Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Drug Rehab’ Category

Are You Considered High Risk for Opioid Abuse?

Posted on: January 12th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Risk of Opioid Abuse

As the opioid epidemic continues to wreak havoc on the health of the nation, experts are working to understand the factors that can lead to opioid addiction or misuse. Certain people may have an increased risk for opioid abuse and should be very cautious about using opioids for any medical reasons. Knowing your own risk level can help keep you informed and safe from the dangers of opioid addiction.

Certain genetic factors can influence whether someone is more likely to become addicted to opioids. If you have had issues with another type of addiction in the past or if a close family member has had addiction problems then you may be at higher risk. Addiction can be an inherited trait so people with a family history of drug abuse should avoid using opioids or other addictive drugs.

People with mental health issues are also more likely to be at risk for opioid abuse and addiction. Someone with a mental illness may be more likely to abuse drugs as a way to alleviate their symptoms. The tendency to self-medicate makes mental illness sufferers much more vulnerable to addiction.

Another complicated risk factor is the issue of chronic pain. People who suffer from chronic pain are more likely to become addicted to opioids because they may be prescribed the drug on a long term basis due to their condition. Alternative pain treatment methods may be preferable for people with chronic pain who are concerned about their vulnerability to becoming addicted to opioids.

There are many other risk factors that can make someone more likely to abuse opioids such as living in a rural area, being unemployed, or having financial problems. The important thing to keep in mind is that opioids are a highly addictive drug and even with the absence of these risk factors, it is still possible to develop a problem with abuse.

When Substance Abuse Lands You in Jail

Posted on: December 24th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Substance Abuse

People that struggle with addiction often live with a deep sense of denial about their problem until they reach a very low point. Often their rock bottom can be when they are arrested for a DUI or land in jail for drug related crimes. In some cases, going to jail can be a wake-up call for people with addictions that their substance abuse has become a problem.

A large majority of inmates in prison are addicted to substances like alcohol and heroin. Dealing with an addiction while in jail can be difficult and painful as many prisons are not equipped to provide the medical care necessary to quit. Being suddenly cut off from their substance abuse can be very stressful and even dangerous for people with serious addictions.

One of the best options for people who have been arrested or landed possible jail time is to attend a treatment center for their addiction. Drug courts are sometimes an option that allows offenders to enter rehab rather than having to serve a full sentence. This option can be life saving for people that simply need to get help and are not involved in violent or more serious crimes.

For some people that serve shorter sentences and don’t have access to drug court, their time served in prison can help be a jump start for getting sober. For others it can be a difficult experience that may cause them to relapse because of the lack of proper treatment. It is crucial for any scenario that the offender enter a treatment center whenever possible so that they can avoid any jail time again in the future.

When addiction becomes so serious that it leads to problems with the law, it is important to get professional help in any way possible and end the abuse.

What is Comorbidity?

Posted on: September 11th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Comorbidity

Although having even one mental illness can be devastating, the reality is that many people struggle with more than one disorder at a time. Having two or more disorders simultaneously is known as comorbidity and it is actually very common in the field of mental health. Disorders such as social anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and substance abuse are all issues that tend to show comorbidity.

Certain problems tend to overlap with one another because they are connected in certain ways and influence each other. For example someone with social anxiety disorder may also have problems with depression because they tend to be more isolated and struggle with social interactions. Their social anxiety may cause them to become more depressed and vice versa.

Often, people with anxiety and other mental health problems may end up abusing substances as a way to cope with their symptoms leading to a dual disorder. Drinking or using drugs can temporarily alleviate symptoms but the two problems over time can worsen each other and become a complex situation that is difficult to treat. Substance abuse and mental health are closely connected in ways that must be addressed through specialized treatment.

Although comorbidity of any kind can be a challenging issue, if both disorders are treated simultaneously it is possible for patients to recover. Failing to treat one of the disorders will only lead to worsening symptoms and more complications. It is important for people with comorbid disorders to get an accurate diagnosis and treatment that is designed for multiple disorders.

Many people dealing with mental health issues may not realize that they have more than one disorder which is making it difficult for them to recover. A high quality treatment center can recognize comorbidity and provide immediate help to alleviate the symptoms of both problems over time.

Experiencing a Public Relapse

Posted on: August 9th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Experiencing a Public Relapse

Anyone who goes through a relapse will feel a deep sense of shame and failure about letting go of their sobriety. A public relapse can be even more embarrassing and shameful but it is a reality for many people, especially celebrities or public figures that suddenly get off the wagon. When people know that you have relapsed they might see it as a sign of weakness inability to stay committed.

Worrying what other people think about your relapse can be a natural reaction but it is important to focus on your own health first. The feelings of self-recrimination and shame can be overwhelming but you should not let it stop you from taking steps to get back on track. It can be helpful to realize that recovery is not always a straight path but can take some detours until you get a better handle on it.

People are often taught to be perfectionists or that they shouldn’t make mistakes when they are working toward their goals. Setbacks and accidents are a normal part of life especially with something so difficult as recovery. When you are dealing with a public relapse, keep those things in mind or even address them publicly if necessary so that people understand the nature of your journey to sobriety.

Shame and guilt can be destructive emotions so it is crucial to be able to forgive yourself for making a mistake in order to move on. Negative feelings can rob you of your motivation and make it hard to start over again because of a loss of self-belief and confidence. Letting go of your negative emotions can make it easier to focus on the work you need to do to get sober again.

A public relapse can be embarrassing but the most important thing is that you don’t waste time and get back into treatment as soon as possible.

Dealing with the Side Effects of Addiction Medication

Posted on: July 23rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Side Effects of Addiction Medication

People with very severe addictions often benefit from having substitute medications which can help them to immediately get off a harmful drug. Medications like methadone and suboxone can be useful tools to allow someone with a very serious dependency on opioids to start working on recovery without many of the intense withdrawal symptoms initially. Although these medications can save lives, they have a few side effects that patients will need to adjust to until they eventually wean themselves off of any substances.

Each person will react differently to a certain medication and if a particular option has too many side effects they can try something else instead. Methadone can have short term side effects when someone first begins using it such as drowsiness, light-headedness, or gastrointestinal problems. While the side effects may be unpleasant they can be dealt with through other types of over the counter or prescription medications.

In some cases methadone can also cause psychological side effects such as hallucinations, insomnia, anxiety or paranoia. If these side effects become severe the patient may need to try a different medication that may have less of an effect on them. Suboxone is an alternative to methadone but it can have its own side effects as well.

Suboxone can have short term side effects such as nausea, dizziness, sweating, insomnia and irregular heartbeat. One of the most serious side effects that can sometimes occur with suboxone is respiratory depression which leads to shallow breathing and a lack of oxygen in the body. If this occurs the patient should seek medical help immediately and cease their use of the medication.

Addiction medication can be a useful way to help patients transition off of a chemical dependency. When side effects occur their doctor can recommend supplementary medications or switch them to an alternative that may have a more mild effect.