Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

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191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘anxiety’

Living With Anxiety

Posted on: December 9th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Living With Anxiety

Anxiety rates have skyrocketed, and more people have been diagnosed with different forms of anxiety disorders from generalized anxiety disorder to OCD and PTSD. Although there is technically no “cure” for anxiety, there is what’s understood as permanent recovery.  Fortunately, treatment methods have come a long way that can greatly reduce symptoms and everyday struggles. Simple breathing exercises to cutting edge cognitive behavioral therapy and exposure therapy are all available to treat anxiety.

It’s important to mention, as human, a certain level of anxiety is necessary. Anxiety makes us alert, we need our anxiety to function in life and our body relies on its signals to warn of potential danger. An anxiety disorder is when these signals are firing without the presence of danger. Those who’s anxiety symptoms are debilitating and negatively affecting their daily life need professional treatment. Psychiatrists can prescribe anxiety medication and alternative therapies to patients to help them manage symptoms and live fulfilling lives as soon as they wake up.

The idea is that anxiety is something that is managed day in and day out. Besides a treatment program there are little things one can make sure implement into their schedule to manage their anxiety.

For those living with anxiety, an uninterrupted, restful night of sleep can set the tone for the day ahead.  A purposeful morning routine is crucial as well to set into motion a productive day. Professionals advise against morning coffee for those prone to caffeine-induced anxiety. Other activities that should be avoided immediately after waking up include scrolling through social media and news feed. Those living with anxiety can benefit from a morning meditation session, a healthy breakfast or light exercise. Starting the day calm, centered and connected with yourself before factors beyond your control come into play is essential.

One of the most common factors that contribute to anxiety rates are a person’s work life. If job stress is a big source of anxiety, consider finding a job that respects your mental health. More companies are now accommodating to their employee’s mental health and offer benefits like mental health days, wellness programs, healthy snack options, meditations rooms, and so much more. If things get overwhelming it’s important take a break and step away. Being honest with your employer about your workload and capabilities is important.

Having hobbies or participating in activities outside of work are highly recommend. Besides exercise, things like book clubs, gardening, making music or volunteer work can help ease anxiety. Exercise is highly recommend for anxiety because of the endorphins produced, stress relief and improved sleep, however finding an activity you are personally comfortable with is the key.  Group activities are also valuable in maintaining social connections. Participating in support groups are important but if that is not available, making time for family members and friends is irreplaceable.

Again, anxiety disorders should be treated by a professional. The helpful everyday tips and suggestions are meant to supplement individualized treatment plan.

 

References:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/generalized-anxiety-disorder/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20361045

https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/how-to-press-acupressure-points-for-anxiety

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323456.php

 

Mental Health and Money Disorders

Posted on: November 18th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Mental Health and Money Disorders

From the rising cost of living to student loan, Americans are in debt and have dismal savings account. According to Psychology Today “3 out of 4 Americans identified money as the number one source of stress in their lives.” Financial problems are so widespread that people are now using the term “money disorders” to describe their condition.

What Is A Money Disorder?

Money disorders are defined as repetitive destructive financial behaviors. These money disorders can further develop into mental health disorders like depression, anxiety and can even result in substance abuse. On the other hand, health care and finance professionals also say that mental health disorders often result in negative financial complications.

It is not unusual for people to develop their money disorder from their childhood. If someone grew up in poverty, financial instability or witnessed their parents stress or argue about money, they may internalize those feelings into adulthood. Even those that grew up more or less wealthy and witnessed their parents spend frivolously can also experience an affected outlook on their spending behaviors.

Types of Money Disorders

Money disorders can manifest in two main ways. Some people can be described as money avoidant and others as money worshipping. Those that are money avoidant have a general uneasiness about money all the time. They are constantly worried they will not have enough money and begin to hoard their belongings or become a workaholic. Other forms of money avoidance include financial denial, financial rejection underspending and excessive risk aversion. In short, money makes them anxious.

Those that are money worshipping are characterized by gambling, compulsive buying and overspending. Acquiring money and spending money makes these people feel good in that they ignore any negative repercussions that may result in their spending.

Stress and Depression

Due to the emotional issues that accompany these behaviors, financial insecurity wreaks havoc on our mental health. Unfortunately, debt and stress go hand in hand and because debt triggers stress, the brains is in constant panic mode making a person more susceptible to poor mental health. When you’re constantly stressed about money other things like health, family and other important things get neglected. Constant money related stress can lead a person to feel hopeless and have low self-esteem. According to debt.org those with higher levels of unemployment were more likely to purchase over-the-counter pain killers.

Those that have mental health issues like Bipolar Disorder, PTSD and Compulsive Shopping Disorder can also engage in reckless spending while they are in a manic phase. Those suffering with depression may feel spending money can fix their mood short term. Also, people generally spend more money when they feel unwell in hopes their purchases will make them feel better.

