Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Treatment’ Category

The Fundamentals Of Treatment For Drug Abuse

Posted on: August 8th, 2019 by emarketed No Comments

While there are various different paths towards recovery, there are certain fundamentals common among all of them. These are treatment modules that every recovery center will provide in each and every one of its programs.

If you or a loved one are going to receive treatment for drug abuse, you can expect the following.

Detox

When you are physically dependent on a substance, stopping cold turkey will lead to severe withdrawals. These withdrawals make it incredibly difficult to stick to the recovery process. In many cases, they can be dangerous and even fatal. For this reason, most drug rehab must begin with detox.

Drug detox refers to the controlled process in which an individual is withdrawn from the substance on which they’ve become dependent. At Gooden Center, detox is prescribed and monitored by medical professionals. The nature of your detox will depend on the substance. Some substances can be stopped cold turkey, while others require a tapering process using safe alternatives to the drug.

Physical dependence on a substance precludes the possibility of effective drug rehab. As long as your body is withdrawing from the substance, it will be difficult to stay clean and focus on the treatment process.

Dual Diagnosis

From the very beginning of the process, psychiatrists at Gooden Center will evaluate whether you may require a dual diagnosis. In many cases, substance abuse is caused by or leads to another mental illness. For example, people suffering with OCD may use drugs to try and quiet their obsessive thoughts. Alternatively, someone who has become accustomed to using drugs when they feel down will ultimately struggle to effectively cope with difficult emotions and this may trigger depression or anxiety.

Treatment of drug abuse will not be effective if co-occurring mental illnesses are not also treated. Aspects of the treatments will overlap, but specific mental illnesses need particular treatments. Furthermore, with the help of a dual diagnosis, therapists and doctors will better know how to approach an individual’s treatment.

Group Sessions

Addiction treatment differs from treatment of other mental illnesses in that group sessions are given far more prominence. Community is understood to be very important in treatment of drug abuse for a number of reasons. Addiction tends to lead to unintentional selfishness. When looking for one’s next fix, it is difficult to take others into account. Groups help substance users become more socially aware once again.

Group sessions also give individuals an opportunity to share their own stories and what they’re struggling with. Since everyone in the group has gone through similar hardships, while doing things they regret, this is a safe space in which no one has room to judge.

In addition, addicts can use group sessions to learn how others have managed to cope without substances. They can share their own techniques and ideas. They can learn to lean on others for support in trying times.

Individual Therapy

Group sessions are excellent for confronting one’s addiction on a general level. However, individual therapy is incredibly important to help you deal with your specific personal concerns. In individual therapy, you will discuss your background and history and identify your coping mechanisms. This will help you see which mechanisms have worked and which have become dysfunctional.

Individual therapy is also necessary when treating most mental illnesses. By working through your issues with a therapist, you are better able to notice your unhealthy patterns. With therapies such as CBT, you learn practical skills to challenge thoughts that tend to lead you in a negative direction.

Psychiatric Medication

Substance users who have a co-occurring disorder will likely be prescribed psychiatric medication to relieve its symptoms. These are generally non-addictive medications that affect the chemicals in your brain, addressing imbalances and providing increased stability. Anti-anxiety and sleeping medications such as Xanax and Stilnox, which have the potential for abuse, will not be prescribed.

Alternative Therapies

You will also have the opportunity to work with alternative therapies, including mindfulness-based techniques. Mindfulness in particular is important when treating addiction, as the approach of taking each moment on its own has helped millions get through the most trying times.

These techniques also give you more options when one or another coping skill is not appropriate to the situation.

Holistic Health

Treatment for drug abuse should take the person as a whole into account. Addiction has both physical and mental aspects, and the healthier a person is in general, the more likely they are to stay clean. Thus, your nutrition and fitness are very important. Similarly, keeping your mind active and developing hobbies or passions helps you sustain a more rounded, fulfilling life free from substances.

Maintenance

No one’s treatment is ever complete at the end of a program. On the contrary, without continued treatment and maintenance, relapse becomes more and more likely. Treatment for drug abuse goes on after leaving rehab, and beyond aftercare and sober living. Attending groups and being part of a recovery community are ideal safeguards to keep you on track in a fulfilling life free of drugs.

References:

1. Ziedonis, D. and Brady, K. (1997). DUAL DIAGNOSIS IN PRIMARY CARE. Medical Clinics of North America, 81(4), pp.1017-1036.

2. Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2017). Group Therapy for Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of Clinician Practices. Journal of groups in addiction & recovery, 12(4), 243–259. doi:10.1080/1556035X.2017.1348280

3. Blobaum P. M. (2013). Mapping the literature of addictions treatment. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 101(2), 101–109. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.101.2.005

4. Lichtigfeld, F. J., & Gillman, M. A. (1998). Antidepressants are not drugs of abuse or dependence. Postgraduate medical journal, 74(875), 529–532. doi:10.1136/pgmj.74.875.529

5. Fluyau, D., Revadigar, N., & Manobianco, B. E. (2018). Challenges of the pharmacological management of benzodiazepine withdrawal, dependence, and discontinuation. Therapeutic advances in psychopharmacology, 8(5), 147–168. doi:10.1177/2045125317753340

6. Young, M. E., DeLorenzi, L. d. and Cunningham, L. (2011), Using Meditation in Addiction Counseling. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, 32: 58-71. doi:10.1002/j.2161-1874.2011.tb00207.x

The Rural vs Urban Opioid Crisis

Posted on: March 2nd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
The Rural vs Urban Opioid Crisis

As the opioid epidemic continues to grow, researchers are beginning to recognize trends in how abuse and overdose affect different areas throughout the country. Opioid addiction is more dramatically affecting people living in rural areas rather than those in urban cities especially when it comes to prescription opioids. Older adults in rural areas are more frequently dealing with addiction and fatal overdoses than those in other parts of the country.

