial issues, life changes such a divorce or loss, injury or illness, and mental health problems.

The good news is that even though a nervous breakdown can be devastating, it is possible to recover and pull out of it. Professional treatment allows people the opportunity to understand the cause of their breakdown and work on strategies to improve their health. Individual and alternative therapies combined can be effective at treating the symptoms of a breakdown.

What are Mental Health Triggers?

What are Mental Health Triggers?

Someone who suffers from a mental illness may not always experience their symptoms except in certain circumstances. People with mental health problems often have specific triggers that produce their symptoms or worsen them. It is normal for people to react to triggers but it is important to get help and support before the triggers lead to a downward spiral or a mental health episode.

Patients receiving treatment for a mental illness such as anxiety, depression or bipolar disorder will all have certain mental health triggers. During treatment they will need to learn to identify their own personal triggers so that they can prevent an episode or have a plan in place if symptoms do occur. Becoming familiar with triggers can make them more manageable so that they don’t control your mental well being when they come up.

Triggers can differ between each individual but some common triggers include stress, frightening news events, break ups with a significant other, family conflict, anniversary dates of a trauma, financial problems, being judged or teased, spending too much time alone and many others. When someone who has a mental illness experiences one of these triggers they may suddenly become very depressed or anxious and find that they are having trouble coping with their normal daily tasks.

It is crucial to develop a plan for how to deal with these kinds of triggers so that they don’t worsen symptoms too severely. Patients can make a list of actions or activities that help them minimize the effects of triggers such as going for a walk, talking to a friend, practicing relaxation exercises, or writing in a journal. As long as you know certain tactics that can help alleviate some of your symptoms quickly, you can prevent triggers from disrupting your normal routine.

It Gets Better

It Gets Better

Even though facing an addiction may seem hopeless, there are many opportunities to work toward a better future. Only people who have experienced addiction firsthand will understand the destructive toll it takes on your life. When you have hit rock bottom it can be difficult to see any light at the end of the tunnel but for most people who manage to get help, things will ultimately get better.

The image surrounding addiction, especially in Hollywood, is often of the addict who can’t escape their own self-destructive tendencies and they are never able to recover. Recent films like “A Star is Born” show a main character who is destroyed by his addiction and never gets the opportunity to try to fully live sober. Even though these kinds of tragedies do occur, the majority of people who receive treatment for addiction are able to survive and lead healthy lives.

One of the biggest issues with addiction is the significant stigma that people experience with the disease. In that sense it is different than any other disease that has its normal ups and downs. When people relapse and their disease worsens temporarily, they are judged very harshly by society in a way that can jeopardize their ability to recover.

Even when someone relapses, if they are able to get the support that they need it doesn’t mean that they have failed in their recovery. As with any disease, continuing treatment can mean that it gets easier every time as they work toward permanent sobriety. Going back to treatment after a relapse is often a normal part of the process.

Although addiction is sometimes stigmatized and portrayed harshly in the media, most people find that they can become healthy and sober with the right treatment and support from peers, friends and family.