Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for the ‘Mental Health’ Category

Link Between Sleep Disturbances and the Onset of Mania

Posted on: October 16th, 2018 by emarketed No Comments

Link Between Sleep Disturbances and the Onset of Mania

People with mental illnesses like depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder often have trouble with getting regular sleep. Unfortunately this can sometimes create a vicious cycle as their sleep issues can worsen symptoms of their disorder. This is especially a problem for people with bipolar disorder who may find that their problems with sleeping can trigger a manic episode.

Studies of bipolar disorder have linked sleep disturbances with both problems functioning and the onset of mania in many individuals. The two issues influence each other as many people with bipolar disorder find that their symptoms make it difficult to sleep and their lack of sleep can worsen symptoms. Research has shown that about half of people with bipolar disorder wake up in the night or have difficulty falling asleep.

People that are not able to sleep a full eight hours a night often have a worse quality of life especially when they are dealing with a complicated disorder like bipolar disorder. Lack of sleep can lead to a manic episode which in turn which cause the individual to sleep even less. Mania can cause people with bipolar disorder to feel that they need less sleep to function.

It is important for people with bipolar disorder to try to improve their sleeping habits in order to minimize the onset of episodes and also to improve their overall quality of life. Some medications and lifestyle changes can help people with the disorder start to sleep more regularly. With treatment, some of their symptoms may be reduced which can also help promote better sleep.

Eating a healthy diet, exercising, going to therapy and avoiding alcohol and drugs can all lead to better sleep and as a result will minimize the possibility of triggering a manic episode.

Are You Lonely or Are You Depressed?

Posted on: October 9th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Are You Lonely or Are You Depressed?

Depression and feelings of loneliness are often closely related and some even believe that when someone is lonely it is simply another form of being depressed. There can be a lot of confusion between the two problems as people may find it difficult to identify what they are actually feeling. It can be hard to pinpoint feelings of loneliness and whether they are a symptom of depression or if you simply need more human connection.

Loneliness comes from a deep emotional drive that human beings have to feel that they belong. They want to feel socially connected and experience intimate relationships with others. If those needs are not met or they are rejected in some way it can lead to feelings of loneliness.

When someone feels lonely it is directly related to how they feel about their relationships while depression is more a general feeling of sadness or hopelessness that doesn’t always have a direct cause. Depression is not as connected to a specific motivational drive the way that loneliness is. Someone who is depressed may have feelings of worthlessness or loss of interest that are not related to specific problems like social isolation.

One thing to keep in mind is that although loneliness and depression are two separate issues, it is very common for people to feel both lonely and depressed. Someone who suffers from depression begin to withdraw from their social relationships and isolate themselves in a way that leads to loneliness. On the other hand, not everyone who is lonely is depressed and not everyone who is depressed is lonely; it simply depends on their personal circumstances.

If you are experiencing feelings of either loneliness or depression, talk to a counselor to work on solutions to improve your mental health and connections with others.

Personality Disorder and Medication

Posted on: September 20th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Personality Disorder and Medication

While there is plenty of information that people understand about mood disorders like depression and anxiety, personality disorders are more complex and not often discussed in regards to mental health. A personality disorder can cause serious disruptions to a person’s daily life and their ability to hold a job or maintain relationships. Treatment for a personality disorder may combine psychotherapy and a number of psychiatric medications to help minimize issues with mood and other difficult symptoms.

Medication does not have the ability to cure a personality disorder in itself, but when used alongside regular psychotherapy sessions it can help alleviate some of the mood changes that the patient experiences. People with personality disorders benefit from mood stabilizers, especially those with borderline personality disorder which is often accompanied by feelings of depression and anxiety. Antidepressants which help with low mood such as Zoloft, Prozac and Wellbutrin are all useful in getting patients to feel more stable.

Some more severe personality disorders may even benefit from the use of antipsychotic medications although they are typically not considered psychotic disorders. These types of medications can be helpful in reducing anxiety, paranoid thinking, anger and impulsivity. Antipsychotic medications can include options like Haldol, Zyprexa and Clozaril which can help improve certain symptoms.

Lastly, anti-anxiety medications are also commonly used in treating personality disorders as many people may have a co-occurring issue with anxiety. Many personality disorders involve some type of anxiety and medications like Klonopin, Xanax and Valium are all helpful in reducing anxious feelings.

Some patients may need medication long-term but in most cases these prescriptions are used to provide temporary relief during treatment. Ultimately, psychotherapy can allow patients to resolve and manage the issues related to their personality disorder so that they can minimize their use of medication.

What Does the Future of Bipolar Treatment Look Like?

Posted on: September 15th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

What Does the Future of Bipolar Treatment Look Like?

Bipolar disorder is one of the most difficult mental illnesses to diagnose and treat because of its complicated shifts between different symptoms. At the present time there is no cure for bipolar disorder but strategies such as medication and cognitive behavioral therapy to help minimize symptoms and manage the illness. However some researchers are looking for different methods that could use a more holistic approach to treating the disorder in the future.

Mental illness often are closely related to issues in the brain that lead to certain mood problems and various behaviors. Medications are meant to help balance out chemicals in the brain that may be causing certain symptoms. However, researchers believe that helping to restore nerve cell health in the brain for better communication may go a long way to treat issues like bipolar disorder.

In the past it was believed that bipolar disorder was caused by an imbalance of chemicals like serotonin or dopamine which led to depressed or elevated moods. Researchers now believe that neural plasticity may play a more important role in alleviated the symptoms of mania and depression. People with bipolar disorder tend to have atrophy of neurons in certain brain areas but improving nerve cells in these areas could potentially change the path of the disorder.

Medications like lithium which are used in treating bipolar disorder were recently discovered to actually boost levels of proteins that help neurons maintain their function. This may explain why lithium has been shown to be effective as a long term treatment. Using other methods to improve the health of neurons in the brain may create a more focused and efficient way to reduce symptoms quickly.

Although more research needs to be done to determine long term results, nerve and brain health may be the focus of bipolar treatment in the future.

Panic and Anxiety Hotlines

Posted on: September 6th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Panic and Anxiety Hotlines

People who experience anxiety often don’t know where to turn when they are having a particularly bad episode. They may feel too embarrassed or afraid to call friends or family to talk about what they are going through. Anxiety hotlines provide people with an opportunity to discuss personal problems with a compassionate person who is ready to help.

Hot lines are anonymous and confidential which can make it easier for people who are worried about being judged for their anxiety issues. They provide valuable resources for those who have panic attacks or are going through a crisis and simply need someone to talk to who will be understanding about their situation. Having someone simply listen and give you support can be an enormous comfort when you are in the midst of a serious episode.

There are a few different types of anxiety problems including panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety. Hot lines can offer advice and help for any of these issues no matter what your current level of anxiety may be. You can discuss your feelings of fear, shame, worry, pain or panic with a person who can help you feel more calm and relaxed.

One of the most important roles for hotlines is to allow people to feel that they are not alone in what they are dealing with. People with anxiety often feel isolated and unable to talk about their feelings for fear that others won’t understand. A hotline gives them a chance to open up and feel more connected to someone who truly cares.

Anxiety hotlines are convenient and helpful for anyone in crisis but if you have a long term anxiety disorder it might be beneficial to find a regular therapist. However, hotlines are a crucial support system that can be life-saving for people who are at their lowest point.