Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘addiction’

Teen and Young Adult Smoking on the Decline

Posted on: June 29th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Teen and Young Adult Smoking on the Decline

The number of teens and young adults who report using cigarettes has been steadily declining over the years. Information about the dangers of smoking and changes in trends may have contributed to lower rates of smoking among young people. In spite of the progress made in reducing smoking, statistics show that 1 in 12 teens and 1 in 3 young adults still smoke cigarettes.

A study revealed that during the period between 2004 and 2010 the percentage of adolescents who said they smoked declined from a high of 12 percent to a low of 8.3 percent. Young adults aged 18 to 25 also showed a reduction in cigarette use during the same period with the number falling from 40 percent to 34 percent in 2010. Researchers believed the decline in the number of smokers was due to antismoking campaigns as well tax increases, higher prices of cigarettes and laws prohibiting the sale of cigarettes to minors.

The study also found that the number of teens and young adults who smoked every day fell as well as the number of cigarettes smoked by daily users. That means the frequency and amount of cigarettes used has declined overall among young people. The largest group of young smokers in the study included those who smoked fewer than five cigarettes a day.

The findings are encouraging when looking at the overall trend of smoking but addiction experts and health advocates feel that there is more progress to be made. The number of teens and young adults who smoke is still much too high as these young people are endangering their health and possibly their lives. Smoking remains one of the nation’s leading causes of preventable deaths and teens who get hooked early on may have more trouble quitting in the future.

Is Rock Bottom Always Necessary for Recovery?

Posted on: June 17th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

 

 

Teen and Young Adult Smoking on the Decline

The concept of hitting rock bottom is a traditional view of addiction that many people believe is a crucial part of the process of quitting. The idea behind rock bottom is that the person with an addiction will finally reach a point where they have experienced so many negative consequences from their behavior that they decide they need to get help. Rock bottom is essentially reaching the lowest point of your disease so that the only way to move forward is to admit you have a problem.

Even though rock bottom can be a useful idea in framing the narrative of addiction and understanding people’s motivation to quit, it is not how every addiction story occurs. In fact, believing that hitting rock bottom is the only way that someone can recover can sometimes be dangerous. If loved ones take no action and avoid helping an addict because they are waiting for them to hit rock bottom then they are leaving them alone to cause more damage.

For some people it may take years to finally hit rock bottom and during that time they can cause a lot of problems in their relationships, their physical and mental health and their finances. The gradual changes that they go through as a result of their addiction may become complicated to resolve once they finally do get help. Allowing those issues to build up over many years can take its toll on their lives and make recovery even more challenging.

Getting help as early as possible is usually preferable to hitting rock bottom so that addicts will not have to suffer for a long time. It is important to see if there is anything you can do to help an addict feel motivated to recover before they hit rock bottom.

The Role of Genetics in Alcoholism

Posted on: May 22nd, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
Teen and Young Adult Smoking on the Decline

Addiction tends to run in families for a few different reasons but genetic predisposition is one of the most common causes of problems like alcoholism. The environment and culture that a person grows up in can influence them to drink and use drugs but their genes can also have a powerful effect. Certain distinct sets of genes can also determine whether someone will be a heavy drinker or if they will suffer from alcohol abuse disorder.

People who drink heavily and those who are alcoholics have many genetic similarities that make them more inclined to use substances. There are distinct regions of their genes that are associated with both groups of people and there are five that are linked to alcoholism alone. The genetic variants that are specifically linked with alcoholism tend to be associated with neuronal function.

The gene variants that are associated with alcoholism are also closely connected with the genetic risk of developing other types of psychiatric disorders. This may play a role in the likelihood of someone developing both an addiction and a mental illness such as depression or anxiety. Research has revealed that overall, genetics can account for about half of the risk of developing alcoholism.

Understanding the role that genetics play in alcohol abuse disorder and other psychiatric disorders can help people prevent or manage potential illnesses. If you are aware of a genetic predisposition for alcoholism or other types of disorders then you can take measures to avoid developing these issues through abstinence, therapy and other types of lifestyle changes.

Although genetics can be a strong influence on a person’s tendency to develop addiction, their lifestyle and personal choices are the key to whether they can manage their vulnerability. Alcoholism rehab can help people who have genetic vulnerabilities to recover and learn to live sober in spite of their inherent risks.

What are “The Stages of Changes” in Addiction?

Posted on: March 8th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments
What are “the Stages of Changes” in Addiction?

Most people that have gone through recovery understand that quitting an addiction is not something that happens immediately when you give up drinking or using drugs. Abstinence is only the first step in a very long process that requires lots of different physical, emotional and spiritual changes. Most recovery programs identify six main stages of change that can help bring about permanent sobriety.

The first stage of change is the “pre-contemplation stage” where the addict may still be in denial and not yet understand all the negative consequences of their actions. They may soon move on to the “contemplation stage” where they will start to become aware of all the problems that their substance abuse is causing and think about quitting but not yet fully commit to the idea. The third stage is “preparation” in which the individual will finally make the decision to change and begin planning the steps for their recovery.

During stage four or the “action” phase the person will start taking steps toward change by entering detox or rehab where they will learn how to choose new behaviors and develop life skills. Once they complete rehab they enter the “maintentance” stage where they will work on their long-term sobriety plan and focus on relapse prevention tactics. The final stage is “termination” where the individual accepts their new image as a sober person and appreciates their new healthy lifestyle.

The stages of change model was developed as a way to explain the typical steps that a person in recovery has to go through until they are able to feel comfortable in their abstinence. Recovery is different for everyone and they may go through each stage at their own pace or even move backward and forward through each phase until they are ready to be completely sober.

Why Addicts Lie

Posted on: January 25th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Why Addicts Lie

When someone has an addiction, their behavior may change dramatically and they will begin to act in ways they never had before. They might lie, steal, cheat or break the law because they will do anything to be able to continue their addictions. Addicts usually develop a habit of lying to loved ones because they are looking for ways to avoid having to reveal the extent of their problem and be forced to change their ways.

One of the major issues that causes addicts to lie is that they are trying to avoid confrontation with the people around them. They often haven’t developed coping strategies to deal with the stresses of life such as conflict with others. The easiest way out for them is to simply lie so they won’t have to deal with an argument or cope with a problem.

Addicts tend to lie about the extent of how much they are abusing drugs because they don’t want other people to express their concern or try to convince them to quit. They might lie about going to the bar or meeting up with their dealer because they don’t want to have to explain their behavior to others. Their ultimate goal is to continue using drugs and they will say and do what they feel is necessary to keep going.

Another reason that addicts tend to lie is because deep down they feel ashamed about their behavior. Even though their addiction forces them to continue using drugs, they may feel embarrassed for people to know what they are doing. They are afraid of being judged or facing up to their own mistakes so they will lie to others to avoid confronting their own shame.

Going along with an addict’s lies can be a form of enabling so it is important to eventually speak directly to them about getting help through an intervention.