Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

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Posts Tagged ‘schizophrenia’

Young People Recover from Schizophrenia

Posted on: August 23rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Young People Recover from Schizophrenia

Although schizophrenia is known as one of the most devastating diagnoses in the realm of mental health disorders, recent studies have revealed that it is not as hopeless as previously believed. In the past it was thought that only a small minority of people with schizophrenia could recover from their disorder. However recently it was discovered that about half of participants in a Norwegian study were able to either partially or fully recover from schizophrenia.

The study focused on young people who were given four years of treatment for their disorder. About 55 percent of them were able to recover and even 10 percent of those that were fully recovered no longer need medication. The results reveal much greater potential for recovery than previous research had shown which gives hope to patients with schizophrenia and their loved ones.

Researchers followed the progress of 30 young adults who were recently hospitalized or were starting outpatient treatment for schizophrenia. All of the patients had serious delusions and hallucinations that impacted their ability to function. Each patient received information about their diagnosis and what they could do to help manage the disorder during treatment.

The patients also participated in group discussions and received regular sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy to help them address their delusions and other symptoms. Most patients took antipsychotic medication to ease their symptoms during treatment and follow-up. They also received help finding a vocation through supported work and then regular employment which was part of the criteria for full recovery.

Those who held regular employment and reduced many of their symptoms often showed stronger signs of resilience. The results reveal the possibilities for patients with schizophrenia to recover if they receive treatment early and exhibit motivation and strength to keep working toward better health.

Delusions of Grandeur

Posted on: May 23rd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Delusions of Grandeur

There are many different mental health conditions that can cause an individual to experience delusions of grandeur. Someone who has a false belief that they possess superior qualities such as genius, fame, omnipotence or wealth can be said to have delusions of grandeur and it may cause them to behave abnormally. A person with delusions of grandeur will firmly believe that they have some great, unrecognized talent or insight in spite of no evidence that this is the case.

Delusions of grandeur can often occur in illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, dementia and narcissistic personality disorder. These illnesses can cause the individual to have a rigid and fixed belief in their abilities and importance, even sometimes believing that they have a special relationship with a prominent person such as the president. These delusions can also include religious tones such as believing that they have received a special message from God.

In many cases delusions of grandeur can be exacerbated by alcohol or drug use when the individual has a particular mental illness. Their substance abuse can intensify delusions or even cause them to develop in some cases. Certain drugs such as PCP or amphetamines can put people at even greater risk of developing delusions of grandeur or worsening them.

People with delusions of grandeur can have serious issues in their personal and professional lives if their beliefs begin to interfere with reality. Their belief in their own superiority can lead to conflict and cause problems at work and in relationships. It can even put their lives in danger at times if they believe that they possess special powers or abilities such as being able to fly.

For someone with delusions of grandeur it is important to get a proper diagnosis for their mental illness and treatment that addresses their delusional thinking and other symptoms.

I’m not Schizophrenic I am Schizoaffective

Posted on: May 12th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Schizophrenic or Schizoaffective?

I’m not Schizophrenic I am Schizoaffective

Schizophrenic or Schizoaffective? What do you think? Although such disorder is a mental illness that is closely related to schizophrenia, the two problems are distinctly different diagnoses. Many people mistakenly believe that schizoaffective disorder is a subtype of schizophrenia but this is not the case. They are both separate mental disorders that have their own unique set of symptoms.

People who are schizoaffective often receive a diagnosis of schizophrenia in the early stages of their illness because the two problems are so frequently confused. There are many similarities between the two illnesses which can cause some physicians and psychiatrists to misdiagnose their patients. However, there are also significant differences that make it possible to categorize one separately from the other.

Even though schizophrenia is the more well-known disorder that is often considered very severe, the truth is that schizoaffective disorder is much more complex and difficult to diagnose and treat. A diagnosis of the schizoaffective disorder can be problematic because it combines characteristics of different disorders. However, with the right treatment it is still possible for a schizoaffective individual to improve their condition and function as well as they can.

What is Schizoaffective Disorder?

Someone who is schizoaffective is experience a hybrid of different conditions that combines characteristics of schizophrenia and certain mood disorders such as bipolar disorder and depression. The fact that it is a hybrid condition affecting a person’s mood is what sets it apart from schizophrenia which is related to thoughts and behavior but not directly to a person’s mood. Schizoaffective disorder blends different health conditions and affects a person completely including their thoughts, feelings, behavior and mood.

One way to understand how schizoaffective disorder combines different characteristics of disorders is to think of it as a part of a spectrum. On one end of the spectrum would be schizophrenia and on the other would be a mood disorder such as bipolar disorder. Schizoaffective disorder would fall somewhere in the middle of these two illnesses.

People with such disorder can often exhibit symptoms that are experienced by people with bipolar disorder including extreme mood swings. They will feel the high of mania and the low of depression through different phases of their life in a similar way to bipolar disorder. However, a schizoaffective person will also experience symptoms normally associated with schizophrenia such as hallucinations and delusions.

Understanding the Symptoms of this Disorder

A schizoaffective person, may suffer unnecessarily if they receive an inaccurate diagnosis of either schizophrenia or a mood disorder. They need treatment for all of their symptoms rather than one aspect of them so it is important that they have a correct diagnosis in order to improve. These are some of the signs and symptoms of this disorder:

  • Auditory hallucinations in the form of voices that may be hostile or accusatory
  • Delusions or false, irrational beliefs that cause fear, paranoia and mistrust of others
  • Disorganized thinking as exhibited by thought or speech patterns that lack coherence
  • Thought blocking where the mind suddenly goes blank
  • Excessive, repetitive or agitated body movements that have no obvious purpose

As well as manic symptoms such as:

  • talking too fast
  • Racing thoughts
  • Difficulty thinking and concentrating
  • Inflated self-esteem and delusions of grandeur

They might also have depressive symptoms including:

  • Low energy and motivation
  • Appetite and weight changes
  • Talking too much or too little
  • Trouble completing projects
  • Apathy about school, work or relationships
  • Feelings of hopelessness or thoughts of suicide

Diagnosing Schizoaffective

Because there are many different sets of symptoms and one individual may not exhibit all of them it can be very complex to recognize and diagnose schizoaffective disorder. It requires more extensive exploration of a patient’s medical and psychological background. Psychiatrists must be cautious about diagnosing someone as schizoaffective and have enough expertise in order to make an official diagnosis.

In order for someone to receive a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder they will need to have experienced psychotic episodes for at least a month that involved delusions, hallucinations or disorganized thinking. They will also need to have a mood disorder that is dominant more than half of the time. If either mania or depression have been present for an extended period of time along with psychotic episodes then they will most likely be diagnosed as schizoaffective.

Although schizoaffective disorder is complex, like most mental illnesses it is treatable with the help of medication and psychotherapy. Antipsychotics can be helpful for any schizophrenic symptoms and antidepressants or mood stabilizers can help treat a mood disorder. Individual psychotherapy along with group therapy can be very beneficial to help treat the sources of their symptoms.

An inpatient treatment program for a period of time can be very helpful in allowing a person, to learn to manage their disorder and minimize their symptoms. If you think you or someone you love might have this disorder then contact a mental health professional for assistance.