Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘anxiety’

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

Posted on: September 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

People suffering from anxiety are 2 to 3 times more likely to struggle with addiction. Since 18% of the American population is suffering from anxiety, it’s not surprising that many individuals in drug rehab have a co-occurring anxiety disorder. For this reason, drug rehab centers treat anxiety (and other mental illnesses) concurrently with the substance use disorder.

Here is what you need to know about the link between anxiety and substance use, and how it is treated in rehab centers.

The Link Between Anxiety and Substance Use

There are a number of reasons people suffering from anxiety start using substances. For people suffering from social anxiety disorder, alcohol and other substances give them confidence and lower their inhibitions. They may start using the substance in group settings or when they are afraid they won’t be able to speak to someone important.

In contrast, many people suffering from various forms of anxiety use drugs and alcohol to turn off their mind’s chatter. This is especially true for people suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who struggle to find ways to quiet obsessive thoughts. However, it is often also the case for people with other forms of anxiety.

Since anxiety can lead to insomnia, as the individual struggles to shut down their mind despite being exhausted, some sufferers turn to drugs or alcohol to help get to sleep.

There are many avenues which lead people suffering from anxiety to substance abuse. How is anxiety treated in drug rehab centers?

Dual-Diagnosis

All good rehab centers take a dual-diagnosis approach to recovery. This means that they treat any co-occurring mental illnesses concurrently with the substance use disorder. As with anxiety, many other mental illnesses correlate with substance abuse, and in order to fully recover, patients need to treat both.

Therefore, anxiety treatment in a drug rehab center is given high priority. On some occasions, addiction treatment coincides with proven anxiety treatments.

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

Many common treatments for substance use disorder intersect with treatments for anxiety. Group therapy is a fundamental part of drug rehab. It gives residents the opportunity to voice their issues, rather than obsessing over them internally. The sense of community helps individuals know they are not alone, and the support reassures them.

Mindfulness training is also useful for both addiction and anxiety. Mindfulness techniques help individuals quiet their minds, letting the troubling thoughts come and go rather than holding onto them or trying in vain to get rid of them.

Individual Therapy

While every patient in a rehab center will receive individual therapy, it provides those suffering with anxiety to confront the problem head-on. In individual therapy, patients can focus on their own personal issues and not just their substance use. They work with the therapist to understand where their anxiety originated and identify the narratives that drive the anxiety. With this understanding, they can begin changing those narratives in a significant, paradigmatic way.

In addition, individual therapy gives the person the chance to learn specific techniques to deal with anxiety. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is perhaps the most popular therapy used for treating anxiety in particular. In CBT, the individual learns to identify and challenge troubling thoughts. Often these thoughts are irrational, and challenging them brings this to light, helping the person let go of them. Even if the thoughts are rational, obsessing over them is often irrational and, with practice, the individual learns to let them go.

CBT provides a range of other techniques to manage anxiety. For example, some therapists recommend setting aside “worry time” to spend considering the anxious thoughts, while compartmentalizing them.

Medication

In many cases, psychiatrists will prescribe medication to help individuals manage their anxiety. Rehab centers have psychiatrists who specialize in dealing with addiction. This is important, considering many anti-anxiety medications are addictive. The benzodiazepine class in particular – including Xanax, Valium, Ativan, and other well-known tranquilizers – are known to build dependence.

Instead of prescribing these drugs, which are at best temporary solutions, psychiatrists in rehab centers will prescribe long-term alternatives. Seroquel can help with anxiety and depression, as well as facilitating better sleep. Antidepressants are proven to reduce anxiety. Your psychiatrist will have a wide range of knowledge about the best non-addictive chemical options to treat anxiety.

Occupational Therapy

The rehab center, or your individual counselor, may also provide occupational therapy. This is training that helps you in practical ways, such as creating structure, managing anxiety through day-to-day activities, practicing for job interviews, and much more.

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

Rehab centers place a high importance on treating anxiety and other mental illnesses, as they can lead to rehab. If an individual’s drug use began as a way to deal with anxiety, they need to find adaptive ways of dealing with that anxiety, or drug use will be the most attractive option.

Anxiety disorders and substance use disorders are closely linked. Good drug rehab centers treat anxiety concurrently with addiction.

References:

  1.  Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (2016). Substance Use Disorders
  2. Franken, I. H. and Hendriks, V. M. (2001), Screening and Diagnosis of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Substance Abuse Patients. The American Journal on Addictions, 10: 30-39. doi:10.1080/105504901750160448

  3. Mancebo, M. C., Grant, J. E., Pinto, A., Eisen, J. L., & Rasmussen, S. A. (2009). Substance use disorders in an obsessive compulsive disorder clinical sample. Journal of anxiety disorders, 23(4), 429–435. doi:10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.08.008

  4. Blobaum P. M. (2013). Mapping the literature of addictions treatment. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 101(2), 101–109. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.101.2.005

  5. Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2017). Group Therapy for Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of Clinician Practices. Journal of groups in addiction & recovery, 12(4), 243–259. doi:10.1080/1556035X.2017.1348280

  6. Otte C. (2011). Cognitive behavioral therapy in anxiety disorders: current state of the evidence. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience, 13(4), 413–421

  7. Vasile, R. G., Bruce, S. E., Goisman, R. M., Pagano, M. and Keller, M. B. (2005), Results of a naturalistic longitudinal study of benzodiazepine and SSRI use in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. Depress. Anxiety, 22: 59-67. doi:10.1002/da.20089

How Anxiety and Alcohol are Linked

Posted on: August 14th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

 

People often associate alcohol with a feeling of relaxation, especially when it is used in a social setting or to unwind after work. However, that association can often become problematic especially for people that suffer from anxiety. There is a strong connection between chronic alcohol abuse and anxiety for many people in the U.S.