One of the reasons opioids have hit rural areas so hard is that people living these areas have nearly two times the odds of being prescribed opioids than those in urban cities. Studies have revealed that even though opioid prescriptions have been declining overall they still remain relatively high in rural areas. People in rural counties actually have an 87 percent higher chance of receiving an opioid prescription compared with people in metropolitan areas.

Prescription habits among primary care doctors may be at least partially to blame for the differences in prescription addiction in rural areas. Rural adults tend to be the ones that experience the highest rates of opioid issues and more are being hospitalized on a regular basis for their problems with prescription painkillers. Physicians in rural counties are often providing these kinds of drugs for people with pain problems because they feel they may not have the time or resources to get physical therapy or surgery.

There are also many barriers for people in rural areas to receive the treatment they need for addiction because they may have to travel long distances or experience long wait times to getting help. It may be more difficult for them to get the support they need to recover. It is important to establish more access to care for people in rural areas and to prevent rural doctors from overprescribing opioids in order to effectively reduce the opioid crisis.

Money Doesn’t Equal Happiness or Depression?

Posted on: January 29th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Money Doesn’t Equal Happiness or Depression?

A traditional saying tells us as that money can’t buy happiness and most people agree that having everything doesn’t make you happy. But in many cases, a person’s income can determine how and when they are able to heal. People with depression or anxiety are not always able to afford treatment, especially some of the more costly options available to those with a higher income.

People with more money are not necessarily happier, but they do have more opportunities to pay for mental health recovery. When a person is simply struggling to survive and is worried about their financial situation, they may not have the luxury of working on their mental health. For people with severe depression and other mental health issues, money can be an obstacle that prevents them from getting the treatment that they need.

When someone has a higher income they will find it easier to pay for a highly qualified therapist without worrying about their insurance or being put on a waiting list. They can also afford more alternative kinds of treatment that insurance may not cover such as acupuncture, energy healing and other methods. They aren’t necessarily less likely to be depressed, but they do have a wider range of options to help them recover.

Recognizing financial obstacles in getting help is important in improving the overall state of mental health for people in the U.S. Providing more affordable options for treatment is crucial so that everyone can have equal access to recovery from mental illness. For many people, mental health is a luxury that they cannot afford to focus their energy or finances on.

Mental health should not be a privilege but unfortunately that is the case for many people. More mental health programs for low income individuals may be able to help improve the situation and make it possible for people to get the help they need.

 

Are You Considered High Risk for Opioid Abuse?

Posted on: January 12th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Risk of Opioid Abuse

As the opioid epidemic continues to wreak havoc on the health of the nation, experts are working to understand the factors that can lead to opioid addiction or misuse. Certain people may have an increased risk for opioid abuse and should be very cautious about using opioids for any medical reasons. Knowing your own risk level can help keep you informed and safe from the dangers of opioid addiction.

Certain genetic factors can influence whether someone is more likely to become addicted to opioids. If you have had issues with another type of addiction in the past or if a close family member has had addiction problems then you may be at higher risk. Addiction can be an inherited trait so people with a family history of drug abuse should avoid using opioids or other addictive drugs.

People with mental health issues are also more likely to be at risk for opioid abuse and addiction. Someone with a mental illness may be more likely to abuse drugs as a way to alleviate their symptoms. The tendency to self-medicate makes mental illness sufferers much more vulnerable to addiction.

Another complicated risk factor is the issue of chronic pain. People who suffer from chronic pain are more likely to become addicted to opioids because they may be prescribed the drug on a long term basis due to their condition. Alternative pain treatment methods may be preferable for people with chronic pain who are concerned about their vulnerability to becoming addicted to opioids.

There are many other risk factors that can make someone more likely to abuse opioids such as living in a rural area, being unemployed, or having financial problems. The important thing to keep in mind is that opioids are a highly addictive drug and even with the absence of these risk factors, it is still possible to develop a problem with abuse.

What is Opiophobia?

Posted on: October 3rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opiophobia

With the opioid addiction crisis growing in the U.S. there are other issues surrounding painkillers that are becoming problematic. Because opioids have led to such high rates of overdose, a new trend of opiophobia has led to some people avoiding medication even to cope with chronic pain. Fear of the consequences of taking opioids is causing both doctors and patients to avoid prescription painkillers even when there are legitimate medical reasons for using them.

Although opioids can be addictive in many cases, some patients who are experiencing chronic pain can still benefit from controlled use of the medication. Misinformation about the medical value of opioids has been leading many people to avoid them at all costs and they are suffering from serious pain problems as a result. Even though opioid addiction is something to seriously consider before taking medication, there are some instances where it can be life saving.

Health care providers who are too hesitant to provide patients with opioid prescriptions may be allowing them to struggle with pain unnecessarily. Excessive regulation and insufficient medical use of opioids can be devastating problems for people who suffer from chronic pain. Unfortunately some of the efforts to combat addiction have led to reduced access to opioids for the people that truly need them.

It is important for people in the medical industry and patients alike to be educated about the dangers of opioids but also the instances in which they are useful and necessary. Even though it is a top priority to curb the high rates of abuse and overdose, avoiding opioids at all costs can also be problematic in other ways. Finding a balance between regulating powerful medications and having them available for those in need is a complicated issue that needs to be addressed in order to help minimize the damage surrounding the opioid crisis.