Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘sobriety’

Reasons to Attend AA Meetings and How Often to Go

Posted on: August 30th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Reasons to Attend AA Meetings and How Often to Go

 

For those who have never dealt with addiction or are still in the early stages of recovery, they may not understand the importance of twelve step meetings. People can feel resistant to going to meetings at first but over time they will start to appreciate the benefits of having group support. They can start to work toward their sobriety goals and structure their day around the meetings to keep them motivated.

 

In the early stages of recovery it can be useful to go to meetings as often as possible to help deal with more intense cravings. The first few months of sobriety can be the hardest in terms of cravings and having people to talk to about what you are going through can help you make it through. Many people attend meetings everyday when they are starting their recovery because they find it so helpful.

 

People find AA meetings useful because it gives them a safe space to discuss their addiction where they won’t be judged. Everyone in the room has been through many of the same things and it can be a very grounding and healing experience to listen and talk about some of your painful secrets. Meetings keep people connected to others in recovery so that they have support when they are going through difficult times.

 

The longer a person is in recovery, they might start to go to meetings less often when they feel stronger. However, many still attend a few meetings a week even long after they have become completely sober. The connections that they make in the meetings can help them manage what is a lifelong illness that is never fully cured.

 

AA meetings are easy to find and provide a good support system that can be beneficial even after many years of sobriety.

 

References

https://healthfinder.gov/FindServices/Organizations/Organization.aspx?code=HR0148

5 Benefits of Quitting Drinking

Posted on: August 24th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Reasons to Attend AA Meetings and How Often to Go

 

If you are considering giving up alcohol then you may be weighing the pros and cons in your mind. There are numerous benefits to quitting drinking in terms of physical, mental, social and financial health. These are some of the most important benefits of quitting alcohol.

 

  1. Feeling better/ looking younger

Drinking alcohol is very taxing on your body and causes a lot of damage to the brain, liver, heart and overall functioning. Getting the toxins out of your system will vastly improve your health and prevent the development of many chronic diseases associated with alcohol. An added bonus is that most people lose weight and start looking younger when they quit drinking.

 

  1. Improving relationships

Quitting alcohol tends to lead to more social stability and can reduce the amount of conflict in a person’s life. Alcohol also tends to isolate people when they develop an addiction. Being sober can help you to connect more to the people around you in a healthier way.

 

  1. Saving Money

Drinking can be expensive, especially for people that like to go out to bars and buy numerous drinks. The cost of alcohol can add up and for people that drink frequently they often lose a lot of money fueling their habit. Many people are amazed at how much money they are able to save once they give up drinking.

 

  1. More Stable Moods

 

Alcohol tends to heighten a person’s emotional state and leads them to go through a lot of ups and downs. Quitting will help you experience more stable emotions and find new healthier ways to cope with how you’re feeling.

 

  1. New Activities

People with drinking habits tend to spend a lot of time and energy on alcohol. Once they quit it can open a door to trying new hobbies and more positive activities to have a good time.

 

References

https://medlineplus.gov/alcoholismandalcoholabuse.html

Dealing with Negative Influences in Recovery

Posted on: May 27th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments


Reasons to Attend AA Meetings and How Often to Go

Almost everyone has a person in their life that is a negative influence on them in some way. For people with addictions, they may have friends and drinking buddies who guide them down the wrong path and have prevented them from being healthy for a long time. While in recovery, these same friends might in denial of your choice to quit and will not want to let you grow.

It is important to be able to recognize negative influences especially when you are in the early stages of recovery. You do not want all your progress to be jeopardized by a friend who coaxes you into having just one drink or using again because they can’t cope with you changing. Their negativity about your recovery can bring you down and make you feel tempted at dangerous times.

There are certain signs that a person in your life may be a negative influence. If they seem critical of your efforts to improve yourself, are avoiding facing their own addiction, or guilt trip you about your sobriety then they are probably are not able to deal with your new lifestyle. It is important to have people in your life that give you positive feedback about your choice to become sober and are going to be there to support you.

When someone becomes too much of a negative influence sometimes the best solution is to have a direct conversation with them about their behavior. You will need to tell them that you are committed to your choice to recover and if they can’t stop pushing you in the wrong direction you will need to move on. Friends who care about you will agree to accept your choices and for those who can’t, you may have to distance yourself from them.

Is FOMO a Part of Recovery?

Posted on: January 9th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Fear of Missing Out

Millennials came up with a term to describe the feeling of being on the outside of something that you want to be a part of. FOMO or “fear of missing out” is actually common issue that people experience when they are going through recovery. It is natural for people to worry, especially for those who have made a major lifestyle change, that they are missing out on fun and memorable experiences.

The term FOMO is something that came about due to social media and our generation’s tendency to compare their lives to others online. The fear of missing out can be pervasive, however, and can lead to dissatisfaction with life, depression and anxiety. For people in recovery, they may constantly fear that they are being excluded from the excitement of parties and drinking that their friends are still able to enjoy.

It can be helpful to analyze why we experience FOMO and find ways to understand the cause of negative thoughts or fears. For people in recovery, they often get to a point where they only remember the good times they associate with drinking and parties and forget all the reasons they decided to quit. Reminding yourself that not every drinking experience was fun and there were a lot of negative consequences can help put things into perspective.

For those who are really struggling with their fears and negative thoughts about their life, you can try to track your thoughts and talk to a therapist about them. They may give you ideas about why you are feeling this way and suggest ways to replace negative thoughts with more positive ones. Part of recovery is working through the fear of being on the outside of certain experiences you may have had in the past and learning to embrace your new lifestyle.

Sobriety as a New Year’s Resolution

Posted on: December 28th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Sobriety - New Year Resolution

The new year is a time when people make an effort to start over and change some of their habits for the better. It can be a good time to focus on health and well-beingg so that you live a more positive lifestyle. Sobriety can be one of the best resolutions that you make in the new year as long you have a plan to stay committed and follow through with your decision.

Becoming sober is a big change to go through and in order to succeed you will need to make a number of smaller resolutions to support your choice. Getting sober means talking to friends and family about your addiction and telling them that you want to quit. Letting other people know about your resolution can make it easier to be accountable and you will be less likely to give up.

The next step for becoming sober is seeking professional help if you have a serious addiction. You can find a therapist who specializes in addiction or you can enroll in an inpatient or outpatient treatment center to detox and get adjusted to a sober lifestyle. Quitting an addiction can be much easier in the environment of treatment and sobriety offered at a rehab center.

If your alcohol use is not severe enough to require inpatient treatment you might consider attending a twelve step program to help you get oriented with a sober lifestyle. These group meetings are designed to help people to deal with cravings and allow them to strengthen their resolve to be sober. You can also start to build a social support system with the people you meet in twelve step groups so that you have sober friends who will keep you on track with your goals.

Sobriety can be a great new year’s resolution as long as you take the right steps toward making a lasting change.