Treatment

Treatment and counseling are available for people who feel they need help managing their money disorders. Others are trying to push for banks to implement mental-health options or certain barriers for those prone to impulsively mismanage their money. Support groups and other resources are available for those looking for guidance.

References:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/mind-over-money/201001/do-you-have-money-disorder

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/26/money-disorders-and-debt-can-come-from-anxiety-depression-or-trauma.html

https://www.bustle.com/p/15-fascinating-signs-you-may-have-a-money-disorder-15943988

https://globalnews.ca/news/6048717/money-disorder/

https://www.debt.org/advice/emotional-effects/

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/4w5vp9/why-your-mental-health-is-making-you-poor

 

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

Posted on: September 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

People suffering from anxiety are 2 to 3 times more likely to struggle with addiction. Since 18% of the American population is suffering from anxiety, it’s not surprising that many individuals in drug rehab have a co-occurring anxiety disorder. For this reason, drug rehab centers treat anxiety (and other mental illnesses) concurrently with the substance use disorder.

Here is what you need to know about the link between anxiety and substance use, and how it is treated in rehab centers.

The Link Between Anxiety and Substance Use

There are a number of reasons people suffering from anxiety start using substances. For people suffering from social anxiety disorder, alcohol and other substances give them confidence and lower their inhibitions. They may start using the substance in group settings or when they are afraid they won’t be able to speak to someone important.

In contrast, many people suffering from various forms of anxiety use drugs and alcohol to turn off their mind’s chatter. This is especially true for people suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who struggle to find ways to quiet obsessive thoughts. However, it is often also the case for people with other forms of anxiety.

Since anxiety can lead to insomnia, as the individual struggles to shut down their mind despite being exhausted, some sufferers turn to drugs or alcohol to help get to sleep.

There are many avenues which lead people suffering from anxiety to substance abuse. How is anxiety treated in drug rehab centers?

Dual-Diagnosis

All good rehab centers take a dual-diagnosis approach to recovery. This means that they treat any co-occurring mental illnesses concurrently with the substance use disorder. As with anxiety, many other mental illnesses correlate with substance abuse, and in order to fully recover, patients need to treat both.

Therefore, anxiety treatment in a drug rehab center is given high priority. On some occasions, addiction treatment coincides with proven anxiety treatments.

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

Many common treatments for substance use disorder intersect with treatments for anxiety. Group therapy is a fundamental part of drug rehab. It gives residents the opportunity to voice their issues, rather than obsessing over them internally. The sense of community helps individuals know they are not alone, and the support reassures them.

Mindfulness training is also useful for both addiction and anxiety. Mindfulness techniques help individuals quiet their minds, letting the troubling thoughts come and go rather than holding onto them or trying in vain to get rid of them.

Individual Therapy

While every patient in a rehab center will receive individual therapy, it provides those suffering with anxiety to confront the problem head-on. In individual therapy, patients can focus on their own personal issues and not just their substance use. They work with the therapist to understand where their anxiety originated and identify the narratives that drive the anxiety. With this understanding, they can begin changing those narratives in a significant, paradigmatic way.

In addition, individual therapy gives the person the chance to learn specific techniques to deal with anxiety. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is perhaps the most popular therapy used for treating anxiety in particular. In CBT, the individual learns to identify and challenge troubling thoughts. Often these thoughts are irrational, and challenging them brings this to light, helping the person let go of them. Even if the thoughts are rational, obsessing over them is often irrational and, with practice, the individual learns to let them go.

CBT provides a range of other techniques to manage anxiety. For example, some therapists recommend setting aside “worry time” to spend considering the anxious thoughts, while compartmentalizing them.

Medication

In many cases, psychiatrists will prescribe medication to help individuals manage their anxiety. Rehab centers have psychiatrists who specialize in dealing with addiction. This is important, considering many anti-anxiety medications are addictive. The benzodiazepine class in particular – including Xanax, Valium, Ativan, and other well-known tranquilizers – are known to build dependence.

Instead of prescribing these drugs, which are at best temporary solutions, psychiatrists in rehab centers will prescribe long-term alternatives. Seroquel can help with anxiety and depression, as well as facilitating better sleep. Antidepressants are proven to reduce anxiety. Your psychiatrist will have a wide range of knowledge about the best non-addictive chemical options to treat anxiety.

Occupational Therapy

The rehab center, or your individual counselor, may also provide occupational therapy. This is training that helps you in practical ways, such as creating structure, managing anxiety through day-to-day activities, practicing for job interviews, and much more.

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

Rehab centers place a high importance on treating anxiety and other mental illnesses, as they can lead to rehab. If an individual’s drug use began as a way to deal with anxiety, they need to find adaptive ways of dealing with that anxiety, or drug use will be the most attractive option.

