Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘prescription drug addiction’

What is an Accidental Overdose?

Posted on: March 18th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
What is an Accidental Overdose?

Most cases of drug overdose that are not fatal are considered accidental overdoses unless the person was attempting suicide. When a person dies from an overdose the medical examiner will need to determine whether the overdose was intentional or unintentional. If a person’s overdose is determined to be intentional then it can be assumed the individual was committing suicide.

An accidental overdose can come in many different forms depending on the type of drug the person used and their intention in taking it. In many cases if the person is an addict they may have taken more than their own tolerance could handle and end up overdosing. This happens frequently when users attempt to quit for a period of time and then start using the amount that they used to without realizing that they have lost their tolerance.

In other cases of overdose the person may have taken the drug accidentally because it was laced with something else or they mistakenly thought it was another substance. This is also a case where the person does not have a tolerance for the drug and their system cannot handle it. A less common occurrence but equally dangerous situation is when another person gives them a dangerous drug either intentionally or unintentionally and they are poisoned.

The only incidence where an overdose is not considered accidental is when a person purposefully takes too much of a drug because they intend to end their own life or otherwise harm themselves. Being aware of the dangers of a particular drug, always knowing what you are taking and evaluating your own tolerance can help prevent accidental overdose.

What is an Accidental Overdose?

What You Should Know About Antipsychotic Medication

Posted on: December 31st, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Antipsychotic Medication

Certain mental illnesses may cause symptoms of psychosis or psychotic episodes which can be debilitating and even life-threatening for the sufferer. Psychosis is a problem in which a person’s thinking becomes distorted so that they lose their sense of reality. People with psychosis can experience delusions and hallucinations that may cause them to behave erratically or even violently.

For an individual struggling with psychosis, one of the most essential ways to manage the symptoms is through antipsychotic medication. This type of medication is prescribed most often to people with mental illnesses like schizophrenia which causes hallucinations and psychotic episodes or bipolar disorder which can include manic episodes with symptoms of psychosis. People with bipolar disorder may take them temporarily when they are experiencing an episode while other psychotic disorders may require long term use.

Antipsychotics help manage symptoms of psychosis by blocking the activity of a neurotransmitter called dopamine. Psychosis can occur when dopamine levels in the brain are too high. The medication effectively reduces dopamine so that hallucinations subside in a few days and delusions are reduced within a couple of weeks.

The use of antipsychotics can also help stabilize a person’s mood and may be used for a number of other mental illnesses. Many can cause short term side effects such as nausea, drowsiness, dizziness, and vomiting but the symptoms usually subside during long term use. Some neurological side effects can occur such as spasms, tremors and restlessness but these sometimes go away once dosage is dropped.

Whenever this type of medication is used, it is important for the patient to be closely monitored to gauge side effects and determine if it is effective at reducing psychosis. Antipsychotics can be potentially life-saving for people suffering from psychosis but they should be taken with the help of a professional to assess their effectiveness.

What is Opiophobia?

Posted on: October 3rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opiophobia

With the opioid addiction crisis growing in the U.S. there are other issues surrounding painkillers that are becoming problematic. Because opioids have led to such high rates of overdose, a new trend of opiophobia has led to some people avoiding medication even to cope with chronic pain. Fear of the consequences of taking opioids is causing both doctors and patients to avoid prescription painkillers even when there are legitimate medical reasons for using them.

Although opioids can be addictive in many cases, some patients who are experiencing chronic pain can still benefit from controlled use of the medication. Misinformation about the medical value of opioids has been leading many people to avoid them at all costs and they are suffering from serious pain problems as a result. Even though opioid addiction is something to seriously consider before taking medication, there are some instances where it can be life saving.

Health care providers who are too hesitant to provide patients with opioid prescriptions may be allowing them to struggle with pain unnecessarily. Excessive regulation and insufficient medical use of opioids can be devastating problems for people who suffer from chronic pain. Unfortunately some of the efforts to combat addiction have led to reduced access to opioids for the people that truly need them.

It is important for people in the medical industry and patients alike to be educated about the dangers of opioids but also the instances in which they are useful and necessary. Even though it is a top priority to curb the high rates of abuse and overdose, avoiding opioids at all costs can also be problematic in other ways. Finding a balance between regulating powerful medications and having them available for those in need is a complicated issue that needs to be addressed in order to help minimize the damage surrounding the opioid crisis.

Opioid Abuse in Workplace: Some Industries Hit the Hardest

Posted on: September 27th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opioid Abuse in the Workplace

The opioid epidemic is an issue that has been spreading across the nation in recent years but certain demographics have been hit harder than others. Opioid addiction has affected not only specific age groups but also certain types of industries more than others. Where a person works can be another factor in their vulnerability for developing a problem with opioids.

The workers that have been affected most by the opioid crisis are those in the construction industry. Nearly a quarter of the opioid-related overdose deaths in the state of Massachusetts were among people who worked in construction. High rates of overdose also occurred in industries such as farming, fishing and forestry which had five times as many deaths as other workers in the state.

These types of jobs may be linked to higher rates of abuse and overdose because they physically demanding and are often linked to workplace injuries. It is possible that workers get hooked on opioids following an injury due to the medication they are prescribed. The stress of their jobs may also influence them to seek relief from prescription drugs that offer a feeling of euphoria.

In general, studies found that people in industries without much job security were more likely to abuse opioids. It is possible that opioids provide a way for people to return to work quickly following an injury. In industries with high rates of injuries and low job security, workers may not want to risk losing their job and rely on opioids to get them through the work day.

Although the opioid crisis has impacted people from all walks of life, certain types of jobs may lead to more issues with opioids than others. Education and treatment are crucial in reducing the number of overdose deaths in any industry in the U.S.

Brett Favre was Abusing Alcohol During the NFL Career

Posted on: June 5th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Abusing

Legendary athlete Brett Favre has had an amazing career with the NFL but his success did not stop him from struggling with dark times and issues of addiction. The former Green Bay Packers quarterback spent 3 stints in rehab as he fought an addiction to both alcohol and painkillers. Throughout his time in the NFL, Favre recovered and relapsed several times while the public was mostly unaware.

Favre first entered rehab in 1996 when he was at the height of his fame and success with the Packers to address his problems with drinking and addiction to Vicodin. He has said that at one point he took 12 tablets of Vicodin at a time. At the time he wasn’t convinced that he had a problem but was talked into going to rehab by people in his life that were concerned about his drinking and asked him to attend.

The football star was resistant to treatment in his first rehab stay and found it too hard to admit that he had an issue with alcohol. Even after 28 days of treatment during his first stay he ended up in rehab again several years later after relapsing. His third and final stay in rehab finally helped him realize that he needed to change his ways as he found it difficult to make it through normal social situations without having several drinks.

His days of drinking and abusing painkillers are behind him after he began to understand how it was affecting his personal life. Now that Favre is sober he has since retired from football in the NFL which he played for nearly 20 years. He was a hard working athlete who played 321 straight games during his career which is a record for a quarterback.