Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

map Pasadena Drug Rehab Center for Men

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Are We in a New Phase of Opioid Crisis?

Posted on: February 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Are We in a New Phase of Opioid Crisis?

Even though the level of opioid abuse and overdose has already reached epidemic proportions, the problem is continuing to escalate into a new and more dramatic phase. Researchers are predicting that the problem will keep growing and shift into a different form as new kinds of opioids are being consumed more often. They also predict that some of the programs aimed restricting access to prescription painkillers may not be enough to stem the tide of abuse.

One of the biggest issues that is changing the path of the opioid epidemic is the introduction of new and powerful synthetic opioids like fentanyl. This synthetic drug is 50 times more potent than heroin and even a small amount can lead to an overdose if the user doesn’t have enough of a tolerance. Fentanyl has led to overdoses in areas throughout the country and even a mass overdose where 13 people at the same party needed to be revived.

The number of overdose deaths attributed to fentanyl has been steadily rising and causing health issues all over the U.S. Fentanyl is dangerous not only because it is so potent but also due to its low “therapeutic index” or the line between a safe dose and a fatal one. It can be very easy to overdose on fentanyl because even a microgram can be too much for a person’s body to handle.

Researchers predict that fentanyl will cause an increase in opioid abuse and overdose in the near future. It may be some time before the U.S. is able to reduce instances of opioid addiction and deaths related to opioid abuse. Our current programs may not be enough to prevent the growing number of deaths resulting from both prescription opioids and fentanyl.

New tactics may be necessary to try to change the current course of the opioid epidemic.

What is Opiophobia?

Posted on: October 3rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opiophobia

With the opioid addiction crisis growing in the U.S. there are other issues surrounding painkillers that are becoming problematic. Because opioids have led to such high rates of overdose, a new trend of opiophobia has led to some people avoiding medication even to cope with chronic pain. Fear of the consequences of taking opioids is causing both doctors and patients to avoid prescription painkillers even when there are legitimate medical reasons for using them.

Although opioids can be addictive in many cases, some patients who are experiencing chronic pain can still benefit from controlled use of the medication. Misinformation about the medical value of opioids has been leading many people to avoid them at all costs and they are suffering from serious pain problems as a result. Even though opioid addiction is something to seriously consider before taking medication, there are some instances where it can be life saving.

Health care providers who are too hesitant to provide patients with opioid prescriptions may be allowing them to struggle with pain unnecessarily. Excessive regulation and insufficient medical use of opioids can be devastating problems for people who suffer from chronic pain. Unfortunately some of the efforts to combat addiction have led to reduced access to opioids for the people that truly need them.

It is important for people in the medical industry and patients alike to be educated about the dangers of opioids but also the instances in which they are useful and necessary. Even though it is a top priority to curb the high rates of abuse and overdose, avoiding opioids at all costs can also be problematic in other ways. Finding a balance between regulating powerful medications and having them available for those in need is a complicated issue that needs to be addressed in order to help minimize the damage surrounding the opioid crisis.

Young People Recover from Schizophrenia

Posted on: August 23rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Young People Recover from Schizophrenia

Although schizophrenia is known as one of the most devastating diagnoses in the realm of mental health disorders, recent studies have revealed that it is not as hopeless as previously believed. In the past it was thought that only a small minority of people with schizophrenia could recover from their disorder. However recently it was discovered that about half of participants in a Norwegian study were able to either partially or fully recover from schizophrenia.

The study focused on young people who were given four years of treatment for their disorder. About 55 percent of them were able to recover and even 10 percent of those that were fully recovered no longer need medication. The results reveal much greater potential for recovery than previous research had shown which gives hope to patients with schizophrenia and their loved ones.

Researchers followed the progress of 30 young adults who were recently hospitalized or were starting outpatient treatment for schizophrenia. All of the patients had serious delusions and hallucinations that impacted their ability to function. Each patient received information about their diagnosis and what they could do to help manage the disorder during treatment.

The patients also participated in group discussions and received regular sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy to help them address their delusions and other symptoms. Most patients took antipsychotic medication to ease their symptoms during treatment and follow-up. They also received help finding a vocation through supported work and then regular employment which was part of the criteria for full recovery.

Those who held regular employment and reduced many of their symptoms often showed stronger signs of resilience. The results reveal the possibilities for patients with schizophrenia to recover if they receive treatment early and exhibit motivation and strength to keep working toward better health.

Fentanyl is Present In Majority of Opioid Deaths

Posted on: May 25th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opioid Deaths

The highly potent opioid known as fentanyl has been a cause for concern recently as more and more overdoses have occurred as a result of the drug. Many dealers have been lacing their illegal drugs with fentanyl without the user’s knowledge. As a result, many have unknowingly ingested a powerful sedative and ended up overdosing.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that has caused an alarming increase in death rates and addiction. The opioid is most commonly found laced in combination with cocaine, methamphetamines, and other illegal drugs sold on the street. Dealers may be adding traces of opioids in order to make their drugs more addictive to the people buying them.

New statistics have shown that fentanyl was involved in nearly half of all opioid-related deaths in the year 2016. Many of the deaths were due to opioid or heroin overdose but some of them involved other drugs as well. Fentanyl was a factor in many overdose deaths involving non-opioids such as cocaine, benzodiazepines and antidepressants.

It is important for the public to be educated about the dangers of fentanyl in order to prevent overdose deaths from continuing to increase. Fentanyl is a very powerful drug that is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine. A small amount of fentanyl laced with any drug can cause the user to overdose if they have no tolerance for opioids and are not aware it is in their drug.

Someone overdosing on fentanyl might have trouble breathing, have a slow or erratic pulse and lose consciousness. Certain medications can help to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose so it is important to get help immediately to prevent an overdose from becoming fatal. When people know more about fentanyl and its effects it can be possible to reduce overdoses and potentially save lives.

Demand for Anxiety Treatment in College

Posted on: April 25th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Demand for Anxiety Treatment

Mental illness is something that more and more young people are struggling with as they try to make it through their education. With overwhelming academic schedules and the pressure to succeed, college students are suffering from anxiety in record numbers. Students are experiencing high amounts of stress that they are unable to cope with which is leading to serious mental health issues.

College campuses are facing an unprecedented demand for counseling services and many are unable to keep up with the high volume of students in need. Between 2009 and 2015 the number of students visiting counseling centers increased by about 30 percent on average in spite of a decrease in enrollment rates. Many students going to counseling on college campuses have attempted suicide or engaged in self-harm.

Studies have shown that about 61 percent of students in a college survey felt a sense of overwhelming anxiety. This is partially due to busy workloads and students burning out on intense academic demands at their school. The pressure to succeed can lead to college kids struggling so much with anxiety and other mental health issues that they are forced to drop out of school.

Many college campuses are working to meet the high demand for mental health services by providing depression screenings and more counseling clinics to help students. Some universities are adding more mental health clinicians so that students are not left behind at the busy counseling offices. However, most counseling centers are still working with limited resources and counselors are struggling to keep up with the large volume of students seeking help.

In order to meet the growing demand for mental health care, college campuses need more funding so that they can help every student with anxiety or other issues. If colleges can allocate more resources to their counseling services they may be able to keep more students in school.