Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘alcoholism’

Young Lawyers Alcohol Abuse

Posted on: November 15th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Young Lawyers Alcohol Abuse

There is a common stereotype in movies and tv shows depicting the alcoholic lawyer who reaches for the bottle due to the stress of his job. Unfortunately, there is some truth to this stereotype as studies show lawyers are significantly more prone to alcoholism than the general population. As many as 36.6 of lawyers in one study had behaviors showing exhibiting issues of  problem drinking.

Surprisingly, this problem is only progressing further with the younger millennial generation of lawyers practicing now. The current generation in their 20s and early 30s tend to have more serious drinking habits due to financial stress, the high cost of living, and student loan debt. Young lawyers such as junior associates tend to drink the most because of these generational problems coupled with a highly stressful job.

Lawyers have demanding careers with long hours and frequently low professional satisfaction. They also have higher rates of mental health problems including depression and anxiety and often turn to alcohol to self-medicate. Alcohol becomes their solution to cope with the many issues that they face because of money, stress and very little free time.

The pattern of drinking frequently begins in law school when students party as a way to alleviate the stress of studying. When they take on full time jobs as lawyers, alcohol can take on a different role of calming their anxiety. Many will end a difficult day by going to happy hour with coworkers, as drinking often become part of the work culture in the legal profession.

Drinking may be thought to temporarily relieve stress for people with stressful jobs but ultimately it causes more psychological and behavioral issues that could endanger their career. Lawyers that abuse alcohol are likely to see it begin to affect their ability to work over time. Young lawyers with long term alcohol abuse problems need to address their issues with treatment and recovery.

Alcoholism and Ultimatums

Posted on: November 10th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcoholism and Ultimatums

When you are dealing with someone close to you who has a drinking problem it can be frustrating and painful knowing that you can’t stop their behavior. You might feel tempted to try to control the situation by giving them an ultimatum– “stop drinking or our relationship is over”. You need to be cautious about giving loved ones an ultimatum because addiction is complex and it can be hard to tell whether it will be effective in changing the situation.

Although it may feel like the right thing to ask an alcoholic to choose either you or drinking because you have had enough of their actions, it is important to understand that your demands may not be as realistic as you think. When a person is physically and mentally addicted to alcohol, their drinking behavior may be beyond their own control. They might try to quit at least temporarily to appease you or avoid the consequences of your ultimatum but it may not last permanently.

Ultimatums may not always be the best solution because it is impossible to control another person’s decisions and actions, especially an alcoholic. If your goal is to get a person to stop drinking then an intervention is usually the format that tends to get better results. The key is to help them realize for themselves how much their drinking affects others so that they make the choice to get help.

Quitting an addiction often requires the addict to come to the realization on their own that they need help. An ultimatum may only be useful if you want to give yourself space or improve your family life by staying away from addictive behavior. It is a legitimate choice to end a relationship because you are frustrated with a person’s addiction, but getting them to permanently change will require a more serious intervention.

Aggression and Alcoholism

Posted on: October 18th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Aggression and Alcoholism

People all react to alcohol differently and may exhibit unique behavior when they are intoxicated. However, there is a very strong correlation between alcohol and aggression or even in some cases violent behavior. Some individuals may be more likely to become aggressive than others but in general the majority of aggressive acts committed tend to involve alcohol.

Aggression most often occurs in men who have trait anger or who tend to be angry more often than others. People with less anger management will start to become aggressive when they drink alcohol. This is because alcohol tends to bring out a person’s natural tendencies toward anger or aggression.

Alcohol causes people to express their anger more frequently and aggressively so that they have a heightened response when provoked. In cases of alcoholism, the relationship between anger and intoxication can become more severe as their drinking escalates. A person with angry tendencies who develops an addiction to alcohol may lose their ability to control their aggressive behavior.

When an alcoholic becomes aggressive it can be very problematic especially in familial or  intimate relationships.  Alcoholism and domestic violence are also strongly linked in many cases especially when anger issues are untreated.

If someone has a tendency to become angry easily then consuming alcohol can be very dangerous for them and the people around them. It is important for alcoholics with aggressive behavior to get treatment so that they can learn to cope with their anger in more healthy  and constructive ways. If you know someone who becomes aggressive when they drink then it might be a good idea to stage an intervention so that you can prevent any further harm from taking place.

 

Alcohol Abuse and Insomnia

Posted on: August 5th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Abuse for Insomnia

It is common for people who abuse alcohol to experience disrupted sleep and end up in a vicious cycle of insomnia and addiction. Sleep disorders and substance abuse often go hand in hand as mind altering chemicals can make it harder for the body to function normally and get the rest it needs. Sleep problems tend to exacerbate substance abuse and vice versa because the two problems are so closely related.

For someone that doesn’t have a sleep disorder, they will typically experience regular patterns in their periods of sleep and go through the two phases of REM and non-REM sleep. The process of sleep is dictated by an interaction of chemicals in the brain including norepinephrine and serotonin. Alcohol abuse can affect the level of chemicals in your brain which can begin to disrupt sleep patterns and lead to insomnia.

People with insomnia might be able to fall asleep initially be self-medicating with alcohol but over time it will make it harder for them to maintain regular sleeping patterns. Alcohol is actually one of the most commonly used substances for insomnia with 28 percent of those with the sleep disorder using alcohol to help them fall asleep. People with insomnia are also more likely to develop issues with alcoholism.

In order to recover from an alcohol addiction it is important to treat issues of insomnia as the two problems can influence one another. An addict in recovery will need to address their sleep disorder as having disrupted sleep can trigger cravings and a potential relapse. There are many methods for improving sleep patterns such as the use of supplements, relaxation techniques and getting the right amount of nutrition and exercise.

One of the most important things a person can do for their health and their sleep is to maintain their sobriety. Fortunately quitting alcohol abuse and living a healthier lifestyle may significantly improve sleep patterns.

Brett Favre was Abusing Alcohol During the Prime of NFL Career

Posted on: June 5th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Brett Favre was Abusing Alcohol During the Prime of NFL Career

Legendary athlete Brett Favre has had an amazing career with the NFL but his success did not stop him from struggling with dark times and issues of addiction. The former Green Bay Packers quarterback spent 3 stints in rehab as he fought an addiction to both alcohol and painkillers. Throughout his time in the NFL, Favre recovered and relapsed several times while the public was mostly unaware.

Favre first entered rehab in 1996 when he was at the height of his fame and success with the Packers to address his problems with drinking and addiction to Vicodin. He has said that at one point he took 12 tablets of Vicodin at a time. At the time he wasn’t convinced that he had a problem but was talked into going to rehab by people in his life that were concerned about his drinking and asked him to attend.

The football star was resistant to treatment in his first rehab stay and found it too hard to admit that he had an issue with alcohol. Even after 28 days of treatment during his first stay he ended up in rehab again several years later after relapsing. His third and final stay in rehab finally helped him realize that he needed to change his ways as he found it difficult to make it through normal social situations without having several drinks.

His days of drinking and abusing painkillers are behind him after he began to understand how it was affecting his personal life. Now that Favre is sober he has since retired from football in the NFL which he played for nearly 20 years. He was a hard working athlete who played 321 straight games during his career which is a record for a quarterback.