Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

map Pasadena Drug Rehab Center for Men

Archive for the ‘Mental Health’ Category

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

Posted on: September 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

People suffering from anxiety are 2 to 3 times more likely to struggle with addiction. Since 18% of the American population is suffering from anxiety, it’s not surprising that many individuals in drug rehab have a co-occurring anxiety disorder. For this reason, drug rehab centers treat anxiety (and other mental illnesses) concurrently with the substance use disorder.

Here is what you need to know about the link between anxiety and substance use, and how it is treated in rehab centers.

The Link Between Anxiety and Substance Use

There are a number of reasons people suffering from anxiety start using substances. For people suffering from social anxiety disorder, alcohol and other substances give them confidence and lower their inhibitions. They may start using the substance in group settings or when they are afraid they won’t be able to speak to someone important.

In contrast, many people suffering from various forms of anxiety use drugs and alcohol to turn off their mind’s chatter. This is especially true for people suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who struggle to find ways to quiet obsessive thoughts. However, it is often also the case for people with other forms of anxiety.

Since anxiety can lead to insomnia, as the individual struggles to shut down their mind despite being exhausted, some sufferers turn to drugs or alcohol to help get to sleep.

There are many avenues which lead people suffering from anxiety to substance abuse. How is anxiety treated in drug rehab centers?

Dual-Diagnosis

All good rehab centers take a dual-diagnosis approach to recovery. This means that they treat any co-occurring mental illnesses concurrently with the substance use disorder. As with anxiety, many other mental illnesses correlate with substance abuse, and in order to fully recover, patients need to treat both.

Therefore, anxiety treatment in a drug rehab center is given high priority. On some occasions, addiction treatment coincides with proven anxiety treatments.

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

Many common treatments for substance use disorder intersect with treatments for anxiety. Group therapy is a fundamental part of drug rehab. It gives residents the opportunity to voice their issues, rather than obsessing over them internally. The sense of community helps individuals know they are not alone, and the support reassures them.

Mindfulness training is also useful for both addiction and anxiety. Mindfulness techniques help individuals quiet their minds, letting the troubling thoughts come and go rather than holding onto them or trying in vain to get rid of them.

Individual Therapy

While every patient in a rehab center will receive individual therapy, it provides those suffering with anxiety to confront the problem head-on. In individual therapy, patients can focus on their own personal issues and not just their substance use. They work with the therapist to understand where their anxiety originated and identify the narratives that drive the anxiety. With this understanding, they can begin changing those narratives in a significant, paradigmatic way.

In addition, individual therapy gives the person the chance to learn specific techniques to deal with anxiety. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is perhaps the most popular therapy used for treating anxiety in particular. In CBT, the individual learns to identify and challenge troubling thoughts. Often these thoughts are irrational, and challenging them brings this to light, helping the person let go of them. Even if the thoughts are rational, obsessing over them is often irrational and, with practice, the individual learns to let them go.

CBT provides a range of other techniques to manage anxiety. For example, some therapists recommend setting aside “worry time” to spend considering the anxious thoughts, while compartmentalizing them.

Medication

In many cases, psychiatrists will prescribe medication to help individuals manage their anxiety. Rehab centers have psychiatrists who specialize in dealing with addiction. This is important, considering many anti-anxiety medications are addictive. The benzodiazepine class in particular – including Xanax, Valium, Ativan, and other well-known tranquilizers – are known to build dependence.

Instead of prescribing these drugs, which are at best temporary solutions, psychiatrists in rehab centers will prescribe long-term alternatives. Seroquel can help with anxiety and depression, as well as facilitating better sleep. Antidepressants are proven to reduce anxiety. Your psychiatrist will have a wide range of knowledge about the best non-addictive chemical options to treat anxiety.

Occupational Therapy

The rehab center, or your individual counselor, may also provide occupational therapy. This is training that helps you in practical ways, such as creating structure, managing anxiety through day-to-day activities, practicing for job interviews, and much more.

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

Rehab centers place a high importance on treating anxiety and other mental illnesses, as they can lead to rehab. If an individual’s drug use began as a way to deal with anxiety, they need to find adaptive ways of dealing with that anxiety, or drug use will be the most attractive option.

Anxiety disorders and substance use disorders are closely linked. Good drug rehab centers treat anxiety concurrently with addiction.

References:

  1.  Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (2016). Substance Use Disorders
  2. Franken, I. H. and Hendriks, V. M. (2001), Screening and Diagnosis of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Substance Abuse Patients. The American Journal on Addictions, 10: 30-39. doi:10.1080/105504901750160448

  3. Mancebo, M. C., Grant, J. E., Pinto, A., Eisen, J. L., & Rasmussen, S. A. (2009). Substance use disorders in an obsessive compulsive disorder clinical sample. Journal of anxiety disorders, 23(4), 429–435. doi:10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.08.008

  4. Blobaum P. M. (2013). Mapping the literature of addictions treatment. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 101(2), 101–109. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.101.2.005

  5. Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2017). Group Therapy for Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of Clinician Practices. Journal of groups in addiction & recovery, 12(4), 243–259. doi:10.1080/1556035X.2017.1348280

  6. Otte C. (2011). Cognitive behavioral therapy in anxiety disorders: current state of the evidence. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience, 13(4), 413–421

  7. Vasile, R. G., Bruce, S. E., Goisman, R. M., Pagano, M. and Keller, M. B. (2005), Results of a naturalistic longitudinal study of benzodiazepine and SSRI use in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. Depress. Anxiety, 22: 59-67. doi:10.1002/da.20089

4 Common Myths about Depression

Posted on: August 23rd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

 

Even though depression may be one of the most common mental health problems in the U.S. it is a topic that is rarely discussed. People have many misconceptions about depression because of the stigma behind the disease and a lack of understanding about what causes it. These are some of the prevailing myths about depression.

