Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘alcohol abuse’

Change Your Relationship with Alcohol

Posted on: February 22nd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Changing Relationship Alcohol

For many Americans, drinking alcohol has become a part of daily life. People drink after work, on the weekends, during holidays and celebrations. Therefore changing drinking patterns requires changing some aspects in a persons lifestyle. However, making these adjustments with your relationship to alcohol can change your life for the better and transform your health.

There are many reasons that alcohol can have negative consequences on your life even if you don’t drink regularly and wouldn’t consider yourself addicted. Alcohol takes its toll on the body and causes changes in the brain. It can lead to mood changes, depression, anxiety and a number of physical health issues.

The relationship that people have with alcohol can be harmful to their well-being too especially if they are mentally dependent on it. They may start to believe that they can’t have a good time, relax after work or feel comfortable socializing without having some drinks. That dependent relationship with alcohol can make you feel powerless and too focused on the act of drinking rather than experiencing life as it is.

Changing your relationship with alcohol means learning to find other ways to have fun and feel calm and relaxed that are healthier for your mind and body. Instead of seeing alcohol as the only means to achieve a certain state of mind, you can explore other options that will not have the same negative consequences. When you cut down or completely quit drinking you can discover the other things that life has to offer without relying on alcohol to fulfill your needs.

Without alcohol you can enjoy better physical and mental health, more freedom and a more positive perspective. Drinking can limit you in ways that you don’t realize until you rid yourself of a dependency on alcohol.

Alcohol Induced Cirrhosis

Posted on: January 28th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Induced Cirrhosis

Alcohol abuse is something that not only takes its toll on someone’s personal life but it can also cause very serious damage to the body. Alcohol is a dangerous toxin that, when consumed in large amounts over a period of many years, can lead to physical health problems. The liver is one of the areas of the body that is most damaged by alcohol and many alcoholics even develop cirrhosis.

Cirrhosis is a liver disease that is most often linked with alcohol abuse and the effect that drinking has on the liver. The liver’s job in the body is to filter out toxins, break down proteins, and create bile to help absorb body fat. Heavy alcohol consumption taxes the liver and starts to replace healthy tissue with scar tissue resulting in cirrhosis.

Over time and with continued alcohol abuse, cirrhosis can cause the liver to stop functioning properly due to the increasing scar tissue. Cirrhosis typically develops when the person is between the ages of 30 and 40 as they start exhibiting symptoms such as jaundice or yellowing of the skin, hypertension resulting in increased blood pressure, and skin itching. An alcoholic will start to develop cirrhosis after drinking heavily for about eight years or so.

Cirrhosis can lead to complications such as a buildup of fluid in the stomach, encephalopathy or mental confusion, internal bleeding and other problems. Although cirrhosis cannot be completely reversed, the progress of the disease can be slowed so that some of the more severe symptoms don’t appear. The first step in treating cirrhosis is for the individual to stop drinking alcohol and detoxify their body from their dependency.

Some types of medication and better nutrition can improve some of the symptoms of cirrhosis but the most important thing is to stay sober permanently for better health.

Are All Alcoholics Impulsive?

Posted on: December 30th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcoholics Impulsive

Everyone who develops alcoholism has their own circumstances, personal history and other factors that caused their substance abuse problem. However, there are certain traits that many people with addictions tend to share such as the tendency to act impulsively. For alcoholics, impulsivity is one of the classic characteristics of people susceptible to dependency.

It is important for alcoholics to be aware of their impulsive nature, especially when they are in recovery and need to be vigilant about preventing a relapse. Alcoholism and impulsive behaviors have almost always been linked and many studies have found that the risk for both issues are connected. People that are impulsive are often seeking novelty or new sensations which can also lead to alcohol abuse.

In a sense, alcoholism itself is a type of impulse control issue that can never fully be resolved except by removing the substance from the person’s life. People with impulse control issues tend to act self-destructively and engage in harmful behavior that impairs their functioning. Alcoholics behave the same way but much of their impulsive and harmful actions center around alcohol.

Studies have revealed that alcoholics have an imbalance of certain neurotransmitters in the brain which can cause impulsive behavior. Alcohol use can actually increase the effects of the neurotransmitters that cause impulsivity. Many alcoholics already have impulsive behavior due to their brain structure and drinking only increases those tendencies.

This is one of the reasons why alcoholics can only recover if they remain completely abstinent from any alcohol use. Their impulsive nature may always be present to a certain extent but they can learn to channel it and avoid using alcohol as an outlet for their compulsions. Sobriety can also help decrease impulsivity and make it easier for alcoholics to moderate their behavior as much as possible.

Alcohol Increases Effects of Cigarettes

Posted on: December 13th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Increases Cigarettes Effects

People that drink alcohol regularly often also smoke cigarettes when they are out drinking. It is also very common for alcoholics to also struggle with cigarette addiction simultaneously. Why are the two problems so closely connected?

One of the reasons that people smoke when they drink, whether they are aware of it or not, is that nicotine helps offset that sedative effects of alcohol. The body may be seeking something to counteract the slow reaction times and other issues that go along with consuming alcohol. Another possible cause is that alcohol actually increases the rewarding effects of nicotine when the two substances are consumed together.

Studies have shown that when compared to a placebo drink, alcohol tended to enhance the pleasure and calming effect of cigarettes with nicotine. Even a fairly low dose of alcohol can elicit these effects, according to the study, which explains why people who drink have a very hard time quitting smoking. The interaction of the two drugs makes it very common for people in alcohol recovery to continue being addicted to cigarettes for some time.

Because cigarettes combat some of the effects of alcohol and alcohol in turn increases the effects of nicotine, people make a strong association with both drug habits. Alcoholics in recovery who still smoke may feel a stronger craving for alcohol when they have a cigarette. Someone who has quit smoking may relapse and smoke a cigarettes if they have had a few drinks.

For optimal health and to avoid the drug habits influencing one another, it can be beneficial to quit both smoking and alcohol at the same time. Both alcohol and cigarettes are toxins that cause cravings for one another and affect recovery. Quitting both can be challenging but it will create a faster path to sobriety and increased wellness.

Addiction and Memory Loss

Posted on: December 8th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Addiction and Memory Loss

Drug abuse can have a devastating effect on a person’s personal life as well as their physical well-being. Repeated abuse of alcohol and other drugs can cause damage to essential functions in the body, especially in the brain. Addicts who have been abusing drugs for many years often experience memory loss and other problems with their cognitive functioning.

Hundreds of studies show a significant link between substance abuse and memory loss which as a result affects things like learning, language and comprehension. When a person experiences a blackout during alcohol or drug use, for example, it prevents the brain from completing the process of forming memories. Persistent drug use can cause not only issues with recalling recent events but also long term memory loss.

Drug use affects the hippocampus which is essentially the brain’s memory-storage system. Someone who becomes heavily dependent on drugs like alcohol will start to see long-lasting effects to their memory and brain function. They may begin to struggle with learning new things and have trouble recalling details such as birthdays and other important dates.

In some of the worst cases of addiction, people can develop serious brain damage leading conditions such as dementia. This typically occurs with excessive drinking over a long period of time and deals with issues of memory, learning and cognitive skills. Alcoholic dementia is a serious condition that is difficult and nearly impossible to reverse in some cases.

For people that are struggling with an addiction and are starting to experience some memory loss it is crucial to quit so that they can reverse some of the damage to their brain. Once sober, most addicts can start to see their cognitive function improve gradually over time. Getting treatment can help prevent further substance abuse from damaging memory and learning beyond repair.