Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

map Pasadena Drug Rehab Center for Men

Archive for the ‘Alcoholism’ Category

Do You Need Anger Management or AA?

Posted on: February 18th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Do You Need Anger Management or AA?

Everyone experiences anger from time to time but in certain cases, feelings of anger can become problematic. When someone has frequent emotional outbursts of anger or feel that they can’t control what they say or do when they are angry then it may be a sign of a disorder. If anger seems overwhelming and leads to a lot of negative consequences and broken relationships then it may be a sign of an anger disorder.

People with substance abuse issues frequently also deal with anger problems as the two are often related. Someone with anger problems might drink to ease their feelings or their more aggressive side may be revealed when they drink. When both issues are connected it may be important to go to both anger management and alcohol treatment.

Some people with alcohol issues can become violent when they drink, especially if they have anger control issues. Quitting alcohol will be a crucial part of coping with their anger and minimizing the consequences of their angry outbursts. In the same way, someone who is trying to become sober will need to address their anger issues that may be driving them to drink.

Those dealing with anger issues often have emotional difficulties that they are having a hard time resolving. They may suppress many of their feelings, believing them to be inappropriate. As these feelings build up they may eventually be expressed as uncontrollable anger in an outburst of rage.

Anyone struggling with anger issues should get treatment from an anger management center that can provide them with strategies and skills to cope with their anger. An alcohol problem that is connected to anger issues also needs to be addressed in order to achieve improved mental wellness. Therapy, anger management and AA meetings can all be useful in healing from anger problems.

Alcohol Induced Cirrhosis

Posted on: January 28th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Induced Cirrhosis

Alcohol abuse is something that not only takes its toll on someone’s personal life but it can also cause very serious damage to the body. Alcohol is a dangerous toxin that, when consumed in large amounts over a period of many years, can lead to physical health problems. The liver is one of the areas of the body that is most damaged by alcohol and many alcoholics even develop cirrhosis.

Cirrhosis is a liver disease that is most often linked with alcohol abuse and the effect that drinking has on the liver. The liver’s job in the body is to filter out toxins, break down proteins, and create bile to help absorb body fat. Heavy alcohol consumption taxes the liver and starts to replace healthy tissue with scar tissue resulting in cirrhosis.

Over time and with continued alcohol abuse, cirrhosis can cause the liver to stop functioning properly due to the increasing scar tissue. Cirrhosis typically develops when the person is between the ages of 30 and 40 as they start exhibiting symptoms such as jaundice or yellowing of the skin, hypertension resulting in increased blood pressure, and skin itching. An alcoholic will start to develop cirrhosis after drinking heavily for about eight years or so.

Cirrhosis can lead to complications such as a buildup of fluid in the stomach, encephalopathy or mental confusion, internal bleeding and other problems. Although cirrhosis cannot be completely reversed, the progress of the disease can be slowed so that some of the more severe symptoms don’t appear. The first step in treating cirrhosis is for the individual to stop drinking alcohol and detoxify their body from their dependency.

Some types of medication and better nutrition can improve some of the symptoms of cirrhosis but the most important thing is to stay sober permanently for better health.

Are All Alcoholics Impulsive?

Posted on: December 30th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcoholics Impulsive

Everyone who develops alcoholism has their own circumstances, personal history and other factors that caused their substance abuse problem. However, there are certain traits that many people with addictions tend to share such as the tendency to act impulsively. For alcoholics, impulsivity is one of the classic characteristics of people susceptible to dependency.

It is important for alcoholics to be aware of their impulsive nature, especially when they are in recovery and need to be vigilant about preventing a relapse. Alcoholism and impulsive behaviors have almost always been linked and many studies have found that the risk for both issues are connected. People that are impulsive are often seeking novelty or new sensations which can also lead to alcohol abuse.

In a sense, alcoholism itself is a type of impulse control issue that can never fully be resolved except by removing the substance from the person’s life. People with impulse control issues tend to act self-destructively and engage in harmful behavior that impairs their functioning. Alcoholics behave the same way but much of their impulsive and harmful actions center around alcohol.

Studies have revealed that alcoholics have an imbalance of certain neurotransmitters in the brain which can cause impulsive behavior. Alcohol use can actually increase the effects of the neurotransmitters that cause impulsivity. Many alcoholics already have impulsive behavior due to their brain structure and drinking only increases those tendencies.

This is one of the reasons why alcoholics can only recover if they remain completely abstinent from any alcohol use. Their impulsive nature may always be present to a certain extent but they can learn to channel it and avoid using alcohol as an outlet for their compulsions. Sobriety can also help decrease impulsivity and make it easier for alcoholics to moderate their behavior as much as possible.

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

Posted on: December 19th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Seeing a Family Member Homeless

When someone in the family has an addiction, loved ones often feel helpless and don’t know what to do to change their behavior. Sometimes the addict reaches their lowest point and may end up on the street, homeless because their addiction has become out of control. If this happens, it is crucial for the family to step in and help them recover before their situation gets worse.

Homeless people very frequently suffer from drug or alcohol addiction and the prognosis for living on the street for an addict is not good. They could get into dangerous situations and their health and wellbeing will suffer greatly. Loved ones might feel panicked and afraid when they find out that a family member is homeless and their initial reaction may be to take them into their home.

However, the first thing to think about when helping a family member from homelessness is how to address their addiction. Once you make sure they are safe, it is then time to start researching shelters and recovery programs that are designed to help homeless people with addictions. Getting them into some kind of treatment should be your first priority once you get them off of the street.

Once you do some research into the best treatment plan for them, make sure to drop them off and accompany them when they enter the facility. Since they most likely have hit rock bottom as a result of their homelessness, they may already understand how important it is for them to quit their substance abuse. It can also be helpful to check in on their progress, attend family therapy sessions and be supportive throughout their recovery program.

When an addict becomes homeless, they are at their most desperate point and need your help. Most importantly they also need professional treatment to get back on their feet.

Alcohol Increases Effects of Cigarettes

Posted on: December 13th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Increases Cigarettes Effects

People that drink alcohol regularly often also smoke cigarettes when they are out drinking. It is also very common for alcoholics to also struggle with cigarette addiction simultaneously. Why are the two problems so closely connected?

One of the reasons that people smoke when they drink, whether they are aware of it or not, is that nicotine helps offset that sedative effects of alcohol. The body may be seeking something to counteract the slow reaction times and other issues that go along with consuming alcohol. Another possible cause is that alcohol actually increases the rewarding effects of nicotine when the two substances are consumed together.

Studies have shown that when compared to a placebo drink, alcohol tended to enhance the pleasure and calming effect of cigarettes with nicotine. Even a fairly low dose of alcohol can elicit these effects, according to the study, which explains why people who drink have a very hard time quitting smoking. The interaction of the two drugs makes it very common for people in alcohol recovery to continue being addicted to cigarettes for some time.

Because cigarettes combat some of the effects of alcohol and alcohol in turn increases the effects of nicotine, people make a strong association with both drug habits. Alcoholics in recovery who still smoke may feel a stronger craving for alcohol when they have a cigarette. Someone who has quit smoking may relapse and smoke a cigarettes if they have had a few drinks.

For optimal health and to avoid the drug habits influencing one another, it can be beneficial to quit both smoking and alcohol at the same time. Both alcohol and cigarettes are toxins that cause cravings for one another and affect recovery. Quitting both can be challenging but it will create a faster path to sobriety and increased wellness.