Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for February, 2019

Socializing with People When You Don’t Drink

Posted on: February 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Socializing with People When You Don’t Drink

When you are in recovery it can be challenging to maintain your commitment to sobriety, especially in social situations. Your coworkers might want to go out to get drinks after work or you might get invited to a party where everyone is drinking heavily. These situations don’t mean that you can’t socialize or have to remain isolated from people who drink, you simply need to develop strategies to handle it.

There can be a lot of awkward moments when you hang out with people who drink and you are sober. When someone offers you a beer or asks why you aren’t joining in you might feel uncomfortable. It can be helpful to have a plan in place so that you know how to respond to questions, cope with your feelings and safely get out of the situation if you should start feeling triggered.

You should have a prepared response for when people offer you a drink or ask about why you are sober. You don’t necessarily need to talk about your recovery if you don’t want to. You can tell them that you aren’t drinking today or that you are driving so you can’t drink which can easily and quickly end the conversation.

If you find social situations where alcohol is involved too uncomfortable you can bring a sober friend with you to make you feel less alienated. You can talk to them about what you are experiencing and they will understand and feel the same. Remember that you can always call a friend, arrange to get a ride home or leave early if you are feeling too upset or tempted to drink.

Being sober doesn’t mean completely giving up your social life, but it does mean that you need to be cautious and mentally prepared for situations where alcohol is involved.

Can You Recover if You’re Constantly Blaming Others?

Posted on: February 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Can You Recover if You’re Constantly Blaming Others?

Addiction can often cloud a person’s judgement and they may find it hard to be fully aware of their own illness. They can live in very deep denial for a long time and fail to see how their actions are hurting other people. Some may even find it easier to blame other people for their problems instead of taking responsibility for their own choices.

Shifting blame onto others is a common problem for people in recovery because it can be painful to confront your own mistakes. There are a lot of feelings of shame and failure surrounding addiction and it becomes much easier to blame other people or life circumstances instead of facing reality. It is important for people in recovery to stop placing blame on others and take ownership of their actions as difficult as it may be.

Accepting that you have made all your own choices can be painful but it helps addicts to finally acknowledge their disease. When they understand that some of their problems are related to their own choices they will have to start taking steps to change. Those who are shifting the blame elsewhere are finding a way to avoid changing their actions.

Understanding that you need to make changes and that your addiction is the problem can help people get through their state of denial. When they see that their own actions are to blame they can finally accept that they need help to quit their addiction. Getting through denial is one of the first and most important steps to starting a recovery journey.

It may take time for an addict to stop blaming others as it is a habit they have developed to shield themselves from embarrassment and pain. Accepting blame for their own actions, however, is a crucial part of recovery.  

Are We in a New Phase of Opioid Crisis?

Posted on: February 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Are We in a New Phase of Opioid Crisis?

Even though the level of opioid abuse and overdose has already reached epidemic proportions, the problem is continuing to escalate into a new and more dramatic phase. Researchers are predicting that the problem will keep growing and shift into a different form as new kinds of opioids are being consumed more often. They also predict that some of the programs aimed restricting access to prescription painkillers may not be enough to stem the tide of abuse.

One of the biggest issues that is changing the path of the opioid epidemic is the introduction of new and powerful synthetic opioids like fentanyl. This synthetic drug is 50 times more potent than heroin and even a small amount can lead to an overdose if the user doesn’t have enough of a tolerance. Fentanyl has led to overdoses in areas throughout the country and even a mass overdose where 13 people at the same party needed to be revived.

The number of overdose deaths attributed to fentanyl has been steadily rising and causing health issues all over the U.S. Fentanyl is dangerous not only because it is so potent but also due to its low “therapeutic index” or the line between a safe dose and a fatal one. It can be very easy to overdose on fentanyl because even a microgram can be too much for a person’s body to handle.

Researchers predict that fentanyl will cause an increase in opioid abuse and overdose in the near future. It may be some time before the U.S. is able to reduce instances of opioid addiction and deaths related to opioid abuse. Our current programs may not be enough to prevent the growing number of deaths resulting from both prescription opioids and fentanyl.

New tactics may be necessary to try to change the current course of the opioid epidemic.

When Depression Hurts Your Relationship

Posted on: February 23rd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

When Depression Hurts Your Relationship

For people suffering from depression it is not only an emotional problem but it also affects their personal life and the way that they function. It is an illness that affects all aspects of a person’s existence including their relationships. Romantic connections can sometimes suffer if a partner is not able to manage their depression effectively.

Depression is a mental health issue that causes distortions in a person’s thinking and perception of themselves and others. They can see things in a much more negative light than what is really true and real. Someone with depression may develop negative beliefs about their relationship that don’t reflect reality but can lead to issues of mistrust and distance.

One of the biggest issues that can come up with depression is self-doubt and low confidence. Someone with very low self-esteem may feel like they are unworthy of love or believe that their partner doesn’t care about them. Their depression can make them feel flawed and they may have problems trusting their partner as a result.

Sometimes depression can also manifest as being very critical of others and having high expectations. A depressed person may criticize their partner more often because they don’t know how to cope with their negative feelings. This can lead to more conflict and difficulties communicating.

When one person in a relationship has depression they may have certain expectations of how their partner should behave or show their love. The depressed person can easily become disappointed or feel that their relationship is failing if things don’t meet their expectations. They can start to judge themselves, their partner and their entire relationship too harshly.

Getting treatment for depression through individual therapy or combining it with couples therapy can help improve romantic relationships. Depression can sabotage even great partnerships so it is important to manage symptoms as often as possible.

Change Your Relationship with Alcohol

Posted on: February 22nd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Changing Relationship Alcohol

For many Americans, drinking alcohol has become a part of daily life. People drink after work, on the weekends, during holidays and celebrations. Therefore changing drinking patterns requires changing some aspects in a persons lifestyle. However, making these adjustments with your relationship to alcohol can change your life for the better and transform your health.

There are many reasons that alcohol can have negative consequences on your life even if you don’t drink regularly and wouldn’t consider yourself addicted. Alcohol takes its toll on the body and causes changes in the brain. It can lead to mood changes, depression, anxiety and a number of physical health issues.

The relationship that people have with alcohol can be harmful to their well-being too especially if they are mentally dependent on it. They may start to believe that they can’t have a good time, relax after work or feel comfortable socializing without having some drinks. That dependent relationship with alcohol can make you feel powerless and too focused on the act of drinking rather than experiencing life as it is.

Changing your relationship with alcohol means learning to find other ways to have fun and feel calm and relaxed that are healthier for your mind and body. Instead of seeing alcohol as the only means to achieve a certain state of mind, you can explore other options that will not have the same negative consequences. When you cut down or completely quit drinking you can discover the other things that life has to offer without relying on alcohol to fulfill your needs.

Without alcohol you can enjoy better physical and mental health, more freedom and a more positive perspective. Drinking can limit you in ways that you don’t realize until you rid yourself of a dependency on alcohol.