Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘sober life’

Socializing with People When You Don’t Drink

Posted on: February 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Socializing with People When You Don’t Drink

When you are in recovery it can be challenging to maintain your commitment to sobriety, especially in social situations. Your coworkers might want to go out to get drinks after work or you might get invited to a party where everyone is drinking heavily. These situations don’t mean that you can’t socialize or have to remain isolated from people who drink, you simply need to develop strategies to handle it.

There can be a lot of awkward moments when you hang out with people who drink and you are sober. When someone offers you a beer or asks why you aren’t joining in you might feel uncomfortable. It can be helpful to have a plan in place so that you know how to respond to questions, cope with your feelings and safely get out of the situation if you should start feeling triggered.

You should have a prepared response for when people offer you a drink or ask about why you are sober. You don’t necessarily need to talk about your recovery if you don’t want to. You can tell them that you aren’t drinking today or that you are driving so you can’t drink which can easily and quickly end the conversation.

If you find social situations where alcohol is involved too uncomfortable you can bring a sober friend with you to make you feel less alienated. You can talk to them about what you are experiencing and they will understand and feel the same. Remember that you can always call a friend, arrange to get a ride home or leave early if you are feeling too upset or tempted to drink.

Being sober doesn’t mean completely giving up your social life, but it does mean that you need to be cautious and mentally prepared for situations where alcohol is involved.

Is Moving Away Helpful in the Recovery Journey?

Posted on: February 3rd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Is Moving Away Helpful in the Recovery Journey?

Quitting an addiction is a time of great change for people as they learn to navigate a whole new lifestyle and way of being. It may seem like relocating would add too much stress to the process but it can actually be a great way to start over and avoid many of the triggers and pitfalls associated with recovery. Moving away from your old life both literally and figuratively can be a useful way to get through some of the obstacles preventing you from becoming sober.

Attending rehab in a new city or moving to a new place after completing treatment can have its challenges but there are many important benefits. Relocating gives you a fresh start so that you can be in different surroundings with new people, a new job, and new activities to keep you occupied. No one will know about your past so you can have a clean slate without anyone knowing about your past.

Moving can also be helpful for people that are currently in a negative situation and need to create a new and more positive life. If they are surrounded by friends or even family members that abuse drugs or alcohol or toxic relationships that bring them down then moving can give them a better recovery experience. Steering clear of the triggers that could lead to relapse is much easier when you are in a completely new place.

Of course moving may not be the answer for everyone especially if they have a more supportive group of friends in their home town or a group meeting where they are making progress. Moving is only the right choice if you feel that your current situation will hold you back from fully recovering. Relocation is something important to consider as a first or final step of recovery.

Is FOMO a Part of Recovery?

Posted on: January 9th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Fear of Missing Out

Millennials came up with a term to describe the feeling of being on the outside of something that you want to be a part of. FOMO or “fear of missing out” is actually common issue that people experience when they are going through recovery. It is natural for people to worry, especially for those who have made a major lifestyle change, that they are missing out on fun and memorable experiences.

The term FOMO is something that came about due to social media and our generation’s tendency to compare their lives to others online. The fear of missing out can be pervasive, however, and can lead to dissatisfaction with life, depression and anxiety. For people in recovery, they may constantly fear that they are being excluded from the excitement of parties and drinking that their friends are still able to enjoy.

It can be helpful to analyze why we experience FOMO and find ways to understand the cause of negative thoughts or fears. For people in recovery, they often get to a point where they only remember the good times they associate with drinking and parties and forget all the reasons they decided to quit. Reminding yourself that not every drinking experience was fun and there were a lot of negative consequences can help put things into perspective.

For those who are really struggling with their fears and negative thoughts about their life, you can try to track your thoughts and talk to a therapist about them. They may give you ideas about why you are feeling this way and suggest ways to replace negative thoughts with more positive ones. Part of recovery is working through the fear of being on the outside of certain experiences you may have had in the past and learning to embrace your new lifestyle.

It Gets Better

Posted on: November 22nd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

It Gets Better

Even though facing an addiction may seem hopeless, there are many opportunities to work toward a better future. Only people who have experienced addiction firsthand will understand the destructive toll it takes on your life. When you have hit rock bottom it can be difficult to see any light at the end of the tunnel but for most people who manage to get help, things will ultimately get better.

The image surrounding addiction, especially in Hollywood, is often of the addict who can’t escape their own self-destructive tendencies and they are never able to recover. Recent films like “A Star is Born” show a main character who is destroyed by his addiction and never gets the opportunity to try to fully live sober. Even though these kinds of tragedies do occur, the majority of people who receive treatment for addiction are able to survive and lead healthy lives.

One of the biggest issues with addiction is the significant stigma that people experience with the disease. In that sense it is different than any other disease that has its normal ups and downs. When people relapse and their disease worsens temporarily, they are judged very harshly by society in a way that can jeopardize their ability to recover.

Even when someone relapses, if they are able to get the support that they need it doesn’t mean that they have failed in their recovery. As with any disease, continuing treatment can mean that it gets easier every time as they work toward permanent sobriety. Going back to treatment after a relapse is often a normal part of the process.

Although addiction is sometimes stigmatized and portrayed harshly in the media, most people find that they can become healthy and sober with the right treatment and support from peers, friends and family.

How to Get an AA Sponsor

Posted on: April 6th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

How to Get an AA Sponsor

The connections that you make in recovery can become an important element in ending an addiction. Having people you can rely on for compassion and support will make the whole process of learning to be sober much easier. One of the most crucial relationships that you can have in recovery is the connection you have with your sponsor.

An AA sponsor is someone who has successfully remained sober for a long period of time and can act as a mentor when you are getting through the difficult early stages of recovery. They provide knowledge, guidance, experience and sympathy for people who are just starting their journey to becoming sober. Sponsorship can be a critical tool in learning more about the practical aspects of quitting an addiction.

When looking for a sponsor the relationship can be informal but it is important to find someone with at least two years sobriety. The longer they have been sober the more effective their role as a mentor will be. It should be someone who is experienced enough to provide useful advice and pass on meaningful knowledge from their own life.

You can easily find a sponsor in your AA meeting as many people in these communities tend to reach out to newcomers to offer support. You might choose someone from the group that you feel comfortable with and you can rely on or someone might approach you and offer to be your sponsor. You can start with a temporary sponsor if you need immediate help until you eventually find your permanent sponsor that you want to be your long term mentor.

AA meetings are designed to be an open community where people can reach out for help. If you need a sponsor it won’t be difficult to find someone who is willing to support and mentor you.