 

  1. Depression is all in your head

People mistakenly believe that depression is something that a person can just snap out of or shut off. While depression can partially be related to negative thoughts, it is a chronic disorder that requires treatment to manage. It is not only a psychological disorder but it also has social and biological elements as well with physical issues that need to be addressed.

 

  1. Depression is a normal part of life that will pass on it’s own

Unfortunately, many people with depression themselves believe this myth which can stop them from getting the help they need. It can be normal to feel sad from time to time but depression is a more serious issue that is too difficult to resolve alone. You don’t have to live with depression and wait for it to end, you can get help to recover.

 

  1. Depression always requires medication

Although many people have benefitted from the use of medication to treat their depression, it is only one option for treatment. Some may prefer not to use any substances to handle their symptoms and would prefer to focus on other methods including cognitive behavioral therapy. Taking medication depends on the severity of the condition as well as the individual’s personal choices.

 

  1. Depression is a weakness

Many people deal with the stigma that having depression means that you are weak and can’t handle life. The reality is that depression is a psychological condition that is not a choice and has nothing to do with how strong someone is. Getting treatment take strength and courage for people dealing with difficult feelings.

 

References

https://www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/mental-health-myths-facts

The Differences Between Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder

Posted on: August 21st, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

 

Mental illnesses can be complex and difficult to diagnose, especially when they share similar symptoms to other illnesses. Borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder are often confused because they have some similar clinical features. The two illnesses also frequently co-occur which can make it even more challenging to get an accurate diagnosis.

 

Borderline personality disorder or BPD is characterized by impulsivity, unstable relationships, cognitive problems and affective disturbance. People with bipolar disorder can also be impulsive and show psychotic symptoms as well as mood disturbances. The two problems are related and often misdiagnosed as psychiatrists may mistake one for the other.

 

One of the major differences between BPD and bipolar disorder is the length of time in which mood changes occur. Mood swings can be short lived for people with BPD, often lasting only a few hours at a time and they are normally in reaction to an environmental stressor. Someone with bipolar disorder on the other hand will experience mood disturbances that last weeks or even months and the moods will occur out of the blue.

 

People with BPD also tend to have more feelings of worthlessness and fears of abandonment that may be less common in bipolar disorder. People who are bipolar can often have an inflated sense of self-esteem due to their manic episodes which make them elated and grandiose. People with BPD also see their problems with relationships as the source of their suffering while those with bipolar disorder will see them as a consequence of their behavior.

 

Both disorders can lead the individual to consider and often attempt suicide or self-harm. It is important for a person to take time to get an accurate diagnosis so that they can get proper treatment for either their borderline personality disorder symptoms or their bipolar disorder.

 

References

https://www.womenshealth.gov/mental-health/mental-health-conditions/borderline-personality-disorder

Tips for Boosting Mental Health

Posted on: June 14th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

 

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

Self care means taking the time to pay attention not only to your physical well being but also your mental health. There are many small ways that you can quickly boost your mental health if you are feeling down and need to recharge. Developing a routine of focusing on your mental well-being will build up over time and improve your state of mind on a regular basis.

One of the quickest and most effective ways to ease stress is to write down your thoughts. Keeping a journal every day and writing down your personal feelings can be a great way to vent and express things that you might not feel comfortable talking about. Journaling allows you a personal space to cope with the thoughts that may be bringing you down.

Another useful tactic is learning how to counter negative thoughts with positive ones or develop skills in creating a positive spin. Everyone has negative thoughts from time to time or starts to interpret events in a negative light. Bringing in some positive points to counter those thoughts can help prevent you from spiraling and helps you gain some new perspective on a situation.

One of the ways that people can start to produce more positive feelings and thoughts is through a practice of gratitude. Taking time to think about or write down the things that you are grateful for can have a major impact on your mood. We often forget all the good things that we have when we get bogged down in negativity and forget to be grateful.

It is also important to have some “go to” self-care practices that you know will boost your mood. It could be anything from taking a walk, watching your favorite movie, calling a friend or anything you know will help you feel better. Regular self-care can keep your mental health in a better state so that you can stay positive.

Recognizing Different Types of Depression

Posted on: June 12th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

 

Recognizing Different Types of Depression

Depression is one of the most common mental illnesses in the U.S. and people tend to think of it as one general problem. However, depression can come in many forms and it affects people in different ways depending on their individual experiences and their specific diagnosis. Symptoms of depression can vary greatly and people who have gone through certain types of trauma may have their own form of depression.

The most general type of depression that people are familiar with is major depression which is diagnosed when someone has had depression symptoms for more than six months. People with this form of depression are not experiencing symptoms in relation to specific conditions but are struggling with long term feelings of sadness and hopelessness. Major depression may occur in just one episode or it can return several times during the person’s lifetime.

Another form of depression that is less severe is known as dysthymia which is a low intensity mood disorder. Symptoms may be similar to major depression but are less intense and will often last much longer. People with this disorder may not be completely disabled by their illness but they may still have problems functioning or feeling good.

Depression can also arise under specific circumstances such as in conditions like postpartum depression and seasonal affective disorder. Women with postpartum depression experience their symptoms for a period of time after giving birth. Seasonal affective disorder is a type of depression that occurs only in certain seasons, usually during winter.

Depression is also associated with other mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder which can include major bouts of depression as part of their different episodes. It is important for people with depression to get an accurate diagnosis so that they know which kind of depression they are dealing with and can get appropriate treatment.