Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘stress’

Young Lawyers Alcohol Abuse

Posted on: November 15th, 2018 by emarketed No Comments

Young Lawyers Alcohol Abuse

There is a common stereotype in movies and tv shows depicting the alcoholic lawyer who reaches for the bottle due to the stress of his job. Unfortunately, there is some truth to this stereotype as studies show lawyers are significantly more prone to alcoholism than the general population. As many as 36.6 of lawyers in one study had behaviors showing exhibiting issues of  problem drinking.

Surprisingly, this problem is only progressing further with the younger millennial generation of lawyers practicing now. The current generation in their 20s and early 30s tend to have more serious drinking habits due to financial stress, the high cost of living, and student loan debt. Young lawyers such as junior associates tend to drink the most because of these generational problems coupled with a highly stressful job.

Lawyers have demanding careers with long hours and frequently low professional satisfaction. They also have higher rates of mental health problems including depression and anxiety and often turn to alcohol to self-medicate. Alcohol becomes their solution to cope with the many issues that they face because of money, stress and very little free time.

The pattern of drinking frequently begins in law school when students party as a way to alleviate the stress of studying. When they take on full time jobs as lawyers, alcohol can take on a different role of calming their anxiety. Many will end a difficult day by going to happy hour with coworkers, as drinking often become part of the work culture in the legal profession.

Drinking may be thought to temporarily relieve stress for people with stressful jobs but ultimately it causes more psychological and behavioral issues that could endanger their career. Lawyers that abuse alcohol are likely to see it begin to affect their ability to work over time. Young lawyers with long term alcohol abuse problems need to address their issues with treatment and recovery.

Adjustment Disorder – Unable to Cope with Change

Posted on: October 20th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Adjustment Disorder - Unable to Cope with Change

Stress and anxiety can lead to different kinds of illnesses with specific issues that need to be addressed. People that have a particularly hard time dealing with major changes such as moving to a new city, starting a new job, switching schools or breaking up with someone may have a problem known as adjustment disorder. Although anyone may feel stressed out about a big change in their life, people with this disorder have persistent symptoms of anxiety that occur after a major life event.

Adjustment disorder can begin once an unexpected change occurs that carries a strong emotional effect. If a child suddenly moves to a new city or state or their parents separate then that type of change can have a major impact on them. It is normal for kids or even adults to feel anxious and upset when they encounter change but if those persist for months and they have trouble moving on then they may have developed symptoms of adjustment disorder.

When someone develops adjustment disorder it means that their environmental stressors have exceeded their resources for coping. Some degree of anxiety is normal when you do something out of your comfort zone but when your reaction becomes disproportionate to the event taking place then it is considered a mental health issue. Adjustment disorder is similar to situational depression which leads to crying spells and waves of anger triggered by certain events.

If you have adjustment disorder it can make it difficult to adapt to new situations and learn to feel more comfortable with changes over time. You might find it difficult to bounce back from your feelings of depression and anxiety that were triggered by a new experience. Talking to a professional about your feelings can help you address the symptoms of adjustment disorder and learn strategies to cope with change.

Careers with the Highest Depression Rates

Posted on: July 9th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Careers with the Highest Depression Rates

Certain jobs can create more stress, worry and may negatively affect employees who are involved in the industry. Issues such as lack of inactivity at sedentary jobs, high pressure environments, social isolation, and exposure to toxins can all be factors that contribute to depression on the job. Stress is a factor in almost any type of career but jobs that include many of these other factors tend to have higher rates of mental health issues like depression.

Some of the careers with higher rates of depression are in jobs that are very demanding but with relatively low pay such as food service staff and salespeople. This type of job involves a lot of physical exertion and customers can treat employees very rudely. About ten percent of workers in food service reported experiencing a major episode of depression in the last year.

Careers that involve caring for others and helping those in need can also lead to higher rates of depression. Jobs such as working in a nursing home as well as social and healthcare workers all can be stressful and detrimental to a person’s health. Being around people that are sick, helping abused children, or dealing with people experiencing crisis and trauma can take its toll on a person’s well being.

Other very demanding jobs that have high rates of depression include teachers, administrative support staff, maintenance and ground workers, financial advisors and accountants. These jobs can involve a lot of pressure and stress to perform well and cope with complicated problems. Careers with plenty of responsibility, long hours and little flexibility can cause people to develop symptoms of depression.

People may not be aware that the type of career that they choose can impact their mental health. Self-care is important in every career field and taking time off can help minimize the effects of depression.

Demand for Anxiety Treatment in College

Posted on: April 25th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Demand for Anxiety Treatment in College

Mental illness is something that more and more young people are struggling with as they try to make it through their education. With overwhelming academic schedules and the pressure to succeed, college students are suffering from anxiety in record numbers. Students are experiencing high amounts of stress that they are unable to cope with which is leading to serious mental health issues.

