Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

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191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘alcoholism’

Are All Alcoholics Impulsive?

Posted on: December 30th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcoholics Impulsive

Everyone who develops alcoholism has their own circumstances, personal history and other factors that caused their substance abuse problem. However, there are certain traits that many people with addictions tend to share such as the tendency to act impulsively. For alcoholics, impulsivity is one of the classic characteristics of people susceptible to dependency.

It is important for alcoholics to be aware of their impulsive nature, especially when they are in recovery and need to be vigilant about preventing a relapse. Alcoholism and impulsive behaviors have almost always been linked and many studies have found that the risk for both issues are connected. People that are impulsive are often seeking novelty or new sensations which can also lead to alcohol abuse.

In a sense, alcoholism itself is a type of impulse control issue that can never fully be resolved except by removing the substance from the person’s life. People with impulse control issues tend to act self-destructively and engage in harmful behavior that impairs their functioning. Alcoholics behave the same way but much of their impulsive and harmful actions center around alcohol.

Studies have revealed that alcoholics have an imbalance of certain neurotransmitters in the brain which can cause impulsive behavior. Alcohol use can actually increase the effects of the neurotransmitters that cause impulsivity. Many alcoholics already have impulsive behavior due to their brain structure and drinking only increases those tendencies.

This is one of the reasons why alcoholics can only recover if they remain completely abstinent from any alcohol use. Their impulsive nature may always be present to a certain extent but they can learn to channel it and avoid using alcohol as an outlet for their compulsions. Sobriety can also help decrease impulsivity and make it easier for alcoholics to moderate their behavior as much as possible.

Alcohol Increases Effects of Cigarettes

Posted on: December 13th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Increases Effects of Cigarettes

People that drink alcohol regularly often also smoke cigarettes when they are out drinking. It is also very common for alcoholics to also struggle with cigarette addiction simultaneously. Why are the two problems so closely connected?

One of the reasons that people smoke when they drink, whether they are aware of it or not, is that nicotine helps offset that sedative effects of alcohol. The body may be seeking something to counteract the slow reaction times and other issues that go along with consuming alcohol. Another possible cause is that alcohol actually increases the rewarding effects of nicotine when the two substances are consumed together.

Studies have shown that when compared to a placebo drink, alcohol tended to enhance the pleasure and calming effect of cigarettes with nicotine. Even a fairly low dose of alcohol can elicit these effects, according to the study, which explains why people who drink have a very hard time quitting smoking. The interaction of the two drugs makes it very common for people in alcohol recovery to continue being addicted to cigarettes for some time.

Because cigarettes combat some of the effects of alcohol and alcohol in turn increases the effects of nicotine, people make a strong association with both drug habits. Alcoholics in recovery who still smoke may feel a stronger craving for alcohol when they have a cigarette. Someone who has quit smoking may relapse and smoke a cigarettes if they have had a few drinks.

For optimal health and to avoid the drug habits influencing one another, it can be beneficial to quit both smoking and alcohol at the same time. Both alcohol and cigarettes are toxins that cause cravings for one another and affect recovery. Quitting both can be challenging but it will create a faster path to sobriety and increased wellness.

Athletes and Alcoholism

Posted on: December 5th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Athletes and Alcoholism

Although many athletes may have strict diets and rigorous training routines, the use of alcohol is actually widespread in the world of sports. Alcohol is used for celebration, relaxation and socializing after a big game or competition. Unfortunately, alcohol can be very detrimental to an athlete’s health and performance especially when it is regularly abused.

Drinking alcohol can affect many things that are necessary for good athletic performance such as motor skills, hydration, aerobic performance and recovery. An athlete who abuses alcohol or develops an issue with alcoholism will have more trouble managing their body composition and they may develop nutritional deficiencies. These issues can lead to an increased risk for injury and longer recovery time after being injured.

Alcohol causes a depression in central nervous system activity which can affect coordination, reaction time, balance, and judgement. Athletes who abuse alcohol may find that they are not able to perform as well, will make more mistakes and suffer serious setbacks in their competitions. They will have many short and long term health issues that can negatively affect their career if they continue to abuse alcohol on a regular basis.

Most athletes understand how important it is to give their body the right fuel and take care of their health so that they can perform at their best. When it comes to alcohol, many begin to use it to ease stress and they become addicted. Alcohol consumption can have a very negative impact on the body especially when used frequently after strenuous athletic performances.

Athletes need the right nutrients and hydration levels to recover from their competitive events and alcohol can jeopardize their ability to maintain their body for the next performance. In order to maintain optimal health and experience the best performances, athletes should limit their alcohol intake as much as possible.

Young Lawyers Alcohol Abuse

Posted on: November 15th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Young Lawyers Alcohol Abuse

There is a common stereotype in movies and tv shows depicting the alcoholic lawyer who reaches for the bottle due to the stress of his job. Unfortunately, there is some truth to this stereotype as studies show lawyers are significantly more prone to alcoholism than the general population. As many as 36.6 of lawyers in one study had behaviors showing exhibiting issues of  problem drinking.

Surprisingly, this problem is only progressing further with the younger millennial generation of lawyers practicing now. The current generation in their 20s and early 30s tend to have more serious drinking habits due to financial stress, the high cost of living, and student loan debt. Young lawyers such as junior associates tend to drink the most because of these generational problems coupled with a highly stressful job.

Lawyers have demanding careers with long hours and frequently low professional satisfaction. They also have higher rates of mental health problems including depression and anxiety and often turn to alcohol to self-medicate. Alcohol becomes their solution to cope with the many issues that they face because of money, stress and very little free time.

The pattern of drinking frequently begins in law school when students party as a way to alleviate the stress of studying. When they take on full time jobs as lawyers, alcohol can take on a different role of calming their anxiety. Many will end a difficult day by going to happy hour with coworkers, as drinking often become part of the work culture in the legal profession.

Drinking may be thought to temporarily relieve stress for people with stressful jobs but ultimately it causes more psychological and behavioral issues that could endanger their career. Lawyers that abuse alcohol are likely to see it begin to affect their ability to work over time. Young lawyers with long term alcohol abuse problems need to address their issues with treatment and recovery.

Alcoholism and Ultimatums

Posted on: November 10th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcoholism and Ultimatums

When you are dealing with someone close to you who has a drinking problem it can be frustrating and painful knowing that you can’t stop their behavior. You might feel tempted to try to control the situation by giving them an ultimatum– “stop drinking or our relationship is over”. You need to be cautious about giving loved ones an ultimatum because addiction is complex and it can be hard to tell whether it will be effective in changing the situation.

Although it may feel like the right thing to ask an alcoholic to choose either you or drinking because you have had enough of their actions, it is important to understand that your demands may not be as realistic as you think. When a person is physically and mentally addicted to alcohol, their drinking behavior may be beyond their own control. They might try to quit at least temporarily to appease you or avoid the consequences of your ultimatum but it may not last permanently.

Ultimatums may not always be the best solution because it is impossible to control another person’s decisions and actions, especially an alcoholic. If your goal is to get a person to stop drinking then an intervention is usually the format that tends to get better results. The key is to help them realize for themselves how much their drinking affects others so that they make the choice to get help.

Quitting an addiction often requires the addict to come to the realization on their own that they need help. An ultimatum may only be useful if you want to give yourself space or improve your family life by staying away from addictive behavior. It is a legitimate choice to end a relationship because you are frustrated with a person’s addiction, but getting them to permanently change will require a more serious intervention.