Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘alcohol abuse’

Substance Abuse Among Culinary Chefs

Posted on: June 12th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Substance Abuse Among Culinary Chefs

While cooking and creating dishes can be a fulfilling passion for most chefs, it can also be a stressful and high pressure industry. Many culinary chefs, especially students in training and chefs in high end restaurants, end up turning to substance abuse as a way to cope with the pressure that they experience in the kitchen. In an environment surrounded by plenty of alcohol as well as mental and emotional tension, it is not surprising that chefs end up self-medicating on the job.

The food industry has been known to have a party reputation as staff members often share shots and drinks after hours and even sometimes on the clock. Hospitality industry workers actually make up a significant portion of the people receiving addiction treatment in rehab programs. Staying sober or even drinking moderately can be especially challenging in a restaurant environment and chefs are often hit the hardest by addiction.

Chefs and other restaurant employees are working in a place where drinking on the job is normal and often encouraged. They may come into contact with so many people who have addiction issues that they often lose their sense of what typical behavior is. Other drugs are also an issue in the restaurant industry as chefs and staff members may use cocaine or other stimulants to help them get through a long shift.

Although the restaurant industry is associated with a certain lifestyle it is possible for chefs in recovery to find others who are in a similar situation. Having other restaurant employees around who don’t drink or use drugs can be beneficial for those who are trying to commit to being sober. It can be challenging for chefs to cope with stress and temptation in a restaurant environment but with enough support they can make healthier choices.

Brett Favre was Abusing Alcohol During the Prime of NFL Career

Posted on: June 5th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Brett Favre was Abusing Alcohol During the Prime of NFL Career

Legendary athlete Brett Favre has had an amazing career with the NFL but his success did not stop him from struggling with dark times and issues of addiction. The former Green Bay Packers quarterback spent 3 stints in rehab as he fought an addiction to both alcohol and painkillers. Throughout his time in the NFL, Favre recovered and relapsed several times while the public was mostly unaware.

Favre first entered rehab in 1996 when he was at the height of his fame and success with the Packers to address his problems with drinking and addiction to Vicodin. He has said that at one point he took 12 tablets of Vicodin at a time. At the time he wasn’t convinced that he had a problem but was talked into going to rehab by people in his life that were concerned about his drinking and asked him to attend.

The football star was resistant to treatment in his first rehab stay and found it too hard to admit that he had an issue with alcohol. Even after 28 days of treatment during his first stay he ended up in rehab again several years later after relapsing. His third and final stay in rehab finally helped him realize that he needed to change his ways as he found it difficult to make it through normal social situations without having several drinks.

His days of drinking and abusing painkillers are behind him after he began to understand how it was affecting his personal life. Now that Favre is sober he has since retired from football in the NFL which he played for nearly 20 years. He was a hard working athlete who played 321 straight games during his career which is a record for a quarterback.

Alcoholism and Masculinity

Posted on: May 10th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

 

Alcoholism and Masculinity

Alcoholism and Masculinity

Historically, alcohol abuse has always been more prevalent among males than females although recent statistics have been slightly shifting. Overall, men tend to become addicted to alcohol more often than women and they tend to binge drink in greater amounts. There is an intricate relationship between alcohol and masculinity as many men feel they must drink alcohol and large amounts of it to prove their manhood or affirm that they are masculine.

Social drinking has traditionally for many years been a cultural symbol of manliness which is often strengthened by media portrayals of alcohol and men. Some theories express that men with alcohol dependencies actually have the most fragile masculine identities that they are attempting to boost by heavy binge drinking.

Male Culture and Social Drinking

Studies show that men not only consume more alcohol but they also have higher frequencies of intoxication and are more likely to form a dependency than women. Certain male subculture and environments tend to encourage excessive drinking such as Greek fraternities which support the notion that alcohol is a rite of passage for men.

Men who are able to drink large amounts of alcohol without much of a physical reaction are considered more manly than those who become sick or cannot handle their booze. Alcohol abuse and a high tolerance then becomes a way to prove masculinity in many male social circles. Research has shown that men who adhere to many of these kinds of masculine norms are actually more vulnerable to peer pressure and are insecure about proving themselves.

Masculinity and the need to adhere to masculine norms can be harmful in a number of different ways. Men who try to conform to strict male codes often experience heightened psychological strain and burden that can exacerbate their alcohol abuse. Drinking alcohol then, serves as a method of both proving their masculinity and an emotional escape from the strain of adhering to these types of male norms. The male norms and codes then appear to be closely linked to alcohol abuse among many men who struggle with their own masculinity.

Men who value other qualities such as self reliance and control may be better equipped to minimize their drinking behavior. On the other hand, men who focus more on physical strength and ability to handle substances will be more likely to test their limits and consume more alcohol than others. In many cases, these are the men who develop dependencies and struggle the most with addiction.

Bradley Cooper Talks Alcoholism, Depression and Recovery

Posted on: May 7th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Bradley Cooper

Bradley Cooper is a famous and esteemed actor and producer.  He first achieved prominence with his work on the television shows Alias and Jack and Bobby. Since then, he has become highly esteemed for his roles in The Hangover trilogy, Silver Linings Playbook, and American Hustle.  He has received two Academy Award nominations, and was named the “Sexist Man Alive” by People magazine in 2011.

However, like many people who seem to outwardly enjoy a great deal of fame and success, his personal life has been marked by struggles.   He has abstained from alcohol since he was 29, out of fears that “If I continued [drinking], I was going to sabotage my whole life.”  In a January 2014 interview with GQ magazine, Bradley spoke about his life’s struggles with alcoholism and depression, and told a story of hope and recovery that can serve as a great encouragement to anyone seeking freedom from the pain of addiction.  