 

The tendency for people to drink in order to relax and celebrate can lead to the misconception that alcohol is a good cure for anxiety. People that feel anxious in social situations might end up drinking more or those who are unable to handle their stress might drink whenever they are tense. However, alcohol only provides short-term temporary relief from anxiety and over time can actually worsen anxious feelings when consumed regularly.

 

People with anxiety often feel restless, have difficulty focusing, experience a lot of muscle tension and have trouble sleeping. Alcohol can initially make them feel more relaxed  because it has a sedative effect but developing a tolerance and going through withdrawal can lead to very severe symptoms of anxiety and depression. In many cases, frequent alcohol abuse can actually lead to an anxiety disorder.

 

Issues like social anxiety disorder, panic disorder and other anxiety illnesses are commonly linked with alcohol abuse. About 20 percent of people with social anxiety disorder suffer from some type of alcohol dependence. People with social anxiety use alcohol as a way to feel more comfortable in social situations but studies show that alcohol can increase anxiety within just a few hours of consuming it.

 

People with anxiety are more vulnerable to alcohol problems and people that drink are more susceptible to the development of anxiety. Those with co-occurring disorders will need to get treatment for both their anxiety and addiction in order to recover their mental health.

 

References

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/common-comorbidities-substance-use-disorders/why-there-comorbidity-between-substance-use-disorders-mental-illnesses

Giving Up Coffee to Treat Anxiety

Posted on: February 6th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Giving Up Coffee to Treat Anxiety

Most people know that caffeine is not good for your health but evidence suggests that it can even worsen symptoms of anxiety. People rely on coffee as a stimulant to keep them awake and focused but along with those affects come jitteriness, tension, increased heart rate and other symptoms. These physical effects very closely resemble some of the symptoms associated with anxiety.

Even for people who develop a tolerance to caffeine, the drug will always contribute to anxiety symptoms as a person is never completely tolerant to its effects. Higher doses above 250 milligrams are more likely to trigger anxiety and other side effects such as insomnia and cardiac arrhythmia. People with existing issues with anxiety tend to be more sensitive to the effects of caffeine.

For someone suffering from anxiety who is particularly vulnerable to the effects of caffeine it may be helpful for them to quit or at least cut down on their intake. Gradually cutting back by switching to tea or decaf can be a good way to reduce the overall amount of caffeine that you drink. Being aware of the caffeine content of certain drinks and keeping your intake below 250 milligrams can be a helpful start.

Quitting caffeine completely can be especially beneficial for anxiety but you are likely to go through some withdrawal symptoms if you are a regular coffee drinker. Things like headaches, fatigue, difficulty concentrating and even depression can result from caffeine withdrawal. Cutting back slowly can help you avoid withdrawal and you will start to see some of your anxiety symptoms reduced over time.

It can be helpful to make sure you get at least eight hours of sleep every night and try to boost energy naturally by eating healthy foods and exercising regularly. Staying healthy can reduce your need for caffeine and make it easier to quit completely.

 

Stopping Your Downward Spiral

Posted on: January 29th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Stopping Your Downward Spiral

For people that struggle with mental health issues, and even people who are simply dealing with a lot of stress they might be familiar with the downward spiral. When you start to have negative thoughts and emotions that start small, they can begin to spiral into bigger and bigger problems in your mind. This is a common issue for people with anxiety and depression who allow their negativity to spiral out of control.

The subconscious mind can cause a downward spiral because of deeper wounds and insecurities that become triggered by something in the present. In order to cope with the tendency to spiral it is helpful to learn to identify triggers and recognize the beginning of feelings of shame as soon as possible. When feelings of shame come up you can try to give yourself compassion and reassurance instead of continuing the cycle of shame and guilt.

If you are able to stop some of your negative thoughts and feelings you can try to reclaim your power and get back on a more positive path. You can start to assess the situation and regain your sense of mental balance by recognizing which of your feelings are legitimate reactions in that moment. If you are really struggling to get back on track then it might be a good idea to call a friend or reach out for help from someone that you trust.

The most important way to stop a downward spiral is to try to focus on positive things. Feelings of gratitude for even the most basic things that you have in your life – your health, your family etc can all generate a more positive mindset. Trying to find something positive to keep you grounded can prevent a downward spiral from progressing and get you back on track quickly.

When Imposter Syndrome Leads You to Depression

Posted on: January 26th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

When Imposter Syndrome Leads You to Depression

A form of anxiety known as “imposter syndrome” is something that affects many high achieving people. Essentially, imposter syndrome is a deep feeling that a person is not as competent as others perceive them to be. They may feel that they are not as smart, talented or capable as others believe even though they might have achieved a certain level of success.

Beneath imposter syndrome is a sense of anxiety and perfectionism that causes the person to feel like a phony or a fraud. They may be in a social situation and fear that the other person will find out that they are socially awkward or inept. They might be in a performance situation and feel that they don’t belong there because they aren’t talented or skilled enough.

These “imposter” feelings can be strong linked to anxiety and depression as the individual never really feels able to accept themselves as worthy. Feeling like an imposter can lead to hopelessness, worry, the desire to isolate themselves and other issues. They may spiral into a serious depression because they feel they can’t reach the level of competence that they want to have.

In some cases, imposter syndrome can fuel feelings of motivation to achieve but for others it may lead to depression and even giving up. People who are struggling with imposter syndrome and depression can move past these problems by talking to a therapist and getting help. Opening up about these feelings can help relieve some of the pressure that someone with this issue often puts on themselves.

In therapy, someone with imposter syndrome can learn to develop a more accurate view of themselves and their abilities and accomplishments. They can learn to stop comparing themselves to others and accept that they provide value to people by being who they are.