College campuses are facing an unprecedented demand for counseling services and many are unable to keep up with the high volume of students in need. Between 2009 and 2015 the number of students visiting counseling centers increased by about 30 percent on average in spite of a decrease in enrollment rates. Many students going to counseling on college campuses have attempted suicide or engaged in self-harm.

Studies have shown that about 61 percent of students in a college survey felt a sense of overwhelming anxiety. This is partially due to busy workloads and students burning out on intense academic demands at their school. The pressure to succeed can lead to college kids struggling so much with anxiety and other mental health issues that they are forced to drop out of school.

Many college campuses are working to meet the high demand for mental health services by providing depression screenings and more counseling clinics to help students. Some universities are adding more mental health clinicians so that students are not left behind at the busy counseling offices. However, most counseling centers are still working with limited resources and counselors are struggling to keep up with the large volume of students seeking help.

In order to meet the growing demand for mental health care, college campuses need more funding so that they can help every student with anxiety or other issues. If colleges can allocate more resources to their counseling services they may be able to keep more students in school.

UCLA Offers Voluntary Mental Health Screening For All Students

Posted on: October 6th, 2017 by The Gooden Center No Comments

UCLA Offers Voluntary Mental Health Screening For All Students

College can be a stressful time for many students who are going through a difficult transitional phase and facing a lot of pressure in school. UCLA recently announced that they will be offering free mental health screenings for incoming students as well as treatment for those who need it. The school is hoping to reduce the number of students suffering from depression and anxiety and give them the opportunity to get help before their symptoms worsen.

Students often struggle with issues of perfectionism, worrying about their grades and coping with fears of failure and the stress of handling difficult courses. They are also learning to live on their own, pay their own bills and deal with being independent from their family. College life can become overwhelming for many kids who start to exhibit symptoms of anxiety and depression because they are not able to balance these issues and adjust to changes.

The UCLA chancellor Gene Block announced the new mental health screening and treatment program in September as part of an effort to combat depression at the school and also reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and receiving treatment. All mental health screenings are voluntary for incoming freshman students and transfer students to get a clinical assessment and know more about the state of their own mental health. The screening is part of the many options available for new student orientation that are designed to ease the transition into college.

The screening focuses on mental health issues including depression and related traits such as anxiety, mania and suicidal tendencies. Any student that exhibits symptoms of these issues via the screening will be offered treatment through the UCLA program. The screenings are now offered to new students but eventually will be made available to the entire UCLA community.

Reducing Mental Illness in College

When the chancellor announced the new program he spoke about how much depression affects the college community and ultimately the whole world. With 350 million people suffering from depression worldwide it is still a widespread and persistent mental illness that unfortunately remains overlooked and understudied. Block expressed concern that depression has not yet been identified as a number one health issue and still continues to affect all ages and backgrounds.

The free mental health screenings are part of the UCLA Depression Grand Challenge which is a campus wide effort to reduce the both the health and economic impact of depression by half between now and the year 2050. The new screening and treatment program is thought to be the first-ever campus wide mental health assessment in any university. Chancellor Block is now focusing on the importance of mental health understanding and implementing policies and practices that benefit the students and faculty.

The screening itself consists of an online survey that takes a few minutes to fill out and provides them with the option of taking a free cognitive behavioral treatment online. The treatment is a self-guided program that will help the individual identify their problem areas and teach them to think and react differently to certain issues and situations. Students that are identified as having greater needs will be referred to a psychologist or treated within the UCLA network of therapists.

Identifying Depression Early

One of the reasons this type of screening is so beneficial to students is that it will allow them to identify their own symptoms of depression early on before they experience more stress and pressure in school. Depression can negatively affect a student’s ability to adjust to college life and can hurt their future if they are struggling with academic issues or feel hopeless about their career outlook. Relationships can be a difficult issue in college as many students are just beginning to take dating more seriously.

If depression derails a student during their college experience it could affect them later on as an adult as they try to get started in their career. Identifying and treating depression as early as possible can help students get back on track and have a more fulfilling experience in school that will adequately prepare them for their adult life. College students are just beginning to establish their life trajectory so improving their mental health is crucial at that stage in their development.

One of the goals of this type of screening is to help students learn to be more compassionate to themselves and to reduce the stigma surrounding depression. College students often worry about getting perfect scores and how their grades affect them instead of learning to accept mistakes. They need to practice more self-care and feel less ashamed about getting help for their issues.

If students can feel more comfortable about receiving treatment and making efforts to work on better mental health then they are more likely to fare better throughout college.