Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Archive for November, 2018

What are Mental Health Triggers?

Posted on: November 25th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

What are Mental Health Triggers?

Someone who suffers from a mental illness may not always experience their symptoms except in certain circumstances. People with mental health problems often have specific triggers that produce their symptoms or worsen them. It is normal for people to react to triggers but it is important to get help and support before the triggers lead to a downward spiral or a mental health episode.

Patients receiving treatment for a mental illness such as anxiety, depression or bipolar disorder will all have certain mental health triggers. During treatment they will need to learn to identify their own personal triggers so that they can prevent an episode or have a plan in place if symptoms do occur. Becoming familiar with triggers can make them more manageable so that they don’t control your mental well being when they come up.

Triggers can differ between each individual but some common triggers include stress, frightening news events, break ups with a significant other, family conflict, anniversary dates of a trauma, financial problems, being judged or teased, spending too much time alone and many others. When someone who has a mental illness experiences one of these triggers they may suddenly become very depressed or anxious and find that they are having trouble coping with their normal daily tasks.

It is crucial to develop a plan for how to deal with these kinds of triggers so that they don’t worsen symptoms too severely. Patients can make a list of actions or activities that help them minimize the effects of triggers such as going for a walk, talking to a friend, practicing relaxation exercises, or writing in a journal. As long as you know certain tactics that can help alleviate some of your symptoms quickly, you can prevent triggers from disrupting your normal routine.

It Gets Better

Posted on: November 22nd, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

It Gets Better

Even though facing an addiction may seem hopeless, there are many opportunities to work toward a better future. Only people who have experienced addiction firsthand will understand the destructive toll it takes on your life. When you have hit rock bottom it can be difficult to see any light at the end of the tunnel but for most people who manage to get help, things will ultimately get better.

The image surrounding addiction, especially in Hollywood, is often of the addict who can’t escape their own self-destructive tendencies and they are never able to recover. Recent films like “A Star is Born” show a main character who is destroyed by his addiction and never gets the opportunity to try to fully live sober. Even though these kinds of tragedies do occur, the majority of people who receive treatment for addiction are able to survive and lead healthy lives.

One of the biggest issues with addiction is the significant stigma that people experience with the disease. In that sense it is different than any other disease that has its normal ups and downs. When people relapse and their disease worsens temporarily, they are judged very harshly by society in a way that can jeopardize their ability to recover.

Even when someone relapses, if they are able to get the support that they need it doesn’t mean that they have failed in their recovery. As with any disease, continuing treatment can mean that it gets easier every time as they work toward permanent sobriety. Going back to treatment after a relapse is often a normal part of the process.

Although addiction is sometimes stigmatized and portrayed harshly in the media, most people find that they can become healthy and sober with the right treatment and support from peers, friends and family.

Circadian Rhythm Disturbances Effect on Mental Health

Posted on: November 19th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Circadian Rhythm Disturbances Effect on Mental Health

Sleep habits and mental health are often closely connected in a number of different ways. People that have mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder are well-known to struggle with get a regular amount of sleep. The lack of sleep that they experience can often worsen symptoms and cause a vicious cycle of poor mental and physical health.

Studies have shown that patients with bipolar disorder tend to have more problems with circadian rhythm disturbances than healthier individuals. They stay up later at night, wake up in the middle of the night and often suffer from general issues of insomnia. These sleep disturbances can have a devastating effect on mental health and are even linked to higher rates of suicide.

Sleep problems influence a person’s mental health and their state of mental health can also impact their ability to sleep. Since these two problems are intertwined, it is necessary to treat both issues simultaneously so that they can improve the other. A patient with bipolar disorder who receives medication and psychotherapy may over time find it easier to sleep and in turn better sleep habits will improve their symptoms.

There are many techniques that can help repair a person’s circadian rhythm so that they are able to sleep regular hours without any disturbances. Strategies such as exercising regularly, spending time in the sun, improving diet and reducing stress can all have a positive impact on circadian rhythm. Supplements like melatonin can also be useful in balancing the body’s hormones that promote better sleep.

For better sleep habits and good mental health overall it is beneficial to go to sleep and wake up around the same time every day. Avoid staying up too late at night as it can disturb normal sleep patterns. Getting eight straight hours every night is crucial for mental health and overall wellbeing.

 

Young Lawyers Alcohol Abuse

Posted on: November 15th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Young Lawyers Alcohol Abuse

There is a common stereotype in movies and tv shows depicting the alcoholic lawyer who reaches for the bottle due to the stress of his job. Unfortunately, there is some truth to this stereotype as studies show lawyers are significantly more prone to alcoholism than the general population. As many as 36.6 of lawyers in one study had behaviors showing exhibiting issues of  problem drinking.

Surprisingly, this problem is only progressing further with the younger millennial generation of lawyers practicing now. The current generation in their 20s and early 30s tend to have more serious drinking habits due to financial stress, the high cost of living, and student loan debt. Young lawyers such as junior associates tend to drink the most because of these generational problems coupled with a highly stressful job.

Lawyers have demanding careers with long hours and frequently low professional satisfaction. They also have higher rates of mental health problems including depression and anxiety and often turn to alcohol to self-medicate. Alcohol becomes their solution to cope with the many issues that they face because of money, stress and very little free time.

The pattern of drinking frequently begins in law school when students party as a way to alleviate the stress of studying. When they take on full time jobs as lawyers, alcohol can take on a different role of calming their anxiety. Many will end a difficult day by going to happy hour with coworkers, as drinking often become part of the work culture in the legal profession.

Drinking may be thought to temporarily relieve stress for people with stressful jobs but ultimately it causes more psychological and behavioral issues that could endanger their career. Lawyers that abuse alcohol are likely to see it begin to affect their ability to work over time. Young lawyers with long term alcohol abuse problems need to address their issues with treatment and recovery.

Parenting an Adult Addict

Posted on: November 14th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Parenting an Adult Addict

The responsibility of being a parent may never completely end, even after children reach adulthood and leave home to lead their own lives. Being a parent means always trying to lead your son or daughter in the right direction especially when they are making very dangerous or unhealthy choices. When your adult child develops an addiction, it is often your responsibility as well as your desire as a parent to try to help them.

Parenting an adult addict can be difficult because you no longer can control their actions or tell them what to do. Some parents may worry too much for their child’s wellbeing and end up enabling them by getting them out of financial problems caused by their addiction. As a parent you need to learn the lines between stepping to help them and enabling them to continue their addictive behavior.

One problem that parents might experience is the feeling of guilt that can go along with having a child who is an addict. Their child might blame them for what they have become and the parent might feel ashamed of mistakes they made while raising them. It is important to understand that once a child reaches adulthood, their decisions are their own and it is not your fault that they have an addiction.

As a parent you need to avoid enabling your child but also be able to offer them love and support while encouraging them to get help. If possible, stage an intervention with other family members and loved ones who are concerned about their addiction. You need to try your best to still remain in their life but also protect yourself and others in the family from their misdeeds.

Having a child who is an addict is never easy, no matter what their age but with the right approach you can help motivate them to become sober.