Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘depression treatment’

4 Common Myths about Depression

Posted on: August 23rd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

4 Common Myths about Depression

 

Even though depression may be one of the most common mental health problems in the U.S. it is a topic that is rarely discussed. People have many misconceptions about depression because of the stigma behind the disease and a lack of understanding about what causes it. These are some of the prevailing myths about depression.

 

  1. Depression is all in your head

People mistakenly believe that depression is something that a person can just snap out of or shut off. While depression can partially be related to negative thoughts, it is a chronic disorder that requires treatment to manage. It is not only a psychological disorder but it also has social and biological elements as well with physical issues that need to be addressed.

 

  1. Depression is a normal part of life that will pass on it’s own

Unfortunately, many people with depression themselves believe this myth which can stop them from getting the help they need. It can be normal to feel sad from time to time but depression is a more serious issue that is too difficult to resolve alone. You don’t have to live with depression and wait for it to end, you can get help to recover.

 

  1. Depression always requires medication

Although many people have benefitted from the use of medication to treat their depression, it is only one option for treatment. Some may prefer not to use any substances to handle their symptoms and would prefer to focus on other methods including cognitive behavioral therapy. Taking medication depends on the severity of the condition as well as the individual’s personal choices.

 

  1. Depression is a weakness

Many people deal with the stigma that having depression means that you are weak and can’t handle life. The reality is that depression is a psychological condition that is not a choice and has nothing to do with how strong someone is. Getting treatment take strength and courage for people dealing with difficult feelings.

 

References

https://www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/mental-health-myths-facts

Depression in Retirement

Posted on: March 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Depression in Retirement

Most people look forward to retirement as a time to relax and spend time with family. However, depression can become an unexpected problem for people in retirement because of the sudden change to their routine. In many cases people experience a sense of purpose and value in working everyday and suddenly quitting can have a dramatic effect on their mental state.

Having a fulfilling career allows people to meet their drive to achieve something and be a provider for their family. When their career ends through retirement they may lose their sense of accomplishment that they were able to get out of working. They might feel a sense of loss, sadness, fear about their new lifestyle and confusion about who they are.

People that experience depression after retiring can cope with those feelings by finding new hobbies and activities that give them a sense of purpose and achievement. They can become active in the community by volunteering or spend more time with family. If they view retirement as an opportunity to do things they never had time for such as traveling or learning a musical instrument it can be a more positive experience.

The most important thing to do in retirement is to create a schedule for yourself so that your days don’t feel empty. An unstructured day can lead to boredom and depression so creating your own new routine can prevent you from feeling lost. Schedule time to exercise, do work around the house, visit friends and family or other activities that you want to do.

Retirement can be a major change but making the transition can be easier if you find a new purpose and create a routine. If feelings of depression persist it may be helpful to talk to a therapist and work out some of your issues surrounding retirement.

When Depression Hurts Your Relationship

Posted on: February 23rd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

When Depression Hurts Your Relationship

For people suffering from depression it is not only an emotional problem but it also affects their personal life and the way that they function. It is an illness that affects all aspects of a person’s existence including their relationships. Romantic connections can sometimes suffer if a partner is not able to manage their depression effectively.

Depression is a mental health issue that causes distortions in a person’s thinking and perception of themselves and others. They can see things in a much more negative light than what is really true and real. Someone with depression may develop negative beliefs about their relationship that don’t reflect reality but can lead to issues of mistrust and distance.

One of the biggest issues that can come up with depression is self-doubt and low confidence. Someone with very low self-esteem may feel like they are unworthy of love or believe that their partner doesn’t care about them. Their depression can make them feel flawed and they may have problems trusting their partner as a result.

Sometimes depression can also manifest as being very critical of others and having high expectations. A depressed person may criticize their partner more often because they don’t know how to cope with their negative feelings. This can lead to more conflict and difficulties communicating.

When one person in a relationship has depression they may have certain expectations of how their partner should behave or show their love. The depressed person can easily become disappointed or feel that their relationship is failing if things don’t meet their expectations. They can start to judge themselves, their partner and their entire relationship too harshly.

Getting treatment for depression through individual therapy or combining it with couples therapy can help improve romantic relationships. Depression can sabotage even great partnerships so it is important to manage symptoms as often as possible.

How to Relieve Winter Depression

Posted on: February 11th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

How to Relieve Winter Depression

The seasons can have a strong effect on our mood, especially during long winters. The cold weather, lack of sunlight and shorter days can all cause feelings of sadness and depression. People with seasonal affective disorder are particularly affected by the winter and may have more serious symptoms that they need to cope with.

One of the most common treatments for winter depression is the use of light therapy to improve the mood. During winter, people are not able to experience much sunlight especially in colder areas. Light therapy helps them get the exposure that they need to regulate their sleep schedule and fend off feelings of depression.

Melatonin supplements can also be helpful in resetting a person’s body clock back to normal. People use the hormone melatonin to help them get regular sleep but it can also be useful in improving a person’s mood during winter. Issues with the sleep/wake cycle that occur during winter can cause symptoms of depression so improving sleep can have a positive impact.

Lifestyle changes such as a healthy diet and plenty of exercise can be important factors when it comes to improving mood. Bad weather can make people less likely to get out and move around so spending some time at the gym a few times a week can be crucial. Physical health can have a big impact on mental health so focusing on lifestyle during the winter can make a big difference.

When depression symptoms are more severe, traditional methods of treatment such as talk therapy can help provide relief during the winter. For people with seasonal affective disorder, having a regular therapist is an important resource when their symptoms become problematic as seasons change. For anyone experiencing depression or seasonal depression, talking to a professional can help reduce symptoms when you are struggling.

Are You Lonely or Are You Depressed?

Posted on: October 9th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Lonely or Depressed

Depression and feelings of loneliness are often closely related and some even believe that when someone is lonely it is simply another form of being depressed. There can be a lot of confusion between the two problems as people may find it difficult to identify what they are actually feeling. It can be hard to pinpoint feelings of loneliness and whether they are a symptom of depression or if you simply need more human connection.

Loneliness comes from a deep emotional drive that human beings have to feel that they belong. They want to feel socially connected and experience intimate relationships with others. If those needs are not met or they are rejected in some way it can lead to feelings of loneliness.

When someone feels lonely it is directly related to how they feel about their relationships while depression is more a general feeling of sadness or hopelessness that doesn’t always have a direct cause. Depression is not as connected to a specific motivational drive the way that loneliness is. Someone who is depressed may have feelings of worthlessness or loss of interest that are not related to specific problems like social isolation.

One thing to keep in mind is that although loneliness and depression are two separate issues, it is very common for people to feel both lonely and depressed. Someone who suffers from depression begin to withdraw from their social relationships and isolate themselves in a way that leads to loneliness. On the other hand, not everyone who is lonely is depressed and not everyone who is depressed is lonely; it simply depends on their personal circumstances.

If you are experiencing feelings of either loneliness or depression, talk to a counselor to work on solutions to improve your mental health and connections with others.