Gooden Center
A residential drug treatment center for men located in Pasadena, CA. The Gooden Center is a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP).

(626) 356-0078
191 North El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 US

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Posts Tagged ‘gender treatment’

Men and Women Experience Depression Differently

Posted on: April 10th, 2018 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Men and Women Experience Depression Differently

Depression has become a very common problem in the U.S. across all ages and demographics. Although women tend to have higher rates of depression, men also struggle with the issue in huge numbers. According to studies, in 2014 almost 16 million adults in the country went through a depressive episode.

Each person has their own unique experience with depression and certain factors can affect their symptoms. Gender can actually play an important role in how a person copes with depression and how the illness manifests itself. Women and men can share common signs and symptoms at times but they each experience depression differently.

Understanding how men and women differ in coping with depression can help inform their treatment and can allow them to find better recovery methods. It is important to know that everyone responds to treatment strategies differently, and women and men may find distinct things that make them feel better. How people related to depression can determine what type of treatment will be most effective.

Gender and Depression Symptoms

The unfortunate reality about gender and depression is that women carry most of the burden of the mental illness. Women actually have twice the risk of developing the condition than men even in different age groups. This is partially related to biological reasons such as hormones and genes that get disrupted when brain regions are developing in the womb.

Biological factors can create a higher vulnerability for depression and women tend to suffer from the problem more often than men. However, another factor that may explain at least partially why women have higher rates of depression is that they are better able to recognize these emotions in themselves. Men can generally be less in tune with their feelings and may not realize that they are experiencing symptoms of depression because they are hiding or denying their unhappiness.

Interestingly, although women have a higher risk for depression they don’t experience it as persistently as men. Women are more likely to have episodic depression that comes and goes while men experience persistent depression. Men are also more likely to suffer serious consequences from their depression such as issues with substance abuse and suicide.

Studies have shown that men and women even have different biological responses in their brain to words that are neutral, happy or sad. The parts of the brain that are linked to depression respond different in person’s brand based on their gender. Certain brain patterns showed that women might respond to more positive stimuli in easing their depression whereas men might need a different approach.                             

Treating Depression for Men and Women

Even though symptoms can appear to be similar at times between men and women when they experience depression, treatment approaches should be catered toward them specifically. Research has shown that the way men and women experience depression differently could mean that they respond to different kinds of treatment. These specific kinds of treatments might be more effective with early intervention for young teens who are just starting to show symptoms.

Since women are more likely to ruminate and engage in negative self-talk, focusing more on positive things or distracting themselves can sometimes be more effective for feeling better. Men are more likely to try to mask their sadness or avoid dealing with it so confronting their depressed feelings may be more useful for them in treatment. Men may also have more issues with anger and irritability as part of their depression which need to be addressed as well.

While men are more likely to have a co-occurring issue with substance abuse because they have a tendency to self-medicate their feelings, women are more likely to have a co-occurring mental illness such as an eating disorder or anxiety disorder. Women tend to have more body images issues and react to stressful situations more than men so they might struggle with anorexia, bulimia, anxiety or panic disorder. It is crucial that both genders receive dual diagnosis treatment if they have either a substance abuse problem or another mental illness along with their depression.

Another aspect of treatment that should be considered is the type of medication used to treat depression. Women and men can respond differently to antidepressants so it is important for these issues to be considered when they are given a prescription. Studies have shown that women are often over-treated with antidepressants and men are under-treated with them so a good quality psychiatrist will be able to prescribe the right medication only when necessary.

Regardless of gender, everyone experiences depression in their own unique way and there is no one size fits all treatment. It is important to find therapists and psychiatrists who take your personal needs into account and consider not only your gender but other factors that are specific to you.

Are Men at More Risk for Alcoholism?

Posted on: October 20th, 2017 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Are Men at More Risk for Alcoholism?

For many years, alcoholism has traditionally been considered a man’s disease because rates of alcohol abuse can be up to twice as high among men compared to women. Although the rates of alcoholism among women has been increasing more in recent years, men still tend to struggle with alcohol abuse more often than their counterparts. There are many different factors that can explain why men tend to drink more but overall men have more vulnerability and risk for developing alcoholism.

One reason why men may be more at risk for developing alcoholism has to do with their biological makeup. A recent study revealed that the amount of dopamine that is released with men drink may cause them to be more susceptible to alcohol abuse.

The study focused on both male and female college-age social drinkers and researchers gathered data by asking each participant to undergo a PET scan. The brain scan was used to measure the amount of alcohol-induced dopamine that was released in each person after a drinking session. Dopamine is a chemical that causes pleasurable feelings and can be triggered by rewarding experiences.

Researchers found in this study that in spite of drinking similar amounts, men tended to have a greater amount of dopamine released when they would drink alcohol. The increase of dopamine was found in the ventral striatum which is an area of the brain that is strongly associated with pleasure, reinforcement and addiction formation. Men in the study also tended to have less dopamine release with repeated heavy drinking episodes which means they were more likely to develop a tolerance.

