Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Alcoholism’ Category

Alcohol Abuse and Insomnia

Posted on: August 5th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Abuse for Insomnia

It is common for people who abuse alcohol to experience disrupted sleep and end up in a vicious cycle of insomnia and addiction. Sleep disorders and substance abuse often go hand in hand as mind altering chemicals can make it harder for the body to function normally and get the rest it needs. Sleep problems tend to exacerbate substance abuse and vice versa because the two problems are so closely related.

For someone that doesn’t have a sleep disorder, they will typically experience regular patterns in their periods of sleep and go through the two phases of REM and non-REM sleep. The process of sleep is dictated by an interaction of chemicals in the brain including norepinephrine and serotonin. Alcohol abuse can affect the level of chemicals in your brain which can begin to disrupt sleep patterns and lead to insomnia.

People with insomnia might be able to fall asleep initially be self-medicating with alcohol but over time it will make it harder for them to maintain regular sleeping patterns. Alcohol is actually one of the most commonly used substances for insomnia with 28 percent of those with the sleep disorder using alcohol to help them fall asleep. People with insomnia are also more likely to develop issues with alcoholism.

In order to recover from an alcohol addiction it is important to treat issues of insomnia as the two problems can influence one another. An addict in recovery will need to address their sleep disorder as having disrupted sleep can trigger cravings and a potential relapse. There are many methods for improving sleep patterns such as the use of supplements, relaxation techniques and getting the right amount of nutrition and exercise.

One of the most important things a person can do for their health and their sleep is to maintain their sobriety. Fortunately quitting alcohol abuse and living a healthier lifestyle may significantly improve sleep patterns.

Substance Abuse Among Culinary Chefs

Posted on: June 12th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Substance Abuse Among Culinary Chefs

While cooking and creating dishes can be a fulfilling passion for most chefs, it can also be a stressful and high pressure industry. Many culinary chefs, especially students in training and chefs in high end restaurants, end up turning to substance abuse as a way to cope with the pressure that they experience in the kitchen. In an environment surrounded by plenty of alcohol as well as mental and emotional tension, it is not surprising that chefs end up self-medicating on the job.

The food industry has been known to have a party reputation as staff members often share shots and drinks after hours and even sometimes on the clock. Hospitality industry workers actually make up a significant portion of the people receiving addiction treatment in rehab programs. Staying sober or even drinking moderately can be especially challenging in a restaurant environment and chefs are often hit the hardest by addiction.

Chefs and other restaurant employees are working in a place where drinking on the job is normal and often encouraged. They may come into contact with so many people who have addiction issues that they often lose their sense of what typical behavior is. Other drugs are also an issue in the restaurant industry as chefs and staff members may use cocaine or other stimulants to help them get through a long shift.

Although the restaurant industry is associated with a certain lifestyle it is possible for chefs in recovery to find others who are in a similar situation. Having other restaurant employees around who don’t drink or use drugs can be beneficial for those who are trying to commit to being sober. It can be challenging for chefs to cope with stress and temptation in a restaurant environment but with enough support they can make healthier choices.

Brett Favre was Abusing Alcohol During the Prime of NFL Career

Posted on: June 5th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Brett Favre was Abusing Alcohol During the Prime of NFL Career

Legendary athlete Brett Favre has had an amazing career with the NFL but his success did not stop him from struggling with dark times and issues of addiction. The former Green Bay Packers quarterback spent 3 stints in rehab as he fought an addiction to both alcohol and painkillers. Throughout his time in the NFL, Favre recovered and relapsed several times while the public was mostly unaware.

Favre first entered rehab in 1996 when he was at the height of his fame and success with the Packers to address his problems with drinking and addiction to Vicodin. He has said that at one point he took 12 tablets of Vicodin at a time. At the time he wasn’t convinced that he had a problem but was talked into going to rehab by people in his life that were concerned about his drinking and asked him to attend.

The football star was resistant to treatment in his first rehab stay and found it too hard to admit that he had an issue with alcohol. Even after 28 days of treatment during his first stay he ended up in rehab again several years later after relapsing. His third and final stay in rehab finally helped him realize that he needed to change his ways as he found it difficult to make it through normal social situations without having several drinks.