Anxiety disorders and substance use disorders are closely linked. Good drug rehab centers treat anxiety concurrently with addiction.

References:

  1.  Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (2016). Substance Use Disorders
  2. Franken, I. H. and Hendriks, V. M. (2001), Screening and Diagnosis of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Substance Abuse Patients. The American Journal on Addictions, 10: 30-39. doi:10.1080/105504901750160448

  3. Mancebo, M. C., Grant, J. E., Pinto, A., Eisen, J. L., & Rasmussen, S. A. (2009). Substance use disorders in an obsessive compulsive disorder clinical sample. Journal of anxiety disorders, 23(4), 429–435. doi:10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.08.008

  4. Blobaum P. M. (2013). Mapping the literature of addictions treatment. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 101(2), 101–109. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.101.2.005

  5. Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2017). Group Therapy for Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of Clinician Practices. Journal of groups in addiction & recovery, 12(4), 243–259. doi:10.1080/1556035X.2017.1348280

  6. Otte C. (2011). Cognitive behavioral therapy in anxiety disorders: current state of the evidence. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience, 13(4), 413–421

  7. Vasile, R. G., Bruce, S. E., Goisman, R. M., Pagano, M. and Keller, M. B. (2005), Results of a naturalistic longitudinal study of benzodiazepine and SSRI use in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. Depress. Anxiety, 22: 59-67. doi:10.1002/da.20089

How Anxiety and Alcohol are Linked

Posted on: August 14th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Living With Anxiety

 

People often associate alcohol with a feeling of relaxation, especially when it is used in a social setting or to unwind after work. However, that association can often become problematic especially for people that suffer from anxiety. There is a strong connection between chronic alcohol abuse and anxiety for many people in the U.S.

 

The tendency for people to drink in order to relax and celebrate can lead to the misconception that alcohol is a good cure for anxiety. People that feel anxious in social situations might end up drinking more or those who are unable to handle their stress might drink whenever they are tense. However, alcohol only provides short-term temporary relief from anxiety and over time can actually worsen anxious feelings when consumed regularly.

 

People with anxiety often feel restless, have difficulty focusing, experience a lot of muscle tension and have trouble sleeping. Alcohol can initially make them feel more relaxed  because it has a sedative effect but developing a tolerance and going through withdrawal can lead to very severe symptoms of anxiety and depression. In many cases, frequent alcohol abuse can actually lead to an anxiety disorder.

 

Issues like social anxiety disorder, panic disorder and other anxiety illnesses are commonly linked with alcohol abuse. About 20 percent of people with social anxiety disorder suffer from some type of alcohol dependence. People with social anxiety use alcohol as a way to feel more comfortable in social situations but studies show that alcohol can increase anxiety within just a few hours of consuming it.

 

People with anxiety are more vulnerable to alcohol problems and people that drink are more susceptible to the development of anxiety. Those with co-occurring disorders will need to get treatment for both their anxiety and addiction in order to recover their mental health.

 

References

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/common-comorbidities-substance-use-disorders/why-there-comorbidity-between-substance-use-disorders-mental-illnesses

Giving Up Coffee to Treat Anxiety

Posted on: February 6th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Giving Up Coffee to Treat Anxiety

Most people know that caffeine is not good for your health but evidence suggests that it can even worsen symptoms of anxiety. People rely on coffee as a stimulant to keep them awake and focused but along with those affects come jitteriness, tension, increased heart rate and other symptoms. These physical effects very closely resemble some of the symptoms associated with anxiety.

Even for people who develop a tolerance to caffeine, the drug will always contribute to anxiety symptoms as a person is never completely tolerant to its effects. Higher doses above 250 milligrams are more likely to trigger anxiety and other side effects such as insomnia and cardiac arrhythmia. People with existing issues with anxiety tend to be more sensitive to the effects of caffeine.

For someone suffering from anxiety who is particularly vulnerable to the effects of caffeine it may be helpful for them to quit or at least cut down on their intake. Gradually cutting back by switching to tea or decaf can be a good way to reduce the overall amount of caffeine that you drink. Being aware of the caffeine content of certain drinks and keeping your intake below 250 milligrams can be a helpful start.

Quitting caffeine completely can be especially beneficial for anxiety but you are likely to go through some withdrawal symptoms if you are a regular coffee drinker. Things like headaches, fatigue, difficulty concentrating and even depression can result from caffeine withdrawal. Cutting back slowly can help you avoid withdrawal and you will start to see some of your anxiety symptoms reduced over time.

It can be helpful to make sure you get at least eight hours of sleep every night and try to boost energy naturally by eating healthy foods and exercising regularly. Staying healthy can reduce your need for caffeine and make it easier to quit completely.