There was a Problem

Many so-called “high functioning” addicts can use their outward success as an excuse to sink further into denial, telling themselves their addiction isn’t really out of control or something they need help for, because they are continuing to be able to do their jobs.  Fortunately, Bradley Cooper possessed enough truthful self-awareness to not fall into that trap.  His GQ interviewer, Zach Baron asked about the impact of his alcoholism, expecting stories of not showing up on set or of “work getting [expletive] up.”  

His response was that things didn’t have to get to that point for him to realize there was a problem. “The best thing I can do is embrace who I am and then do that to the fullest extent, and then whatever happens, happens.”  His alcohol abuse was taking him away from that and putting him’” farther away from fulfilling any potential I would have.” Emma Stone, an actress he has worked with on several films, noticed this transformation herself, saying “He’s gotten more and more present in his life as he got older.”

Personal Transformation

Because alcohol was interfering with his passions and his work, he threw himself into the process of recovery, and grew in a life-saving level of self-awareness and commitment to his career.  His low point occurred after an Achilles injury and accompanying depression that left him homebound and considering quitting acting altogether.  When he saw that the effects of his addiction was leading him to have less and less screen time, that was enough to motivate him to seek change.

After he got his own life in order, his film and television career enjoyed more success then ever, and he discovered that he could live a free and full life being “actually myself…I don’t have to put on all this air to be somebody.”   This outlook is showing a lot of wisdom, that the basis of recovery starts with learning to love and care for yourself. He learned how to get over his anxieties of how he came across to other people, and that led him into a career-inhibiting haze of alcohol.  Once he realized that he could be accepted as himself, he found this freeing truth enough to change his life.

It all starts with a moment of clarity, in which an addict realizes the harm he or she is doing to the well being of his or her self and others, and so seeks out help.  Because Bradley Cooper achieved a moment of clarity, we reap the benefits of his talent and creativity of a man deeply aware of and in tune with himself. 

Alcohol Poisoning and Detox

Posted on: April 27th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Poisoning and Detox

People that abuse alcohol regularly can put themselves in very serious danger when they drink. When people binge drink often, their tolerance for consuming large amounts of alcohol continues to increase. They may no longer be aware of how much is too much and are at a high risk for accidental alcohol poisoning.

An alcoholic or a heavy binge drinker may think that they can drink however much they want without experiencing any consequences. However people with these kinds of addictions can suffer from alcohol poisoning and end up in the emergency room. It is not only a painful experience it can also be deadly in many cases.

Alcohol poisoning can occur even for people that are very accustomed to drinking heavily. Someone may not realize how much they are actually consuming especially when they are already intoxicated. After going through alcohol poisoning the victim will most likely go through a period of withdrawal during which they can choose to enter detox.

Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning

When someone experiences alcohol poisoning, it usually happens when they have consumed a very large amount of alcohol in a short period of time. Even though people in the U.S. consume alcohol regularly a surprisingly large amount of people experience accidental alcohol poisoning. According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are about 2,200 deaths per year related to alcohol poisoning which averages to about 6 per day.

Many people don’t understand the limits of alcohol tolerance in the body and are unaware that they are consuming more than their body can handle. When someone has alcohol poisoning it is because the high volume they have consumed is flooding the bloodstream and is interfering with vital functions of the brain such as breathing, heart rate and temperature. Because the liver can only process a certain amount of alcohol at a time, too much will mean that the toxins are flooding the body.

Alcohol poisoning can cause many severe reactions in the body including-

  • Vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Low body temperature (hypothermia)
  • Dehydration
  • Irregular heart rate
  • Slow breathing (less than eight breaths a minute)
  • Irregular breathing (long gaps between breaths)
  • Blue tinged or pale skin
  • Unconsciousness or passing out

If someone seems heavily intoxicated, it is a good idea to become familiar with the signs of alcohol poisoning so that you can recognize when they need medical help. If someone is passed out or it seems like they are having trouble breathing it is crucial to call 911 as soon as possible. In order to prevent alcohol poisoning from becoming fatal, the person will need immediate medical attention.

It can be difficult to recognize the symptoms of alcohol poisoning in yourself but it is crucial if you are drinking alone or the people around you are too intoxicated to notice that you need help. If you find your breathing or heart rate slowing down and you feel cold or are shivering then you might need to go to the hospital. Getting medical help in time can save your life and prevent your body from shutting down.

Detoxing from Alcohol Poisoning

When someone experiences alcohol poisoning they may go through a period of withdrawal afterward as their body tries to rid itself of the toxins. They may feel very uncomfortable or be in a lot of physical pain as they recover from the poisoning. In the same way that an alcoholic goes through withdrawal, large amounts of alcohol can lead to intense detox in the period afterward.

For someone who has gone through alcohol poisoning, they might consider going to a detox center to help them recover from their experience. Consuming alcohol to the point of nearly dying means that you do not have a safe or healthy relationship to the drug. Even though alcohol is legal that does not mean it is normal for the body to be flooded with that many toxins.

Detox can give you a chance to rid your body of all the chemicals that are making you dependent on alcohol. Having an experience with alcohol poisoning can be a wake up call for people because they realize that they are not able to drink responsibly. There are plenty of detox centers available for people who have been through alcohol poisoning and need to get the drug out of their system.

Although drinking is meant to be a social behavior, it can sometimes turn into a dangerous habit that can mean your life is at stake. Alcohol poisoning deaths are an unfortunate reality in this country as people are not able to control their drinking or don’t know their limit. Avoiding alcohol can be a safe alternative to a risky habit.

If you want to quit drinking, contact a detox center and a rehab treatment program in your area today.