Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘anxiety treatment’

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

Posted on: September 16th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Anxiety Treatment During Inpatient Drug Rehab

People suffering from anxiety are 2 to 3 times more likely to struggle with addiction. Since 18% of the American population is suffering from anxiety, it’s not surprising that many individuals in drug rehab have a co-occurring anxiety disorder. For this reason, drug rehab centers treat anxiety (and other mental illnesses) concurrently with the substance use disorder.

Here is what you need to know about the link between anxiety and substance use, and how it is treated in rehab centers.

The Link Between Anxiety and Substance Use

There are a number of reasons people suffering from anxiety start using substances. For people suffering from social anxiety disorder, alcohol and other substances give them confidence and lower their inhibitions. They may start using the substance in group settings or when they are afraid they won’t be able to speak to someone important.

In contrast, many people suffering from various forms of anxiety use drugs and alcohol to turn off their mind’s chatter. This is especially true for people suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who struggle to find ways to quiet obsessive thoughts. However, it is often also the case for people with other forms of anxiety.

Since anxiety can lead to insomnia, as the individual struggles to shut down their mind despite being exhausted, some sufferers turn to drugs or alcohol to help get to sleep.

There are many avenues which lead people suffering from anxiety to substance abuse. How is anxiety treated in drug rehab centers?

Dual-Diagnosis

All good rehab centers take a dual-diagnosis approach to recovery. This means that they treat any co-occurring mental illnesses concurrently with the substance use disorder. As with anxiety, many other mental illnesses correlate with substance abuse, and in order to fully recover, patients need to treat both.

Therefore, anxiety treatment in a drug rehab center is given high priority. On some occasions, addiction treatment coincides with proven anxiety treatments.

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

When Anxiety and Addiction Treatment Intersect

Many common treatments for substance use disorder intersect with treatments for anxiety. Group therapy is a fundamental part of drug rehab. It gives residents the opportunity to voice their issues, rather than obsessing over them internally. The sense of community helps individuals know they are not alone, and the support reassures them.

Mindfulness training is also useful for both addiction and anxiety. Mindfulness techniques help individuals quiet their minds, letting the troubling thoughts come and go rather than holding onto them or trying in vain to get rid of them.

Individual Therapy

While every patient in a rehab center will receive individual therapy, it provides those suffering with anxiety to confront the problem head-on. In individual therapy, patients can focus on their own personal issues and not just their substance use. They work with the therapist to understand where their anxiety originated and identify the narratives that drive the anxiety. With this understanding, they can begin changing those narratives in a significant, paradigmatic way.

In addition, individual therapy gives the person the chance to learn specific techniques to deal with anxiety. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is perhaps the most popular therapy used for treating anxiety in particular. In CBT, the individual learns to identify and challenge troubling thoughts. Often these thoughts are irrational, and challenging them brings this to light, helping the person let go of them. Even if the thoughts are rational, obsessing over them is often irrational and, with practice, the individual learns to let them go.

CBT provides a range of other techniques to manage anxiety. For example, some therapists recommend setting aside “worry time” to spend considering the anxious thoughts, while compartmentalizing them.

Medication

In many cases, psychiatrists will prescribe medication to help individuals manage their anxiety. Rehab centers have psychiatrists who specialize in dealing with addiction. This is important, considering many anti-anxiety medications are addictive. The benzodiazepine class in particular – including Xanax, Valium, Ativan, and other well-known tranquilizers – are known to build dependence.

Instead of prescribing these drugs, which are at best temporary solutions, psychiatrists in rehab centers will prescribe long-term alternatives. Seroquel can help with anxiety and depression, as well as facilitating better sleep. Antidepressants are proven to reduce anxiety. Your psychiatrist will have a wide range of knowledge about the best non-addictive chemical options to treat anxiety.

Occupational Therapy

The rehab center, or your individual counselor, may also provide occupational therapy. This is training that helps you in practical ways, such as creating structure, managing anxiety through day-to-day activities, practicing for job interviews, and much more.

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

The Importance of Dual-Diagnosis Treatment

Rehab centers place a high importance on treating anxiety and other mental illnesses, as they can lead to rehab. If an individual’s drug use began as a way to deal with anxiety, they need to find adaptive ways of dealing with that anxiety, or drug use will be the most attractive option.

Anxiety disorders and substance use disorders are closely linked. Good drug rehab centers treat anxiety concurrently with addiction.

References:

  1.  Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (2016). Substance Use Disorders
  2. Franken, I. H. and Hendriks, V. M. (2001), Screening and Diagnosis of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Substance Abuse Patients. The American Journal on Addictions, 10: 30-39. doi:10.1080/105504901750160448

  3. Mancebo, M. C., Grant, J. E., Pinto, A., Eisen, J. L., & Rasmussen, S. A. (2009). Substance use disorders in an obsessive compulsive disorder clinical sample. Journal of anxiety disorders, 23(4), 429–435. doi:10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.08.008

  4. Blobaum P. M. (2013). Mapping the literature of addictions treatment. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 101(2), 101–109. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.101.2.005

  5. Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2017). Group Therapy for Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of Clinician Practices. Journal of groups in addiction & recovery, 12(4), 243–259. doi:10.1080/1556035X.2017.1348280

  6. Otte C. (2011). Cognitive behavioral therapy in anxiety disorders: current state of the evidence. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience, 13(4), 413–421

  7. Vasile, R. G., Bruce, S. E., Goisman, R. M., Pagano, M. and Keller, M. B. (2005), Results of a naturalistic longitudinal study of benzodiazepine and SSRI use in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. Depress. Anxiety, 22: 59-67. doi:10.1002/da.20089

Giving Up Coffee to Treat Anxiety

Posted on: February 6th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Giving Up Coffee to Treat Anxiety

Most people know that caffeine is not good for your health but evidence suggests that it can even worsen symptoms of anxiety. People rely on coffee as a stimulant to keep them awake and focused but along with those affects come jitteriness, tension, increased heart rate and other symptoms. These physical effects very closely resemble some of the symptoms associated with anxiety.