The results of this study point to an innate biological difference between men and women that could be part of the reason that men tend to struggle more often with alcoholism. If men experience a more intense rush of dopamine and pleasurable feelings when they drink then they might be more inclined to abuse alcohol than women.

Social and Biological Factors in Drinking

In addition to differences in brain chemistry, men may also end up drinking more than women because their bodies react to alcohol differently. Men can physically consume more alcohol than women with less negative effects and they also tend to metabolize alcohol faster. Men are simply built with the ability to drink more alcohol which can lead them to excessive drinking more often than women.

There are certain social factors which may also play a role in the risk of alcoholism for men. Drinking alcohol often acts as a type of social bonding activity for men. They can share a special emotional connection with their drinking buddies that is often facilitated by alcohol.

According to some research, women may have less of a need to use alcohol to induce moments of social bonding. Men at times may rely on alcohol to enjoy feel-good moments with their friends and a deeper connection. This may be another reason why men tend to suffer more often from issues of binge drinking and alcoholism.

Consequences of Heavy Drinking for Men

Men have a greater tendency to binge drink than women according to surveys studying gender differences in alcohol consumption. Studies show that the average man has about 12.5 binge drinking episodes a year while the average woman only has about 2.7. Over the course of their lifetime men have a 17 percent chance of becoming alcohol dependent while women’s risk is less than half of that.

Since men binge drink more often they also have higher rates of alcohol-related deaths and hospitalizations than women. Binge drinking can impair a person’s judgment and lead to risky behavior such as drinking and driving or otherwise putting yourself in danger. Men who drink more can also struggle with health problems including heart disease, liver failure and an increased risk for certain cancers in the colon, liver, esophagus and mouth.

Drinking can also have serious consequences on men’s mental health as many develop issues with depression. Studies have revealed that men are more likely to commit suicide and are more likely to have consumed alcohol before the act was committed. Men also tend to become more aggressive when they drink which can lead to physical assaults on other people.

Even though men can physically handle more alcohol than women, they also experience all the negative consequences that are associated with heavy drinking. For men who tend to drink socially as a form of bonding, moderation is key to preventing health problems and risks that are linked to alcohol. Binge drinking is especially risky so it is recommended to reduce or eliminate alcohol if you have issues with drinking excessively.

It is possible to prevent or treat alcoholism if you are aware of the risk factors and symptoms. If you think you might have an issue with alcohol abuse, seek help from a professional treatment center.

What Sets Gooden Center Apart

Posted on: April 13th, 2017 by The Gooden Center No Comments

Men and Women Experience Depression DifferentlyThere are plenty of drug treatment centers in Los Angeles that provide help for addiction and many of them have such similar programs that it can often be hard to tell them apart. Among the many treatment centers available Gooden Center stands out for its quality service because we offer effective addiction recovery programs for our many satisfied clients. In addition to our team of trained and efficient experts there are three things that our clients say attracted them too choosing Gooden as their treatment program.

History

Gooden Center’s history runs all the way back to 1962 when it was founded by Bishop Robert Burton Gooden and several members of Alcoholics Anonymous. The founders of Gooden Center saw the challenges that many men went through in rehabilitation programs. Men dealing with drug addiction wanted to focus on getting better but, at the same time, they needed a safe and compassionate place for their recovery. While Alcoholics Anonymous provided an appropriate venue for support and connection, it was still not ideal for long-term rehabilitation. The Bishop Gooden Home was established as a place for people with addictions to live in a facility while in the process of recovery. It was among the first drug treatment centers in Los Angeles. Gooden Center also has a new mental health treatment program that offers an array of approaches including Dialectal Behavioral Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

Few drug treatment centers in Los Angeles have as rich of a history as the Gooden Center. In fact, you can see glimpses of it in the historic buildings in the Gooden Center compound.

Alcoholism Rehab CenterLocation

The Gooden Center is located in the heart of Pasadena, a former resort town with a history that runs even deeper than the center itself. Not only is it a place for rehabilitation and healing, it is also a starting point to discover a rich culture.

A short distance away from the Gooden Center you can find the Pasadena Museum of California Art and the USC Pacific Asia Museum. The Pasadena Playhouse, a theater with a history the goes back as far as 1917, is also just two blocks away. Also within the vicinity of the treatment center are Old Town Pasadena for restaurants and shopping as well as the Central Park.

The location of our facility provides patients with the opportunity to explore an interesting city and get involved in fun hobbies and activities outside of treatment. Exposure to the arts such as going to a museum or a theatre as well as other activities can be beneficial to therapy and provide an opportunity for patients to connect with each other.

Patient Success

Most importantly, the Gooden Center has an excellent history of patients experiencing recovery and improvement. Since Bishop Gooden and his friends opened up the center in 1962, over 8,000 men have received treatment and made full recoveries.

In fact, many of our alumni still return to the facility because they want to give back and be a part of what we are doing for the community. Many of them serve as mentors for current clients. Others raise funds or awareness towards drug or alcohol addiction in their own communities. Sometimes our alumni just gather to catch up and to share tips and struggles with maintaining a sober lifestyle. Those who have found their lives again through drug treatment centers in Los Angeles want to share it with others and return to the place where their new lives began.