Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘alcohol’

Alcohol Poisoning and Detox

Posted on: April 27th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol Poisoning and Detox

People that abuse alcohol regularly can put themselves in very serious danger when they drink. When people binge drink often, their tolerance for consuming large amounts of alcohol continues to increase. They may no longer be aware of how much is too much and are at a high risk for accidental alcohol poisoning.

An alcoholic or a heavy binge drinker may think that they can drink however much they want without experiencing any consequences. However people with these kinds of addictions can suffer from alcohol poisoning and end up in the emergency room. It is not only a painful experience it can also be deadly in many cases.

Alcohol poisoning can occur even for people that are very accustomed to drinking heavily. Someone may not realize how much they are actually consuming especially when they are already intoxicated. After going through alcohol poisoning the victim will most likely go through a period of withdrawal during which they can choose to enter detox.

Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning

When someone experiences alcohol poisoning, it usually happens when they have consumed a very large amount of alcohol in a short period of time. Even though people in the U.S. consume alcohol regularly a surprisingly large amount of people experience accidental alcohol poisoning. According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are about 2,200 deaths per year related to alcohol poisoning which averages to about 6 per day.

Many people don’t understand the limits of alcohol tolerance in the body and are unaware that they are consuming more than their body can handle. When someone has alcohol poisoning it is because the high volume they have consumed is flooding the bloodstream and is interfering with vital functions of the brain such as breathing, heart rate and temperature. Because the liver can only process a certain amount of alcohol at a time, too much will mean that the toxins are flooding the body.

Alcohol poisoning can cause many severe reactions in the body including-

  • Vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Low body temperature (hypothermia)
  • Dehydration
  • Irregular heart rate
  • Slow breathing (less than eight breaths a minute)
  • Irregular breathing (long gaps between breaths)
  • Blue tinged or pale skin
  • Unconsciousness or passing out

If someone seems heavily intoxicated, it is a good idea to become familiar with the signs of alcohol poisoning so that you can recognize when they need medical help. If someone is passed out or it seems like they are having trouble breathing it is crucial to call 911 as soon as possible. In order to prevent alcohol poisoning from becoming fatal, the person will need immediate medical attention.

It can be difficult to recognize the symptoms of alcohol poisoning in yourself but it is crucial if you are drinking alone or the people around you are too intoxicated to notice that you need help. If you find your breathing or heart rate slowing down and you feel cold or are shivering then you might need to go to the hospital. Getting medical help in time can save your life and prevent your body from shutting down.

Detoxing from Alcohol Poisoning

When someone experiences alcohol poisoning they may go through a period of withdrawal afterward as their body tries to rid itself of the toxins. They may feel very uncomfortable or be in a lot of physical pain as they recover from the poisoning. In the same way that an alcoholic goes through withdrawal, large amounts of alcohol can lead to intense detox in the period afterward.

For someone who has gone through alcohol poisoning, they might consider going to a detox center to help them recover from their experience. Consuming alcohol to the point of nearly dying means that you do not have a safe or healthy relationship to the drug. Even though alcohol is legal that does not mean it is normal for the body to be flooded with that many toxins.

Detox can give you a chance to rid your body of all the chemicals that are making you dependent on alcohol. Having an experience with alcohol poisoning can be a wake up call for people because they realize that they are not able to drink responsibly. There are plenty of detox centers available for people who have been through alcohol poisoning and need to get the drug out of their system.

Although drinking is meant to be a social behavior, it can sometimes turn into a dangerous habit that can mean your life is at stake. Alcohol poisoning deaths are an unfortunate reality in this country as people are not able to control their drinking or don’t know their limit. Avoiding alcohol can be a safe alternative to a risky habit.

If you want to quit drinking, contact a detox center and a rehab treatment program in your area today.

Alcohol-Related ER Visits

Posted on: April 22nd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Alcohol-Related ER Visits

Even though alcohol is a legal drug, that doesn’t mean there aren’t any serious dangers associated with it. More people than ever are ending up in the emergency room because of alcohol-related incidents causing injury. The number of alcohol-related ER visits has risen 61 percent in the last decade.

People end up in the ER for various reasons related to alcohol but some of the most common are drinking and driving accidents as well as alcohol poisoning. People are also more reckless and less inhibited when they drink which can lead to them getting hurt. These type of accidents are taking up lots of hospital resources and driving up health costs for people who are making poor decisions while drinking.

These ER visits actually represent a public health problem because it places a strain on the U.S. emergency care system. In order to combat this problem there need to be more efforts to identify and reduce binge drinking throughout the country. Binge drinking can lead to more alcohol-related incidents because people are more likely to be highly intoxicated compared to just having a few drinks over a longer period of time.

