Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Alcoholism’ Category

The Role of Genetics in Alcoholism

Posted on: May 22nd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
The Role of Genetics in Alcoholism

Addiction tends to run in families for a few different reasons but genetic predisposition is one of the most common causes of problems like alcoholism. The environment and culture that a person grows up in can influence them to drink and use drugs but their genes can also have a powerful effect. Certain distinct sets of genes can also determine whether someone will be a heavy drinker or if they will suffer from alcohol abuse disorder.

People who drink heavily and those who are alcoholics have many genetic similarities that make them more inclined to use substances. There are distinct regions of their genes that are associated with both groups of people and there are five that are linked to alcoholism alone. The genetic variants that are specifically linked with alcoholism tend to be associated with neuronal function.

The gene variants that are associated with alcoholism are also closely connected with the genetic risk of developing other types of psychiatric disorders. This may play a role in the likelihood of someone developing both an addiction and a mental illness such as depression or anxiety. Research has revealed that overall, genetics can account for about half of the risk of developing alcoholism.

Understanding the role that genetics play in alcohol abuse disorder and other psychiatric disorders can help people prevent or manage potential illnesses. If you are aware of a genetic predisposition for alcoholism or other types of disorders then you can take measures to avoid developing these issues through abstinence, therapy and other types of lifestyle changes.

Although genetics can be a strong influence on a person’s tendency to develop addiction, their lifestyle and personal choices are the key to whether they can manage their vulnerability. Alcoholism rehab can help people who have genetic vulnerabilities to recover and learn to live sober in spite of their inherent risks.

Socializing with People When You Don’t Drink

Posted on: February 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Socializing with People When You Don’t Drink

When you are in recovery it can be challenging to maintain your commitment to sobriety, especially in social situations. Your coworkers might want to go out to get drinks after work or you might get invited to a party where everyone is drinking heavily. These situations don’t mean that you can’t socialize or have to remain isolated from people who drink, you simply need to develop strategies to handle it.

There can be a lot of awkward moments when you hang out with people who drink and you are sober. When someone offers you a beer or asks why you aren’t joining in you might feel uncomfortable. It can be helpful to have a plan in place so that you know how to respond to questions, cope with your feelings and safely get out of the situation if you should start feeling triggered.

You should have a prepared response for when people offer you a drink or ask about why you are sober. You don’t necessarily need to talk about your recovery if you don’t want to. You can tell them that you aren’t drinking today or that you are driving so you can’t drink which can easily and quickly end the conversation.

If you find social situations where alcohol is involved too uncomfortable you can bring a sober friend with you to make you feel less alienated. You can talk to them about what you are experiencing and they will understand and feel the same. Remember that you can always call a friend, arrange to get a ride home or leave early if you are feeling too upset or tempted to drink.

Being sober doesn’t mean completely giving up your social life, but it does mean that you need to be cautious and mentally prepared for situations where alcohol is involved.

Change Your Relationship with Alcohol

Posted on: February 22nd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Changing Relationship Alcohol

For many Americans, drinking alcohol has become a part of daily life. People drink after work, on the weekends, during holidays and celebrations. Therefore changing drinking patterns requires changing some aspects in a persons lifestyle. However, making these adjustments with your relationship to alcohol can change your life for the better and transform your health.

There are many reasons that alcohol can have negative consequences on your life even if you don’t drink regularly and wouldn’t consider yourself addicted. Alcohol takes its toll on the body and causes changes in the brain. It can lead to mood changes, depression, anxiety and a number of physical health issues.

The relationship that people have with alcohol can be harmful to their well-being too especially if they are mentally dependent on it. They may start to believe that they can’t have a good time, relax after work or feel comfortable socializing without having some drinks. That dependent relationship with alcohol can make you feel powerless and too focused on the act of drinking rather than experiencing life as it is.

Changing your relationship with alcohol means learning to find other ways to have fun and feel calm and relaxed that are healthier for your mind and body. Instead of seeing alcohol as the only means to achieve a certain state of mind, you can explore other options that will not have the same negative consequences. When you cut down or completely quit drinking you can discover the other things that life has to offer without relying on alcohol to fulfill your needs.

Without alcohol you can enjoy better physical and mental health, more freedom and a more positive perspective. Drinking can limit you in ways that you don’t realize until you rid yourself of a dependency on alcohol.

Do You Need Anger Management or AA?

Posted on: February 18th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Do You Need Anger Management or AA?

Everyone experiences anger from time to time but in certain cases, feelings of anger can become problematic. When someone has frequent emotional outbursts of anger or feel that they can’t control what they say or do when they are angry then it may be a sign of a disorder. If anger seems overwhelming and leads to a lot of negative consequences and broken relationships then it may be a sign of an anger disorder.

People with substance abuse issues frequently also deal with anger problems as the two are often related. Someone with anger problems might drink to ease their feelings or their more aggressive side may be revealed when they drink. When both issues are connected it may be important to go to both anger management and alcohol treatment.

Some people with alcohol issues can become violent when they drink, especially if they have anger control issues. Quitting alcohol will be a crucial part of coping with their anger and minimizing the consequences of their angry outbursts. In the same way, someone who is trying to become sober will need to address their anger issues that may be driving them to drink.

Those dealing with anger issues often have emotional difficulties that they are having a hard time resolving. They may suppress many of their feelings, believing them to be inappropriate. As these feelings build up they may eventually be expressed as uncontrollable anger in an outburst of rage.

Anyone struggling with anger issues should get treatment from an anger management center that can provide them with strategies and skills to cope with their anger. An alcohol problem that is connected to anger issues also needs to be addressed in order to achieve improved mental wellness. Therapy, anger management and AA meetings can all be useful in healing from anger problems.

Having a Dry (Alcohol-Free) Home

Posted on: February 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Having a Dry (Alcohol-Free) Home

Whenever someone goes through recovery for an alcohol addiction, it is important for them to be very cautious about the possibility of relapse. This includes minimizing possible triggers and avoiding situations where they might be tempted to drink. It then goes without saying that it is crucial to live in a completely alcohol-free home.

Having alcohol around in the refrigerator or seeing other people drink it at home can be a very strong temptation and very dangerous for sobriety. For people in recovery who live with roommates, family members or spouses who still drink they will need to talk to them about keeping a dry home. It is an important conversation to have to ensure that everyone is on the same page and they will not jeopardize an alcoholic’s progress that they have made.

Keeping a dry home doesn’t mean that your roommates or spouse can never drink but they should never have alcohol in the house. Having beers in the fridge or a bottle of wine in the cabinet can be too much and is not respectful to you and your needs. You should be able to come to an agreement with the people you live with about how to maintain an alcohol-free home and what boundaries need to be in place.

When it comes to entertaining guests it is still crucial to keep your home alcohol-free. If friends come over and want to drink you will need to be straightforward and honest about your policy to keep a sober home. Make sure to tell people in advance that they should not bring alcohol so that you don’t end up in a complicated situation.

Keeping an alcohol-free home can be simple as long as your friends and the people living in your home support your decision.