Even for people who develop a tolerance to caffeine, the drug will always contribute to anxiety symptoms as a person is never completely tolerant to its effects. Higher doses above 250 milligrams are more likely to trigger anxiety and other side effects such as insomnia and cardiac arrhythmia. People with existing issues with anxiety tend to be more sensitive to the effects of caffeine.

For someone suffering from anxiety who is particularly vulnerable to the effects of caffeine it may be helpful for them to quit or at least cut down on their intake. Gradually cutting back by switching to tea or decaf can be a good way to reduce the overall amount of caffeine that you drink. Being aware of the caffeine content of certain drinks and keeping your intake below 250 milligrams can be a helpful start.

Quitting caffeine completely can be especially beneficial for anxiety but you are likely to go through some withdrawal symptoms if you are a regular coffee drinker. Things like headaches, fatigue, difficulty concentrating and even depression can result from caffeine withdrawal. Cutting back slowly can help you avoid withdrawal and you will start to see some of your anxiety symptoms reduced over time.

It can be helpful to make sure you get at least eight hours of sleep every night and try to boost energy naturally by eating healthy foods and exercising regularly. Staying healthy can reduce your need for caffeine and make it easier to quit completely.

 

Work-Induced Anxiety

Posted on: January 10th, 2019 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Work-Induced Anxiety

Some people suffer not necessarily from general anxiety but situational anxiety having to do with specific people, places or events. For many people, the workplace can induce intense feelings or worry and stress that they don’t experience anywhere else. Work anxiety can be difficult to overcome as we spend much of our lives at the workplace and need to do so in order to survive.

For some people who fear that their workplace is too anxiety-inducing it could be time to look into changing jobs. For those who aren’t willing or able to find another job, they can focus on different techniques to reduce their anxiety and make work more manageable. Feeling anxious at work can be normal but it doesn’t have to mean that you struggle every day with painful feelings at the office.

Mindfulness and self-awareness can both be effective techniques at dealing with anxiety. If you understand the root causes of your anxiety you can be aware of when triggers come up and learn to cope with them. Practicing mindfulness or relaxation methods can help minimize anxiety and allow you to work through anxious feelings.

Sometimes talking about your anxiety with someone can help ease your fears. You can talk with another coworker and see if they are experiencing the same feelings or a loved one who might have the same problems at their own workplace. Sharing your emotions with others and getting valuable feedback from can help reduce some of your anxiety.

If your anxiety about work is building up it may be a good idea to take some time off. Go on vacation for a few days or take a “mental health day” so that you can recharge. Everyone deserves a break from work stress especially if it is affecting your well being and causing too much anxiety.

 

Adjustment Disorder – Unable to Cope with Change

Posted on: October 20th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Adjustment Disorder

Stress and anxiety can lead to different kinds of illnesses with specific issues that need to be addressed. People that have a particularly hard time dealing with major changes such as moving to a new city, starting a new job, switching schools or breaking up with someone may have a problem known as adjustment disorder. Although anyone may feel stressed out about a big change in their life, people with this disorder have persistent symptoms of anxiety that occur after a major life event.

Adjustment disorder can begin once an unexpected change occurs that carries a strong emotional effect. If a child suddenly moves to a new city or state or their parents separate then that type of change can have a major impact on them. It is normal for kids or even adults to feel anxious and upset when they encounter change but if those persist for months and they have trouble moving on then they may have developed symptoms of adjustment disorder.

When someone develops adjustment disorder it means that their environmental stressors have exceeded their resources for coping. Some degree of anxiety is normal when you do something out of your comfort zone but when your reaction becomes disproportionate to the event taking place then it is considered a mental health issue. Adjustment disorder is similar to situational depression which leads to crying spells and waves of anger triggered by certain events.

If you have adjustment disorder it can make it difficult to adapt to new situations and learn to feel more comfortable with changes over time. You might find it difficult to bounce back from your feelings of depression and anxiety that were triggered by a new experience. Talking to a professional about your feelings can help you address the symptoms of adjustment disorder and learn strategies to cope with change.

Panic and Anxiety Hotlines

Posted on: September 6th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Panic and Anxiety Hotlines

People who experience anxiety often don’t know where to turn when they are having a particularly bad episode. They may feel too embarrassed or afraid to call friends or family to talk about what they are going through. Anxiety hotlines provide people with an opportunity to discuss personal problems with a compassionate person who is ready to help.

Hot lines are anonymous and confidential which can make it easier for people who are worried about being judged for their anxiety issues. They provide valuable resources for those who have panic attacks or are going through a crisis and simply need someone to talk to who will be understanding about their situation. Having someone simply listen and give you support can be an enormous comfort when you are in the midst of a serious episode.

There are a few different types of anxiety problems including panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety. Hot lines can offer advice and help for any of these issues no matter what your current level of anxiety may be. You can discuss your feelings of fear, shame, worry, pain or panic with a person who can help you feel more calm and relaxed.

One of the most important roles for hotlines is to allow people to feel that they are not alone in what they are dealing with. People with anxiety often feel isolated and unable to talk about their feelings for fear that others won’t understand. A hotline gives them a chance to open up and feel more connected to someone who truly cares.

Anxiety hotlines are convenient and helpful for anyone in crisis but if you have a long term anxiety disorder it might be beneficial to find a regular therapist. However, hotlines are a crucial support system that can be life-saving for people who are at their lowest point.