Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for September, 2018

Opioid Abuse in the Workplace: Some Industries Hit the Hardest

Posted on: September 27th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Opioid Abuse in the Workplace: Some Industries Hit the Hardest

The opioid epidemic is an issue that has been spreading across the nation in recent years but certain demographics have been hit harder than others. Opioid addiction has affected not only specific age groups but also certain types of industries more than others. Where a person works can be another factor in their vulnerability for developing a problem with opioids.

The workers that have been affected most by the opioid crisis are those in the construction industry. Nearly a quarter of the opioid-related overdose deaths in the state of Massachusetts were among people who worked in construction. High rates of overdose also occurred in industries such as farming, fishing and forestry which had five times as many deaths as other workers in the state.

These types of jobs may be linked to higher rates of abuse and overdose because they physically demanding and are often linked to workplace injuries. It is possible that workers get hooked on opioids following an injury due to the medication they are prescribed. The stress of their jobs may also influence them to seek relief from prescription drugs that offer a feeling of euphoria.

In general, studies found that people in industries without much job security were more likely to abuse opioids. It is possible that opioids provide a way for people to return to work quickly following an injury. In industries with high rates of injuries and low job security, workers may not want to risk losing their job and rely on opioids to get them through the work day.

Although the opioid crisis has impacted people from all walks of life, certain types of jobs may lead to more issues with opioids than others. Education and treatment are crucial in reducing the number of overdose deaths in any industry in the U.S.

My Loved One Avoids Me if I Bring Up Treatment

Posted on: September 24th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

My Loved One Avoids Me if I Bring Up Treatment

When you know someone needs help for an addiction but you find it hard to discuss it with them it can become a problem. Sometimes addicts are still deep in denial even when everyone around them can see that they are going down a dangerous path. If your loved one avoids you when you discuss their addiction with them, it could be that they refuse to recognize that they have a problem.

The important thing to understand about a person’s addiction is that it is an illness that can control how they think and behave. Their decision to avoid you has nothing to do with you but is a reflection of how their substance abuse has taken over their mind. Although it may be difficult to witness they are now wired to do everything they can to keep using drugs.

A good strategy to take is to avoid enabling this person and set limits on your relationship with them. If they ask for money, comfort or a place to stay following a binge then you should keep boundaries with them so you aren’t helping them continue their behavior. Telling someone they need treatment and then doing something to enable them is a way of sending mixed signals.

If you have tried speaking to someone one on one about their addiction they are not responsive then might be time to stage an intervention. Try to gather as many friends, family and loved ones who are concerned about the addict and organize a time and place when you can discuss the problem with them. An intervention is often the most effective way to reach someone with an addiction because they see that everyone is in agreement that they have a problem and are more likely to choose to get help.

Personality Disorder and Medication

Posted on: September 20th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Personality Disorder and Medication

While there is plenty of information that people understand about mood disorders like depression and anxiety, personality disorders are more complex and not often discussed in regards to mental health. A personality disorder can cause serious disruptions to a person’s daily life and their ability to hold a job or maintain relationships. Treatment for a personality disorder may combine psychotherapy and a number of psychiatric medications to help minimize issues with mood and other difficult symptoms.

Medication does not have the ability to cure a personality disorder in itself, but when used alongside regular psychotherapy sessions it can help alleviate some of the mood changes that the patient experiences. People with personality disorders benefit from mood stabilizers, especially those with borderline personality disorder which is often accompanied by feelings of depression and anxiety. Antidepressants which help with low mood such as Zoloft, Prozac and Wellbutrin are all useful in getting patients to feel more stable.

Some more severe personality disorders may even benefit from the use of antipsychotic medications although they are typically not considered psychotic disorders. These types of medications can be helpful in reducing anxiety, paranoid thinking, anger and impulsivity. Antipsychotic medications can include options like Haldol, Zyprexa and Clozaril which can help improve certain symptoms.

Lastly, anti-anxiety medications are also commonly used in treating personality disorders as many people may have a co-occurring issue with anxiety. Many personality disorders involve some type of anxiety and medications like Klonopin, Xanax and Valium are all helpful in reducing anxious feelings.

Some patients may need medication long-term but in most cases these prescriptions are used to provide temporary relief during treatment. Ultimately, psychotherapy can allow patients to resolve and manage the issues related to their personality disorder so that they can minimize their use of medication.

What Does the Future of Bipolar Treatment Look Like?

Posted on: September 15th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

What Does the Future of Bipolar Treatment Look Like?

Bipolar disorder is one of the most difficult mental illnesses to diagnose and treat because of its complicated shifts between different symptoms. At the present time there is no cure for bipolar disorder but strategies such as medication and cognitive behavioral therapy to help minimize symptoms and manage the illness. However some researchers are looking for different methods that could use a more holistic approach to treating the disorder in the future.

Mental illness often are closely related to issues in the brain that lead to certain mood problems and various behaviors. Medications are meant to help balance out chemicals in the brain that may be causing certain symptoms. However, researchers believe that helping to restore nerve cell health in the brain for better communication may go a long way to treat issues like bipolar disorder.

In the past it was believed that bipolar disorder was caused by an imbalance of chemicals like serotonin or dopamine which led to depressed or elevated moods. Researchers now believe that neural plasticity may play a more important role in alleviated the symptoms of mania and depression. People with bipolar disorder tend to have atrophy of neurons in certain brain areas but improving nerve cells in these areas could potentially change the path of the disorder.

Medications like lithium which are used in treating bipolar disorder were recently discovered to actually boost levels of proteins that help neurons maintain their function. This may explain why lithium has been shown to be effective as a long term treatment. Using other methods to improve the health of neurons in the brain may create a more focused and efficient way to reduce symptoms quickly.

Although more research needs to be done to determine long term results, nerve and brain health may be the focus of bipolar treatment in the future.

What is Comorbidity?

Posted on: September 11th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

What is Comorbidity?

Although having even one mental illness can be devastating, the reality is that many people struggle with more than one disorder at a time. Having two or more disorders simultaneously is known as comorbidity and it is actually very common in the field of mental health. Disorders such as social anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and substance abuse are all issues that tend to show comorbidity.

Certain problems tend to overlap with one another because they are connected in certain ways and influence each other. For example someone with social anxiety disorder may also have problems with depression because they tend to be more isolated and struggle with social interactions. Their social anxiety may cause them to become more depressed and vice versa.

Often, people with anxiety and other mental health problems may end up abusing substances as a way to cope with their symptoms leading to a dual disorder. Drinking or using drugs can temporarily alleviate symptoms but the two problems over time can worsen each other and become a complex situation that is difficult to treat. Substance abuse and mental health are closely connected in ways that must be addressed through specialized treatment.

Although comorbidity of any kind can be a challenging issue, if both disorders are treated simultaneously it is possible for patients to recover. Failing to treat one of the disorders will only lead to worsening symptoms and more complications. It is important for people with comorbid disorders to get an accurate diagnosis and treatment that is designed for multiple disorders.

Many people dealing with mental health issues may not realize that they have more than one disorder which is making it difficult for them to recover. A high quality treatment center can recognize comorbidity and provide immediate help to alleviate the symptoms of both problems over time.