Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Treatment’ Category

What is Opiophobia?

Posted on: October 3rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

What is Opiophobia?

With the opioid addiction crisis growing in the U.S. there are other issues surrounding painkillers that are becoming problematic. Because opioids have led to such high rates of overdose, a new trend of opiophobia has led to some people avoiding medication even to cope with chronic pain. Fear of the consequences of taking opioids is causing both doctors and patients to avoid prescription painkillers even when there are legitimate medical reasons for using them.

Although opioids can be addictive in many cases, some patients who are experiencing chronic pain can still benefit from controlled use of the medication. Misinformation about the medical value of opioids has been leading many people to avoid them at all costs and they are suffering from serious pain problems as a result. Even though opioid addiction is something to seriously consider before taking medication, there are some instances where it can be life saving.

Health care providers who are too hesitant to provide patients with opioid prescriptions may be allowing them to struggle with pain unnecessarily. Excessive regulation and insufficient medical use of opioids can be devastating problems for people who suffer from chronic pain. Unfortunately some of the efforts to combat addiction have led to reduced access to opioids for the people that truly need them.

It is important for people in the medical industry and patients alike to be educated about the dangers of opioids but also the instances in which they are useful and necessary. Even though it is a top priority to curb the high rates of abuse and overdose, avoiding opioids at all costs can also be problematic in other ways. Finding a balance between regulating powerful medications and having them available for those in need is a complicated issue that needs to be addressed in order to help minimize the damage surrounding the opioid crisis.

My Loved One Avoids Me if I Bring Up Treatment

Posted on: September 24th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

My Loved One Avoids Me if I Bring Up Treatment

When you know someone needs help for an addiction but you find it hard to discuss it with them it can become a problem. Sometimes addicts are still deep in denial even when everyone around them can see that they are going down a dangerous path. If your loved one avoids you when you discuss their addiction with them, it could be that they refuse to recognize that they have a problem.

The important thing to understand about a person’s addiction is that it is an illness that can control how they think and behave. Their decision to avoid you has nothing to do with you but is a reflection of how their substance abuse has taken over their mind. Although it may be difficult to witness they are now wired to do everything they can to keep using drugs.

A good strategy to take is to avoid enabling this person and set limits on your relationship with them. If they ask for money, comfort or a place to stay following a binge then you should keep boundaries with them so you aren’t helping them continue their behavior. Telling someone they need treatment and then doing something to enable them is a way of sending mixed signals.

If you have tried speaking to someone one on one about their addiction they are not responsive then might be time to stage an intervention. Try to gather as many friends, family and loved ones who are concerned about the addict and organize a time and place when you can discuss the problem with them. An intervention is often the most effective way to reach someone with an addiction because they see that everyone is in agreement that they have a problem and are more likely to choose to get help.

What is Comorbidity?

Posted on: September 11th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

What is Comorbidity?

Although having even one mental illness can be devastating, the reality is that many people struggle with more than one disorder at a time. Having two or more disorders simultaneously is known as comorbidity and it is actually very common in the field of mental health. Disorders such as social anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and substance abuse are all issues that tend to show comorbidity.

Certain problems tend to overlap with one another because they are connected in certain ways and influence each other. For example someone with social anxiety disorder may also have problems with depression because they tend to be more isolated and struggle with social interactions. Their social anxiety may cause them to become more depressed and vice versa.

Often, people with anxiety and other mental health problems may end up abusing substances as a way to cope with their symptoms leading to a dual disorder. Drinking or using drugs can temporarily alleviate symptoms but the two problems over time can worsen each other and become a complex situation that is difficult to treat. Substance abuse and mental health are closely connected in ways that must be addressed through specialized treatment.

Although comorbidity of any kind can be a challenging issue, if both disorders are treated simultaneously it is possible for patients to recover. Failing to treat one of the disorders will only lead to worsening symptoms and more complications. It is important for people with comorbid disorders to get an accurate diagnosis and treatment that is designed for multiple disorders.

Many people dealing with mental health issues may not realize that they have more than one disorder which is making it difficult for them to recover. A high quality treatment center can recognize comorbidity and provide immediate help to alleviate the symptoms of both problems over time.

Dealing with the Side Effects of Addiction Medication

Posted on: July 23rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Dealing with the Side Effects of Addiction Medication

People with very severe addictions often benefit from having substitute medications which can help them to immediately get off a harmful drug. Medications like methadone and suboxone can be useful tools to allow someone with a very serious dependency on opioids to start working on recovery without many of the intense withdrawal symptoms initially. Although these medications can save lives, they have a few side effects that patients will need to adjust to until they eventually wean themselves off of any substances.

Each person will react differently to a certain medication and if a particular option has too many side effects they can try something else instead. Methadone can have short term side effects when someone first begins using it such as drowsiness, light-headedness, or gastrointestinal problems. While the side effects may be unpleasant they can be dealt with through other types of over the counter or prescription medications.

In some cases methadone can also cause psychological side effects such as hallucinations, insomnia, anxiety or paranoia. If these side effects become severe the patient may need to try a different medication that may have less of an effect on them. Suboxone is an alternative to methadone but it can have its own side effects as well.

Suboxone can have short term side effects such as nausea, dizziness, sweating, insomnia and irregular heartbeat. One of the most serious side effects that can sometimes occur with suboxone is respiratory depression which leads to shallow breathing and a lack of oxygen in the body. If this occurs the patient should seek medical help immediately and cease their use of the medication.

Addiction medication can be a useful way to help patients transition off of a chemical dependency. When side effects occur their doctor can recommend supplementary medications or switch them to an alternative that may have a more mild effect.

What to Expect at Al Anon Meeting

Posted on: July 20th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

What to Expect at Al Anon Meeting

You may be familiar with Alcoholics Anonymous meetings because you have been to one, someone close to you attends meetings or you’ve seen it on television. Most people have an idea what an AA meeting is like, however not many people know about Al-Anon or Al-Ateen. Al‑Anon is a  support program for people whose lives have been affected by someone else’s alcohol abuse. Alcoholism is known a “family disease” in which several members of a family can be affected by one persons habits.

Like  AA groups, these meetings are a safe and welcoming place where you can connect and share your experiences with others that are going through a similar thing with their loved one. Parents, spouses, siblings and close friends of alcoholics attend Al-Anon to open up about how alcoholism has affected their lives.  Members can share their frustrations, negative past experiences and even share some healthy coping mechanisms, strengths and positive experiences that can give other members a sense of hope.

Like AA, the first time you go to a meeting you can share and talk to the group but you are not required to.Members of the meeting will then share their thoughts, things they are experiencing or talk about their progress in recovery. Everything that is said and shared in the meetings is anonymous and each member of the group is expected to maintain confidentiality. Most people find that sharing with the group can be cathartic and helpful even if their loved one has chosen to not get help.

Attendees can form friendships and more importantly a sense of support, knowing that they are not the only ones dealing with something so difficult like alcohol abuse. Many feel reluctant to attend a first meetings, but this Al-Anon is solely intended to offer help you and your family may have been needing for years.