The more alcohol a person consumes in a short period of time the more they are at risk for alcohol poisoning or other related injuries. Binge drinking is defined as 4 or 5 drinks consumed within about 2 hours. Our bodies take about an hour to metabolize one drink, so this type of binge drinking can lead to serious issues with coordination and focus.

No matter how much alcohol a person has consumed, it is never safe to drink and drive. Finding a designated driver can help minimize the toll that ER visits has on our healthcare system. Reducing binge drinking can also prevent serious injuries and maintain health and safety.

10 Ways Your Body is Withdrawing from Alcohol

Posted on: April 17th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

10 Ways Your Body is Withdrawing from Alcohol

One of the hardest aspects of quitting an addiction to alcohol is the way that your body will react to abstinence. Suddenly stopping the use of a substance you are physically and mentally addicted to can be uncomfortable and even painful at times.

Many people react in different ways and have their own experience with alcohol withdrawal. However there are certain common bodily responses that most people will find happening to them. Here are 10 ways that your body responds to alcohol withdrawal.

1. Shaking and Tremors– One of the first symptoms that people experience within the first day of abstinence or even several hours after their last drink is tremors. That means your hands or even your limbs are shaking involuntarily. The tremors may be more intense if you are especially anxious about detox and your body is responding to your anxiety.

Shaking occurs because your nervous system is suddenly flooded with more activity. People get accustomed to the depressant effects of alcohol which create less stimulation for the nervous system and the brain. Without any alcohol in your system your body responds by being hyperactive because the brain is experiencing more activity than it is used to.

2. Increased Heart Rate and Breathing – The sudden surge in activity in the central nervous system can create a number of other symptoms in the body. Many people will have a rapid heart rate or quick shallow breathing. As your nervous system goes into overdrive your heart may beat faster which can also be exacerbated by feelings of anxiety.

3. Excessive sweating – People going through withdrawal may find themselves sweating heavily especially at night. As their heart rate and breathing rate increase it can trigger perspiration as a result. It is important during detox to make sure that you stay well hydrated and replenish your electrolytes when you have severe sweating symptoms.

4. Trouble Sleeping – Most people going through detox will find it very difficult to sleep and will probably need some type of non-addictive medication to get through a full night. Issues with sleeping can begin the first day and persist for some time until the person’s body adjusts to living without alcohol. Sleep issues can be caused by a lack of dopamine in the system which can put the body into a panicked “fight or flight” state making it difficult to fall asleep.

5. Anxiety or Depression – Alcohol and other substances produce so much dopamine when they are consumed that your brain slows down its own production of natural dopamine. Dopamine is a chemical that helps regulate your mood and when you suddenly quit drinking alcohol your brain is producing a much smaller amount than you are used to. This sudden drop in dopamine can cause all kinds of problems including feelings of anxiety and depression.

Your brain will need time to start producing normal amounts of dopamine instead of the depressed levels it was creating when you were drinking alcohol. Without enough dopamine you will have much higher stress levels which will cause you to feel worried, anxious and depressed in addition to making it hard to sleep. It is important to find ways to handle this extra stress so that it does not become overwhelming.

6. Delirium Tremens – The most severe kind of alcohol withdrawal that people experience is delirium tremens or DTs which can be very intense. The symptoms can occur within 48 hours of your last drink and tend to include severe confusion, seizures and hallucinations. People usually only experience delirium tremens if they suddenly quit a very severe alcohol addiction.

7. Headaches and pain– Your body is adjust to drinking alcohol on a regular basis and when you suddenly quit it may respond by causing aches and pains throughout the body. Many people get a serious headache or a feeling of achiness throughout their whole body. This pain will eventually subside but taking over the counter aspirin can help minimize the discomfort.

8. Nausea and Vomiting– Within the first day or two of withdrawal your body is likely to respond with feelings of nausea and vomiting. The chemical dependency causes your body to react and many people feel queasy or uncomfortable in their stomach.

9. Fever or Increased Temperature – Along with an increased heart rate some people may also experience an increase in their body temperature as a reaction to abstinence. Taking fever reducing medicine may be necessary to keep their body temperature from rising.

10. Mood Swings – One of the most difficult reactions that people have to abstaining from alcohol is severe mood swings. Their body is used to using alcohol to relax and calm their emotional state. Without a drink they may feel agitated, angry or tearful and sad.

Alcohol withdrawal can be painful and uncomfortable for a period of time but ultimately you will experience positive benefits for your physical and mental health by abstaining from alcohol.