His days of drinking and abusing painkillers are behind him after he began to understand how it was affecting his personal life. Now that Favre is sober he has since retired from football in the NFL which he played for nearly 20 years. He was a hard working athlete who played 321 straight games during his career which is a record for a quarterback.

Alcoholism and Masculinity

Posted on: May 10th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

 

Alcoholism and Masculinity

Alcoholism and Masculinity

Historically, alcohol abuse has always been more prevalent among males than females although recent statistics have been slightly shifting. Overall, men tend to become addicted to alcohol more often than women and they tend to binge drink in greater amounts. There is an intricate relationship between alcohol and masculinity as many men feel they must drink alcohol and large amounts of it to prove their manhood or affirm that they are masculine.

Social drinking has traditionally for many years been a cultural symbol of manliness which is often strengthened by media portrayals of alcohol and men. Some theories express that men with alcohol dependencies actually have the most fragile masculine identities that they are attempting to boost by heavy binge drinking.

Male Culture and Social Drinking

Studies show that men not only consume more alcohol but they also have higher frequencies of intoxication and are more likely to form a dependency than women. Certain male subculture and environments tend to encourage excessive drinking such as Greek fraternities which support the notion that alcohol is a rite of passage for men.

Men who are able to drink large amounts of alcohol without much of a physical reaction are considered more manly than those who become sick or cannot handle their booze. Alcohol abuse and a high tolerance then becomes a way to prove masculinity in many male social circles. Research has shown that men who adhere to many of these kinds of masculine norms are actually more vulnerable to peer pressure and are insecure about proving themselves.

Masculinity and the need to adhere to masculine norms can be harmful in a number of different ways. Men who try to conform to strict male codes often experience heightened psychological strain and burden that can exacerbate their alcohol abuse. Drinking alcohol then, serves as a method of both proving their masculinity and an emotional escape from the strain of adhering to these types of male norms. The male norms and codes then appear to be closely linked to alcohol abuse among many men who struggle with their own masculinity.

Men who value other qualities such as self reliance and control may be better equipped to minimize their drinking behavior. On the other hand, men who focus more on physical strength and ability to handle substances will be more likely to test their limits and consume more alcohol than others. In many cases, these are the men who develop dependencies and struggle the most with addiction.

Top Netflix Movies/TV Shows About Addiction

Posted on: May 9th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

 

Netflix

There is more content than ever in the media that deals realistically with issues of addiction and depicts the struggles of recovery, relapse and the sometimes harrowing experiences of substance abuse. Netflix offers some hard-hitting dramas, documentaries and even comedies that discuss addiction and include characters that are relatable protagonists who are vulnerable to their own relationship to alcohol or drugs. The most effective stories of addiction in the media can show both the redemption of recovery and the dangers of falling into the pattern of abuse. These are some of the best movies and TV shows available on Netflix that deal with addiction.

Heaven Knows What

Ben and Joshua Safdie directed this dark drama centered around junkies surviving on the streets of New York City. This is a remarkable film in that it stars a real life former heroin addict discovered by the directors and many of her own experiences were used as inspiration for the story including her relationship with her boyfriend Ilya who died of an overdose in Central Park. Although at times painful to watch because of the subject matter, the gritty realism makes this a memorable depiction of addiction.

White Girl

This movie follows the story of a young college student who becomes entangled in substance abuse and the NY drug world after falling in love with a cocaine dealer. Cocaine begins to take over her life as she descends deeper into addiction and struggles to make enough money selling drugs to get her boyfriend out of jail. The film also takes a hard look at issues of race and privilege that can dictate who experiences more repercussions for using and selling drugs.

Flaked

Will Arnett co-created, wrote and directed this Netflix comedy/drama series which largely draws on his own experiences with alcoholism and divorce while living in Venice, CA. The show depicts the main characters regularly attending AA meetings throughout the series and coping with their sometimes tenuous relationship with sobriety. Arnett maintains some mystery about the main character’s past which draws you into his story and struggles with alcohol.

Too Young to Die

This documentary series focuses on the stories of beloved celebrities whose lives were cut short, many of them due to addiction and overdose. Episodes of the series discuss stars like Kurt Cobain, Philip Seymour Hoffman, John Belushi and Heath Ledger who were all unable to escape their drug abuse until it eventually turned fatal.